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Author Topic: New bee hive question  (Read 5228 times)

Offline jackelope

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Re: New bee hive question
« Reply #25 on: June 21, 2016, 09:58:22 PM »






A couple different frames pulled for inspection.
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Offline DaveMonti

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Re: New bee hive question
« Reply #26 on: June 21, 2016, 10:40:11 PM »
I think the larger "growth" looking bit of comb is just where the bees built it out that way.  I used to find these on occasion, and they would break open when I pulled the frame out.  It would expose the larva, just like your pictures.  You can probably just leave it, but I think I used to just shave them off down to the foundation if possible, hope that the bees don't continue to build across frames.  That can make them a bear to pull out! 

The cells at the bottom of the frame look kind of small for queen cells.  Take a look at some pictures on the internet.  Queen cells are usually the size of a peanut, with similar texture. 

Is that a queen in the upper right of the close up shot of the cells at the bottom of the frame?  It's a bigger bee than the others, but it just might be the image.

It's been quite a while since I've been in a hive, so there may be plenty of others that can chime in with better wisdom!

Offline Humptulips

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Re: New bee hive question
« Reply #27 on: June 21, 2016, 10:52:50 PM »
First is queen cells. I don't see any larvae anywhere and looks like the tail end of mature brood hatching. I would say your bees were without a mated queen and are or were raising a queen. Possibly old queen gone with swarm and young queen not laying yet. I would not cut those queen cells unless I saw a queen.
Second is burr comb, drone cells. Bees like a few drone cells especially when they are raising queens and your new comb is all worker cells. They mostly find a place for some drone comb so not unusual.

The queen cells look small alright but the one on the right is for sure a queen cell. Almost look like emergency queen cells but maybe not.
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Offline go4itlab

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Re: New bee hive question
« Reply #28 on: June 22, 2016, 12:07:39 AM »
I agree with Humptulips  :yeah: sound advice.

Offline jackelope

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Re: New bee hive question
« Reply #29 on: June 22, 2016, 06:00:55 AM »
Thanks guys.
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Offline Idabooner

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Re: New bee hive question
« Reply #30 on: June 22, 2016, 09:17:31 AM »
There is very little brood and it appears to be  hatching. It takes 21 days from egg to hatch for worker bees, so it looks like you have not had a good Queen for 18-20 days.  Possibly a bad Queen or she got injured some way.  I don't think that swarm came from your hive, if it had you would have lots of capped brood.   If there is a new un-mated Queen in there it will be about 25-30 days before any new brood hatches.  If you buy a new Queen it will be 3 days to introduce her, and a day or two before she starts laying.   If you wind up with two Queens they will fight to death of one or both.
You could watch that Queen cell for awhile and hope it was started from a good larva and hatched a good Queen and that she come back from her mating flight.  All the indecision's   is what makes raising bees so much fun.  Good luck and keep us up to date.

Offline jackelope

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Re: New bee hive question
« Reply #31 on: June 22, 2016, 10:50:04 AM »
There is very little brood and it appears to be  hatching. It takes 21 days from egg to hatch for worker bees, so it looks like you have not had a good Queen for 18-20 days.  Possibly a bad Queen or she got injured some way.  I don't think that swarm came from your hive, if it had you would have lots of capped brood.   If there is a new un-mated Queen in there it will be about 25-30 days before any new brood hatches.  If you buy a new Queen it will be 3 days to introduce her, and a day or two before she starts laying.   If you wind up with two Queens they will fight to death of one or both.
You could watch that Queen cell for awhile and hope it was started from a good larva and hatched a good Queen and that she come back from her mating flight.  All the indecision's   is what makes raising bees so much fun.  Good luck and keep us up to date.

I think the decision is to leave it alone for a week and then recheck for new eggs and/or a new queen next week.

I've had a couple people think it was our bees that swarmed, and a couple others say it's not our bees. Not sure if we'll be able to tell unless we see our marked queen in the new hive that the beek that caught them has. We're not able to get over to his place till early next week but he said he'd hang on to them for us till then. We are thinking about starting a 2nd hive now after we've had a couple days to think about it.

Fingers crossed. If there was ever anything that reinforced whether or not I have A.D.D., this is it. All the info is mind blowing. The biggest problem I have is how similar everything looks. I need an owner's manual for these creatures!!

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" In today's instant gratification society, more and more pressure revolves around success and the measurement of one's prowess as a hunter by inches on a score chart or field photos produced on social media. Don't fall into the trap. Hunting is-and always will be- about the hunt, the adventure, the views, and time spent with close friends and family. " Ryan Hatfield

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