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Author Topic: crossbow use  (Read 12005 times)

Offline GBoyd

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Re: crossbow use
« Reply #15 on: May 21, 2015, 10:09:24 PM »
Oh. Sorry people have given you trouble about in the past, but I don't think there's any problem here. Everybody seems to agree that disable hunters should be allowed to use them.

Offline lokidog

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Re: crossbow use
« Reply #16 on: May 21, 2015, 10:36:41 PM »
Not at all GBoyd.  I hope everyone can understand that I'd prefer to still be toting around my compound.  I just didn't understand the heart burn for allowing disabled persons to hunt with crossbows.  I think I can understand better now.  More or less a general lack of understanding being disabled and how crossbows should be used and how difficult they actually are to drag around.  My hope is that the entire archery community would get that and lay off disabled archery hunters who choose to hunt with a crossbow.

I have seen noone, including myself, that has said that truly disabled hunters should not be able to use a crossbow during archery season.  You are trying to make an argument where none seems to exist.   :dunno:

Offline BoArcher

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Re: crossbow use
« Reply #17 on: May 22, 2015, 09:39:25 AM »
lokidog check out previous crossbow feeds.  Hopefully none exists now. 

Offline lokidog

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Re: crossbow use
« Reply #18 on: May 22, 2015, 09:14:21 PM »
lokidog check out previous crossbow feeds.  Hopefully none exists now.

Please show me examples (I truly am curious, not being snarky), I have read many crossbow threads, and let  my opinion be know, but have not noticed any negativity toward truly disable crossbow users.

Offline STIKNSTRINGBOW

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Re: crossbow use
« Reply #19 on: May 25, 2015, 05:28:40 PM »
I know I have been accused of being an "elitist" because I use a recurve and take a "traditional archery" stance on almost all issues, even though I instruct NASP (Mathews Genesis Compounds)
Crossbows have been around longer than compounds.
I have nothing against handicapped hunters using crossbows during archery seasons, but feel that non-handicapped hunters should only be allowed to use them during modern seasons.
This is because (as previously stated, the act of drawing the bow is inherant to our archery season)
I have met several hunters with crossbows, and had no issue with them.
I do have an issue with the constant complaining by those that want to change the rules on equipment because they are unhappy with what they are using.
If you are handicapped, youth or senior I see nothing wrong with making allowances, even heartily support extra tags, reduces fees, and special seasons.
But if you are not handicapped, then I feel you should quit making excuses about your equipment and use a weapon you are capable with, not change the rules to fit your capabilities.

Do you hear arguments that steroids, underinflated balls, and other forms of "cheating" should be allowed in other sports?
Lets change the rules because it suits a few, and to heck with what has been established as allowable, or restrictive in the past.  :'(
Archery, and Muzzleloaders used to hunt during general seasons.
Due to the restrictive nature of the weapons they were given special seasons and units.
Then "resource allocation" made us choose what weapon we hunted with.
This caused a "grass is greener" mentality and jealousy and controversy drove a wedge between user groups.
I do not judge a person by what he hunts with, but on his/her attitude and behavior.
(NOT SAYING THIS ABOUT THE O/P OR ANYBODY IN PARTICULAR!!!)
You can use lighted nocks, expandable broadheads, and crossbows, or complain about not being able to use closed breach, 209 primers, scopes (on ML) etc.,
but if you cannot harvest an animal without complaining about too restrictive regulations on your equipment, you  should take up golf.
But then probably complain about the weight/design of the balls, clubs, etc..
« Last Edit: May 26, 2015, 07:22:39 PM by STIKNSTRINGBOW »
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Offline BABackcountryBwhntr

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Re: crossbow use
« Reply #20 on: May 26, 2015, 03:23:39 PM »
h20hunter thank you for your reply.  I hate that the crossbow needs to be cocked and ready.  Along with it being cumbersome it is definitely a real hazard for hunting partners.  Weapon safety is paramount!  Problem is I have to use a crank to cock the crossbow.  It takes about 30 seconds or so to load the darn thing.  It wouldn't be feasible to load once you've called in an elk. 

There really is no advantage to using a crossbow.  It's just a tool to keep archery hunters hunting.

I'm sorry, but I disagree completely, there is a massive advantage to using a crossbow, the lack of movement drawing the bow is the main advantage.  Put an animal 10 yards from a crossbow hunter versus a compound or stick hunter and I'll pretty much guarantee the animal will not see the safety come off on the crossbow.

Another advantage is that a bow, whether it be a compound or more "traditional" style, takes much more practice for a person to become proficient.  My crossbow took me about ten shots to be comfortable hitting the bullseye up to 40 yards.  Plus the fact that you can rest a crossbow over a log or on shooting sticks whereas a bow has to be held aloft to fire gives another advantage.

My crossbow is not one of the uber powerful ones so does not have a slighty subsonic speed, but some can certainly outperform a bow that the average person can draw (50-70 pounds).

Now, once again having said that, I have no problems with truly disabled folks from using a crossbow during archery season.  Not that I necessarily agree with this, but WI allows all archers over 65 (or somewhere around there) to use a crossbow during the archery season.  It does make me wonder at the "fairness" though since they don't allow kids or small women to use them.  Presumably they can't draw a bow because of their age or size, so what's the difference?  Of course, they also have a lot more of the resource (deer in this case) to go around.


Exactly this, is is 100% easier to be able to kill with a x bow, and it gives you unfair advantages... one of the hardest parts of bowhunting is knowing when to draw and having to hold at full draw for minutes at times.....

Offline BoArcher

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Re: crossbow use
« Reply #21 on: May 27, 2015, 09:36:27 AM »
Thank you all for your input.  I really appreciate that all of your posts were civil and insightful.  I understand that archery hunters would like to keep the sport as true as possible.  And that that definition is different for each of us individually. 

The main purpose for  my question was my lack of understanding as to why a few archers were saying that they felt once someone was disabled that they should switch to other hunting methods instead of being able to use a crossbow.  I am not advocating that crossbows should be allowed across the board during archery season.  And I'm not sure why anyone would want to.  Believe me when I say I'd much rather be able to use my compound still.  I just can't understand how someone who isn't disabled could say what they would do if faced with having to be excluded from a sport because they couldn't pull a bow back anymore.

Anyway, I appreciate the support from y'all that posted and wish the best to all of you!  And I hope that everyone of you continue to enjoy getting out into the woods with arrows for as lowing as you can.

Offline Jonathan_S

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Re: crossbow use
« Reply #22 on: May 27, 2015, 12:12:01 PM »
The main purpose for  my question was my lack of understanding as to why a few archers were saying that they felt once someone was disabled that they should switch to other hunting methods instead of being able to use a crossbow.

 :hello:
Some people might have a hard time understanding why people want to invent a new hunting method or set of rules when they are capable of hunting with an existing method.

It's a difficult subject.  I tend to side with lokidog.

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Disabilities = a physical or mental condition that limits a person's movements, senses, or activities.

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Online pianoman9701

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Re: crossbow use
« Reply #23 on: May 27, 2015, 12:48:29 PM »
Not at all GBoyd.  I hope everyone can understand that I'd prefer to still be toting around my compound.  I just didn't understand the heart burn for allowing disabled persons to hunt with crossbows.  I think I can understand better now.  More or less a general lack of understanding being disabled and how crossbows should be used and how difficult they actually are to drag around.  My hope is that the entire archery community would get that and lay off disabled archery hunters who choose to hunt with a crossbow.

I have seen noone, including myself, that has said that truly disabled hunters should not be able to use a crossbow during archery season.  You are trying to make an argument where none seems to exist.   :dunno:

 :yeah:
"Restricting the rights of law-abiding citizens based on the actions of criminals and madmen will have no positive effect on the future acts of criminals and madmen. It will only serve to reduce individual rights and the very security of our republic." - Pianoman

Offline STIKNSTRINGBOW

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Re: crossbow use
« Reply #24 on: May 27, 2015, 06:49:00 PM »
Quote
The main purpose for  my question was my lack of understanding as to why a few archers were saying that they felt once someone was disabled that they should switch to other hunting methods instead of being able to use a crossbow
Not my thought, as far as I am concerned, do what you love.. I accept the handicapped, youth, senior, etc..
Just not an able bodied person that finds the challenge too much for their abilities that they need to make it easier or use a more advantageous type of equipment.
They do not call it shopping, they call it hunting, it is not supposed to be easy.
The mountains are calling and I must go."
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"I go to nature to be soothed and healed, and to have my senses put in order."
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Offline Tobinator

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Re: crossbow use
« Reply #25 on: July 29, 2015, 07:56:41 AM »
I'm hunting for the first time in decades.  Also, hunting for the first time in WA and first time using crossbow this Sept 2015.  My co-worker and his buddy are going bow hunting and asked if I wanted to join them.  I have had arthritis for 32 years and have had both elbows and knees replaced.  I can't hike too far and plan to find a spot and sit all morning while my hunting partner hikes around the area.  I agree, the crossbow is heavy and cumbersome, and I haven't even used it in the real world yet.  After reading some of the posts it sounds like it's not going to be easy for me.  I think I'll be staying out of heaving brush and steep terrain.

Online h20hunter

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Re: crossbow use
« Reply #26 on: July 29, 2015, 08:03:20 AM »
Better than sitting at home!

Good luck, welcome to the site, and keep us posted with some pics and stories of the hunt.

Offline STIKNSTRINGBOW

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Re: crossbow use
« Reply #27 on: July 29, 2015, 09:42:09 AM »
I'm hunting for the first time in decades.  Also, hunting for the first time in WA and first time using crossbow this Sept 2015.  My co-worker and his buddy are going bow hunting and asked if I wanted to join them.  I have had arthritis for 32 years and have had both elbows and knees replaced.  I can't hike too far and plan to find a spot and sit all morning while my hunting partner hikes around the area.  I agree, the crossbow is heavy and cumbersome, and I haven't even used it in the real world yet.  After reading some of the posts it sounds like it's not going to be easy for me.  I think I'll be staying out of heaving brush and steep terrain.

Good excuse to get a tree stand.

When I was a new hunter a friend of mines dad was the only way we could get to the woods.
He would drive us to the end of a road, way up on top and tell us he would pick us up on the bottom in a few hours...
Mike and I would get out and walk game trails that left the road, but found most of them crossed the road in different places on the way down, and usually would end up meeting our ride somewhere along the way...
Several times his dad would be waiting for us with a deer/elk.

If you have a comfortable seat in a good spot, having a few guys walking around is a great way to be hunting without having to bust your...
The mountains are calling and I must go."
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Offline fastcrazyhurt

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Re: crossbow use
« Reply #28 on: September 23, 2015, 12:49:48 PM »
I just started the last few years with archery and actually only started hunting with it this year. Many of the hunters in my group are older and can't bear to even pull the bow back anymore so they just stay at camp. a couple others have health issues and were talking about trying to be able to get a disability permit for crossbow.

I like the idea of seniors getting to use crossbows. and if that's to loose of a term then at least the ones with true disability where they can't use a compound or traditional. because most of them used archery from the beginning and love the sport and being in the rut so the other seasons are not what they want to hunt. they are archery hunters and using a crossbow would let them continue to be active in the sport they love using the time they love to hunt.

I'm new and they are teaching me. but i see why you fall in love with archery. the closeness to the game and the times you get to hunt are excellent. it's to me already the ultimate season to hunt. i just wish i could enjoy it more with the old timers that cannot do it anymore.

Offline emac

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Re: crossbow use
« Reply #29 on: September 23, 2015, 01:05:09 PM »
You can if you have a disability. You just need to go to a Dr. Go through a bunch of test have him fill out the paperwork that you get from Wdfw and then return to them and then wait to here back to see if you qualify

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