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Author Topic: Pond Aeration  (Read 590 times)

Offline Shannon

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Pond Aeration
« on: September 05, 2017, 09:46:10 PM »
I have a pond that is 20' deep and an acre in size. It is spring fed. It doesn't get a lot of fresh water this time of year. I want to aerate it so I can raise rainbows in it. There isn't any power near it so I was thinking of using solar or wind to aerate it. Anyone have any experience with something similar? Let me know. I'm doing my research now but I'd like to have something set up for next year. Thanks

Offline Da stump

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Re: Pond Aeration
« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2017, 10:32:16 PM »
ebay has 12v pond aerator pumps, just need to hook up your battery bank, a timer and either wind or solar with a regulator :hello:
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Offline PolarBear

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Re: Pond Aeration
« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2017, 10:47:35 PM »
My Uncle had 2 windmills hooked up to pumps that recirculated and sprayed water back into the pond. His pond was about 3 acres.
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Offline Happy Gilmore

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Re: Pond Aeration
« Reply #3 on: September 05, 2017, 11:07:16 PM »
without power its a chore. Its not something which you can do intermittently and expect results. For something low cost with good results an electric pump is the best choice. drag lining the bottom in the winter months when all the crap has settled is a good start. I've been plotting some ideas and working with a couple people on a few projects to make a prototype for this purpose. I won't likely get around to it until spring because of some personal obligations on projects in the coming weeks which will last through the winter months.

I've been in waste water and pond building for every application under the sun for some time and worked with some of the best engineers on the exact issues we experience on our small ponds locally. Circulation is foremost. Unnatural circulation is attainable. Its difficult. I've seen a golf course in North Idaho do wonders with some good old fashioned handy work. I've also seen municipalities spend millions on small settling ponds have the poorest results due to over thinking a simple problem.

Ive seen windmill turbines/pumps work surprisingly well on small ponds. I've also seen them used on duck hunting estates to keep water clear of ice which is the same concept of gaining water flow to keep them clear of ice. There are some floating windmill pumps outside of Spokane I've seen work really well for getting O2 into the water and getting the good bugs working in a stagnant pond. Folks think all effluent ponds are just poo but, far from the case. Most ponds which smell really bad and simply in need of oxygen. (from a waste water management standpoint)

I've worked on a few projects which experimented with Bio-floats. Basically, they built "islands" which were living organisms designed to absorb and use the over abundance of nitrogen concentrated in the water from an unnatural abundance of nutrients. Usually, these are associated with fertilizers, manure waste and run off. Making floating islands of cattails (and other plant sources) can be used fairly effectively. There are numerous treatment plants now using similar technology for water "scrubbing". Cle Elum plant along I-90 uses a cat tail farm to scrub water. This was an early example which paid out the engineering firm involved a pile of cash. I got to get a part of that of course:).


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Offline farmin4u_98948

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Re: Pond Aeration
« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2017, 05:39:25 AM »
Great topic. I have one also on chinook pass Gold Creek area.  It gets really choked this time of year
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Offline Shannon

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Re: Pond Aeration
« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2017, 07:01:35 AM »
Thanks for the replies guys.
DaStump-It's not as easy as you make it sound. Most of the DC compressors aren't rated to work in 20' of water and they will burn up quickly.
I'm leaning towards a windmill. The initial cost is less than batteries and charge controllers. I have solar panels already but I just think the windmill will be less maintenance. I was curious if anyone had experience with the two. I have a ridge above the pond by about 150' that catches a fair amount of wind. Just thermals alone should turn the windmill enough to do a decent job. Its in the Okanogan so it will freeze over in the winter. I think I will have to disconnect it when it gets really cold. I've read that pumping really cold air into the bottom of the pond is bad for fish also.
Lots to figure out. Keep any words of wisdom coming. I appreciate it.

Offline runamuk

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Re: Pond Aeration
« Reply #6 on: September 06, 2017, 07:30:19 AM »
I dunno the trout do fine in the "lake" at work and it's maybe 4 feet deep and an acre with some very minimal seep feed this time of year. It's more like a big swamp full of trout. It needs dredging.  I don't think any if the trout lakes in the area have much water flow this time of year and they freeze over in winter. I did have trout prior to stocking so I know they survive in my work pond, lake whatever you wanna call it.
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Offline Alchase

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Re: Pond Aeration
« Reply #7 on: September 06, 2017, 09:54:50 AM »
Here in Oklahoma, a lot of farmers and ranchers use Tilapia in their seep ponds to control the vegetation. They are everywhere here.
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Offline runamuk

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Re: Pond Aeration
« Reply #8 on: September 06, 2017, 03:45:47 PM »
Here in Oklahoma, a lot of farmers and ranchers use Tilapia in their seep ponds to control the vegetation. They are everywhere here.
Pretty sure wdfw does not have tilapia in their accepted methods of weed control.  Pretty sure the tribes and the fly fishermen would have my head on stake if I added another outsider fish to the problems plaguing native waterways. 

Heck I think they frown on bass bluegill etc in my area, strictly trout in ponds and steelhead in river.

Small pumps can be had on the reasonable and wired up to a solar/battery set up. It doesn't take much aeration for most pond fish.
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