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Author Topic: Sous Vide cooking  (Read 4747 times)

Offline quadrafire

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Sous Vide cooking
« on: April 26, 2017, 02:24:50 PM »
For those of you that cook with this method. I thought this would be a good place to put recipes you want to share. I am thinking about immersing myself (haha/play on words) in this activity in the near future.
So post em up.
Piano's last post got me thinking pretty seriously about it.
Tips and techniques, hints, equipment etc.

Offline Shaqdiesel

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Re: Sous Vide cooking
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2017, 02:32:46 PM »
I have the anova precision and so far I have just been googling recipes, I really like it for taking stuff straight from the freezer and cooking it and you just have to add some time to the cook but so far it has served me well and I actually use it, unlike most other dumb kitchen gadgets.
60% of the time, it works every time.

Offline Angry Perch

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Re: Sous Vide cooking
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2017, 02:43:43 PM »
Soft boiled eggs. 40 minutes at 145 degrees. Crack them open on a piece of buttered toast. Yum!
I put them in small Pyrex bowls to keep them from rolling around in the pot and possibly cracking.
Also, it's amazing how much difference 1 or 2 degrees makes. You can dial it in for the perfect consistency.

I was also inspired by the Starbucks sous vide egg bites. Whisk eggs and some cream, add salt & pepper, and your choice of cheese, bacon, spinach, or??? I put them in greased 4oz canning jars, and they worked great.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2017, 02:49:34 PM by Angry Perch »

Offline merkaba93

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Re: Sous Vide cooking
« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2017, 10:30:52 PM »
Here are a few examples of what I've done in the last few months. Holding temp while making cheese is a pain so using the sous vide to hold the temp makes life a lot easier. So I made some cheddar cheese curds and then poutine. The other is a pork tenderloin over some butternut squash and ricotta chive gnocchi and sage brown butter.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2017, 10:39:24 PM by merkaba93 »
Be Better than Cream of Mushroom Soup

Offline pianoman9701

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Re: Sous Vide cooking
« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2017, 12:41:53 PM »
Here are a few examples of what I've done in the last few months. Holding temp while making cheese is a pain so using the sous vide to hold the temp makes life a lot easier. So I made some cheddar cheese curds and then poutine. The other is a pork tenderloin over some butternut squash and ricotta chive gnocchi and sage brown butter.

How long did you cook the pork and at what temp?
"Restricting the rights of law-abiding citizens based on the actions of criminals and madmen will have no positive effect on the future acts of criminals and madmen. It will only serve to reduce individual rights and the very security of our republic." - Pianoman

Offline NRA4LIFE

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Re: Sous Vide cooking
« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2017, 12:54:45 PM »
Moose sirloin with a bit of olive oil, Johnny's and pepper.  4 hours at 131 degrees and into a very hot cast iron pan for a quick sear on each side.  Absolutely outstanding.
Look man, some times you just gotta roll the dice

So many free days, so few fish....

Offline quadrafire

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Re: Sous Vide cooking
« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2017, 07:38:21 AM »
How do you know how long to cook different foods?
example 40 min for an egg, 4 hrs for a sirloin
Is it trial and error?

Offline pianoman9701

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Re: Sous Vide cooking
« Reply #7 on: May 01, 2017, 08:04:36 AM »
There are sous vide instructions not only at the website for the product you buy, but all over the web. Cooking time has a minimum and a maximum (ex. 1.5 to 4 hours). The lower end of the scale is the minimum to achieve the desired doneness. The upper end of the scale is to ensure that you don't create a bacteria problem with extended time below 135 degrees. Anything over that mark can cook for a very long time, up to 24 hours or more. Longer cooking times mean more of an opportunity for meat broths, seasonings, herbs, oil and butter (always use some extra, flavorful oil or butter), to infuse flavors into the meat. It also changes the texture of meats like pork.

One of the other benefits of the flexible time thing is that you can plan your plating perfectly - everything done at the same time. It also gives you time to relax before dinner with a cigar and copious quantities of your favorite beverage.
"Restricting the rights of law-abiding citizens based on the actions of criminals and madmen will have no positive effect on the future acts of criminals and madmen. It will only serve to reduce individual rights and the very security of our republic." - Pianoman

Offline Angry Perch

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Re: Sous Vide cooking
« Reply #8 on: May 01, 2017, 08:30:24 AM »
There are sous vide instructions not only at the website for the product you buy, but all over the web. Cooking time has a minimum and a maximum (ex. 1.5 to 4 hours). The lower end of the scale is the minimum to achieve the desired doneness. The upper end of the scale is to ensure that you don't create a bacteria problem with extended time below 135 degrees. Anything over that mark can cook for a very long time, up to 24 hours or more. Longer cooking times mean more of an opportunity for meat broths, seasonings, herbs, oil and butter (always use some extra, flavorful oil or butter), to infuse flavors into the meat. It also changes the texture of meats like pork.

One of the other benefits of the flexible time thing is that you can plan your plating perfectly - everything done at the same time. It also gives you time to relax before dinner with a cigar and copious quantities of your favorite beverage.

And if you pass out on the couch, you won't burn the house down!

Offline NRA4LIFE

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Re: Sous Vide cooking
« Reply #9 on: May 07, 2017, 12:00:32 PM »
It's been trial and error for us.  Depends on the cut of meat largely.  We did some elk loin from a small cow for 4 hours and it just about melted. It was so good. 
Look man, some times you just gotta roll the dice

So many free days, so few fish....

Offline Caseknife

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Re: Sous Vide cooking
« Reply #10 on: July 11, 2017, 08:19:25 PM »
So I just dove into sous vide and my first try was elk round.  I cooked at 140 for 4 hours, should have stayed at 135 or below, it was a bit too done, but good flavor.

Offline quadrafire

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Re: Sous Vide cooking
« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2017, 09:13:05 PM »
ThAnks all for the tips. Keep em
Coming. I think I'll do this at some
Point

Offline Miss Muzzleloader

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Re: Sous Vide cooking
« Reply #12 on: July 12, 2017, 03:55:46 PM »
I prepared thick sliced bacon for ten hours at 147*, followed by a very quick fry at high heat.  I set it up Friday night for a great Saturday morning breakfast.  Who would have thought you can improve upon bacon??!!
« Last Edit: July 13, 2017, 07:36:06 AM by Miss Muzzleloader »

Offline pianoman9701

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Re: Sous Vide cooking
« Reply #13 on: July 12, 2017, 04:33:28 PM »
Chicken's a tough one. Most of the instructions I read have you cook chicken at 145 or 146 degrees. The breasts come out nice and juicy; no problem. Legs are another story. The meat is unattractive and it feels like you're eating raw chicken. It's tender and everything, but the appearance and texture say raw. I cooked some Buffalo wings two nights ago - same result. So next time I cook legs or thighs, I think I'm going hotter, like at least 155-160. Anyone else have feedback on this?
"Restricting the rights of law-abiding citizens based on the actions of criminals and madmen will have no positive effect on the future acts of criminals and madmen. It will only serve to reduce individual rights and the very security of our republic." - Pianoman

Offline Angry Perch

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Re: Sous Vide cooking
« Reply #14 on: July 13, 2017, 10:19:13 AM »
Chicken's a tough one. Most of the instructions I read have you cook chicken at 145 or 146 degrees. The breasts come out nice and juicy; no problem. Legs are another story. The meat is unattractive and it feels like you're eating raw chicken. It's tender and everything, but the appearance and texture say raw. I cooked some Buffalo wings two nights ago - same result. So next time I cook legs or thighs, I think I'm going hotter, like at least 155-160. Anyone else have feedback on this?

I haven't done chicken, but that's the age old problem with them damn birds. Cook white meat correctly, and dark meat is rare, and vice versa. Someone needs to engineer an all dark meat chicken (and turkey) and put a stop to this nonsense!

 

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