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Author Topic: Predator pit  (Read 1279 times)

Offline jmscon

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Predator pit
« on: November 21, 2017, 10:58:34 PM »
From reading other posts about reworking wdfw to listen to the views of hunters; mule deer declines; and that this state is turning into a predator pit, I thought I'd start a thread on what areas need the most help with predator control.

I realize everyone will have an opinion on which area needs it more but if we can organize and make more trips to certain areas to make an immediate impact for the survival of next years fawns and calves. And at the same time, work on making more voices heard in Olympia, we might be able to help our herds.

It's an uphill battle, untouchables like wolves, cougar quotas and hibernating bears can slow things down but if we can get together and make sure the quotas are filled every year and go bear hunting in units that have struggling ungulate numbers we might be able to start to make a difference.

I'm not the most educated on predator hunting and which areas need the most help but from what I've been reading lately:
Okanogan
Klickitat
???
Post the area you think needs the most help

Mods Please move if in the wrong location
My interpretation of the rules are open to interpretation.
Once I thought I was wrong but I was mistaken.

Offline KFhunter

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Re: Predator pit
« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2017, 11:47:03 PM »
whack em and stack em  :tup:

Offline eastsidemallard74

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Re: Predator pit
« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2017, 05:54:39 AM »
We went deer hunting this year in tonasket/okanagon, holy cow, dog heaven  there. Heading out to our spot, we pushed up 8 the first morning, than the 2nd morning saw another 15 total through the day. Alot of bones all over ther place. A little disappointed because we had heard how good it was there. Another spot thday declined was the recent creek area. But I heard thday wad from wolf and cougar populations sky rocketing

Offline Calvin Rayborn

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Re: Predator pit
« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2017, 11:52:30 PM »
SSS

Offline Calvin Rayborn

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Re: Predator pit
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2017, 11:52:59 PM »
whack em and stack em  :tup:

Go Uncle TED!  :yeah:

Offline rsrubalcaba

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Re: Predator pit
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2018, 06:54:32 PM »
Get idea. The more yotes and bears that take a dirt nap the better.

Hunting in the 'Nooch Valley this year, so much cat sign. It was kind of ridiculous

Offline KFhunter

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Re: Predator pit
« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2018, 07:10:21 PM »
From reading other posts about reworking wdfw to listen to the views of hunters; mule deer declines; and that this state is turning into a predator pit, I thought I'd start a thread on what areas need the most help with predator control.

I realize everyone will have an opinion on which area needs it more but if we can organize and make more trips to certain areas to make an immediate impact for the survival of next years fawns and calves. And at the same time, work on making more voices heard in Olympia, we might be able to help our herds.

It's an uphill battle, untouchables like wolves, cougar quotas and hibernating bears can slow things down but if we can get together and make sure the quotas are filled every year and go bear hunting in units that have struggling ungulate numbers we might be able to start to make a difference.

I'm not the most educated on predator hunting and which areas need the most help but from what I've been reading lately:
Okanogan
Klickitat
???
Post the area you think needs the most help

Mods Please move if in the wrong location

check out this thread

http://hunting-washington.com/smf/index.php/topic,134715.0.html


Offline buglebrush

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Re: Predator pit
« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2018, 07:23:46 PM »
NE Corner.  Wolves, Grizz & Black bears, Cats, Yotes, Bobcats, and no spring bear hunting at all in some GMU's.  WDFW is worse than inept, they're obviously intentionally sabotaging our future.   :bash:

Offline Baranouskas

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Re: Predator pit
« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2018, 05:56:53 AM »
I hunt for coyots more and more every and have plans to spend a lot more time in Okanogan county next year.  In the last 2 years Iíve seen wolf tracks in Douglas and Chelan counties, not to mention all the different cougar sign Iíve seen.  Heck I had about 20 Trail Cam pics of 3 different cougars this last year in my back yard!! Iím September thru December. All at night though, damn it!
 With fires decimating food sources for deer and other animals it is really taking a toll on deer numbers returning to past numbers and quality deer donít have time to age.
Anyways, I have a personal quota this next year for over 50 coyotes.

Offline Gringo31

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Re: Predator pit
« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2018, 09:19:10 AM »
Just want to point out that location is one part of the equation, but season and timing is the other.  For coyotes, there is a reason the USDA aerial guns them late February. 

It WOULD be a good thing however if folks put time into removing predators vs. only focused on shooting prey.    :tup:
We must reject the idea that every time a law's broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions.
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Offline Skyvalhunter

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Re: Predator pit
« Reply #10 on: February 05, 2018, 09:30:04 AM »
It would be a good thing if the season for that predator be opened.

Offline Baranouskas

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Re: Predator pit
« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2018, 10:20:16 AM »
Does the USDA have quotas?  How long do they aerial gun them, week, 2 weeks?  Do they post where they do this?

Offline Gringo31

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Re: Predator pit
« Reply #12 on: February 05, 2018, 02:51:57 PM »
I believe they are private contract thru USDA?  Owner pays to have it flown.
We must reject the idea that every time a law's broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions.
-Ronald Reagan