collapse
Quality Hunts for over 30 Years

Author Topic: It's called respect  (Read 8362 times)

Offline Special T

  • Truth the new Hate Speech.
  • Washington For Wildlife
  • Trade Count: (+13)
  • Explorer
  • ******
  • Join Date: Aug 2009
  • Posts: 19070
  • Location: Skagit Valley
  • Make it Rain!
    • Silver Arrow Bowmen
    • Silver Arrow Bowmen
Re: It's called respect
« Reply #45 on: October 30, 2017, 11:08:53 AM »
It seems this occurs more during rifle season. Claiming dominion where ever one can see... One of several reasons why i switched to archery.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

In archery we have something like the way of the superior man. When the archer misses the center of the target, he turns round and seeks for the cause of his failure in himself. 

Confucius

Offline ghosthunter

  • Political Topics
  • Trade Count: (+6)
  • Old Salt
  • ******
  • Join Date: Apr 2011
  • Posts: 5022
  • Location: Mount Vernon WA
Re: It's called respect
« Reply #46 on: October 30, 2017, 11:19:45 AM »
I understand these points to a certain point ,I try to do my homework too the best of my ability and time availible to avoid other hunters on public land but if a plan doesn't Pan out accordingly  then sometimes I gotta park at a spur rd and do a spur  of the moment hunt and hope other hunters won't drive behind me even though they have a RIGHT  to do what they want, I'd hope they'd use there brain and give a hunter some space, but I guess I live under a rock and its irrelevant anymore these days.  :dunno:

I think you are correct to an extent but for me, if i were in your situation, would be that if a hunter decided to drive by me that he would take it upon himself to be courteous towards you. Just because someone drives by doesn't mean they will immediately screw up your hunt. Now when people drive by me on closed roads, that is where I lose my mind.  :bash:

I give people benefit of a doubt when its an honest mistake, I've had it happen before an s it was  cool ... they guy apologized  not realizing that I was in there and backed out, happens all the time no big deal but when a guy deliberately drives behind me while I'm walking down a road that's straight as an arrow and he can see the end of the road and he's  just trying to be an ass I lose my mind.

Sadly I don't think some folks have a clue. They are so intent on their plan that they do not even consider anyone else. I have more hope for the fellow who thinks it might be wrong and does it anyway, then the guy who it never even cross their mind that they shouldn't do something like that.

There is a lot different hunter out their than 30 years ago. Sad :twocents:
GHOST CAMP "We Came To Hunt"
Proud Parent of A United States Marine

We are all traveling from Birth to the Packing House. ( Broken Trail)

Offline Special T

  • Truth the new Hate Speech.
  • Washington For Wildlife
  • Trade Count: (+13)
  • Explorer
  • ******
  • Join Date: Aug 2009
  • Posts: 19070
  • Location: Skagit Valley
  • Make it Rain!
    • Silver Arrow Bowmen
    • Silver Arrow Bowmen
Re: It's called respect
« Reply #47 on: October 30, 2017, 11:21:31 AM »
Do you guys see this as prevalent during muzzy hunting?  Or am I right that this seems more of a rifle issue?

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

In archery we have something like the way of the superior man. When the archer misses the center of the target, he turns round and seeks for the cause of his failure in himself. 

Confucius

Offline JimmyHoffa

  • Non-Hunting Topics
  • Trade Count: (+2)
  • Explorer
  • ******
  • Join Date: Sep 2010
  • Posts: 10436
  • Location: 150 Years Too Late
Re: It's called respect
« Reply #48 on: October 30, 2017, 11:23:33 AM »
It seems this occurs more during rifle season. Claiming dominion where ever one can see... One of several reasons why i switched to archery.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk
Probably because deer hunters in this state are primarily rifle hunters.  Go to some of the elk units during early archery and you'll see some really territorial guys.

Offline ghosthunter

  • Political Topics
  • Trade Count: (+6)
  • Old Salt
  • ******
  • Join Date: Apr 2011
  • Posts: 5022
  • Location: Mount Vernon WA
Re: It's called respect
« Reply #49 on: October 30, 2017, 11:36:56 AM »
Do you guys see this as prevalent during muzzy hunting?  Or am I right that this seems more of a rifle issue?

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

I have been muzzy hunting for 6-7 years now and never ran into it except for campsites.
A friend who has always Bow hunted elk came muzzy this year with me, and tells the story of a group of guys who hunted the area we were in out of tree stands. If you came close to their stands on NF lands they would ask you not to come around there.

I would not be receptive to that conversation. I might avoid those areas on my own ,but if someone told to stay out, that would be a problem.
GHOST CAMP "We Came To Hunt"
Proud Parent of A United States Marine

We are all traveling from Birth to the Packing House. ( Broken Trail)

Offline full choke

  • Non-Hunting Topics
  • Trade Count: (+4)
  • Longhunter
  • *****
  • Join Date: Jan 2009
  • Posts: 721
  • Location: Maple Valley
Re: It's called respect
« Reply #50 on: October 30, 2017, 11:58:36 AM »
Do you guys see this as prevalent during muzzy hunting?  Or am I right that this seems more of a rifle issue?

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

I have had it happen during muzzy elk season. I think you may be correct that it is more prevalent during modern, but only because there are more people in the woods at that time.

I actually think you see more of this behavior in the marshes during duck season than you ever do in the mountains...
Winter is coming.

Offline NumaJohn

  • Political Topics
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Hunter
  • ***
  • Join Date: Sep 2010
  • Posts: 175
  • Location: Spokane, WA
Re: It's called respect
« Reply #51 on: October 30, 2017, 01:40:38 PM »
Hello, all.

I think that if a vehicle is parked in front of a locked gate to a single clearcut or something along those lines, it's the right thing (for me) to do to go somewhere else. But what if there's a vehicle parked in front of a locked gate on a road that leads into a vast range of available hunting land? Just because someone is there ahead of me, do I have to feel guilty about parking and hunting that country, too? I don't think so.

One place I like to deer hunt, there are often guys sitting before first light in trucks, idling their vehicles at the beginning of a road that you can drive for several miles. I have always slowed down, but I have also always driven right past them and into the area to then park and walk and hunt. Again, I know their hope was to wait until legal shooting hours and then slowly drive and road hunt the area undisturbed, but I hope no one on here would expect me or any other hunter to actually honor the idea that because the road hunters were there at the bottom of the road first, anyone arriving afterward should just sit and wait for the roadhunters to go first or, alternatively, leave them be and find another area to drive into and hunt.

I also have to add that while I do not like to road hunt, because of the age and physical condition of family members, I have done it. I cannot stand it when public land users lay sole claim to public land. Yesterday, coming back from elk hunting, guys near a camp had parked their vehicle right in the middle of a public road that lead into (but also past) their camp. I assume they did this to protect their camp from someone driving in and loading up their generator and such. But come on, it's not debatable: that truck parked there is a sign of disrespect for others--other hunters but also anyone else wanting to recreate or work on that piece of public land. That kind of selfishness/protective behavior gives all hunters a bad name.

John

Offline WSU

  • Political Topics
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Frontiersman
  • *****
  • Join Date: Mar 2009
  • Posts: 3908
Re: It's called respect
« Reply #52 on: October 30, 2017, 01:49:47 PM »
It was a bit of a struggle for us this year during muzzy elk.  We hunt timber co property and there are nearly no spots that don't have a road.  We had a guy drive into the ditch to drive around my truck at the edge of a clearcut at the end of the road.  Literally no where else he could be going.  He ended up blowing out a herd of elk we were stalking while he drove through the middle of the cut.  Some people just can't help it.

The next morning we had a guy pull in behind us in the dark.  He turned around and hunted another road.  We killed a bull.  He heard us shoot and came to help get the elk out nice.  Turns out he was there first the day before and I had turned around to leave the spot to him.  Not everyone is a pain in the rear and some definitely get it. 

Offline CAMPMEAT

  • CAMPMEAT
  • Washington For Wildlife
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Explorer
  • ******
  • Join Date: Sep 2010
  • Posts: 12995
  • Location: ARIZONA, A PLACE WHERE I DON'T WANT YOU LIVING !!
  • I love my gun rights in Arizona..
Re: It's called respect
« Reply #53 on: October 30, 2017, 01:54:31 PM »
I'm glad this hasn't turned into an anti-ORV issue like it normally does... :chuckle:
I couldn't care less about what anybody says..............

Online quadrafire

  • Site Sponsor
  • Trade Count: (+5)
  • Old Salt
  • *****
  • Join Date: Sep 2009
  • Posts: 7069
  • Location: Spokane
Re: It's called respect
« Reply #54 on: October 30, 2017, 01:55:30 PM »
I'm glad this hasn't turned into an anti-ORV issue like it normally does... :chuckle:
just wait

Offline vandeman17

  • Non-Hunting Topics
  • Trade Count: (+6)
  • Old Salt
  • ******
  • Join Date: Jul 2007
  • Posts: 8688
  • Location: Wenatchee
Re: It's called respect
« Reply #55 on: October 30, 2017, 01:57:47 PM »
I'm glad this hasn't turned into an anti-ORV issue like it normally does... :chuckle:

Don't even get me started on those lazy SOBs!  :chuckle: Jk I have no issue with orv and atv guys that follow the rules and stay on designated legal roads. They push animals to me.  :tup:
" I have hunted almost every day of my life, the rest have been wasted"

Offline CAMPMEAT

  • CAMPMEAT
  • Washington For Wildlife
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Explorer
  • ******
  • Join Date: Sep 2010
  • Posts: 12995
  • Location: ARIZONA, A PLACE WHERE I DON'T WANT YOU LIVING !!
  • I love my gun rights in Arizona..
Re: It's called respect
« Reply #56 on: October 30, 2017, 02:00:41 PM »
I knew I'd get some attention on that one.. Sure happy I live in the land of the free now... Arizona :tup:
I couldn't care less about what anybody says..............

Online ruttnbuck

  • blacktail finatic
  • Non-Hunting Topics
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Hunter
  • ***
  • Join Date: Oct 2008
  • Posts: 199
  • Location: In the woods
Re: It's called respect
« Reply #57 on: October 30, 2017, 02:14:22 PM »
 With deer, really??? Its a animal  that your probably only getting 50#s of meat from  +or- 10# (I'm talking blacktail in western wa.) so in my head its not worth being a bone head. Use your head the way it was intended.

Offline runamuk

  • Trade Count: (+1)
  • Explorer
  • ******
  • Join Date: Jan 2008
  • Posts: 17763
  • Location: Somewhere in the Blues.
  • "I'm bored play with me"
Re: It's called respect
« Reply #58 on: October 31, 2017, 03:17:58 PM »
With deer, really??? Its a animal  that your probably only getting 50#s of meat from  +or- 10# (I'm talking blacktail in western wa.) so in my head its not worth being a bone head. Use your head the way it was intended.
So I started hunting in 2009 and my first season was western WA blacktail and it was really hard, because every single place I scouted I found a truck or 3 so I moved along. Basically I ended up not hunting because my ethics said don't walk in on someone etc.

I now hunt eastern WA we get 11 days. That's it. I get maybe 4 between work and health. I can't hike like I could, I can't drive places the way I could.  I have no partner.  I just do the best I can but the woods are public I will go where it works best for me.  Because if I do not care about ME it's proven no one else will.

What I hate are guys who block dead end roads as if they own that road or the guys who hang no trespassing signs on public land, or the dozen guys who will walk in right on top of me and then scope me.

I may kill something some day but it's insanely hard to just go hunt out there and in my case it's not getting easier and may actually end.

So maybe consider that what you think is just inconsiderate is people trying to enjoy the outdoors not ruin your hunt.

Sent from a fairy ring

benchleg

Offline Stumps

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Pilgrim
  • *
  • Join Date: Oct 2013
  • Posts: 24
  • Location: Eatonville
  • Groups: NRA
Re: It's called respect
« Reply #59 on: October 31, 2017, 09:09:11 PM »
I took a buddy out that has never gotten a deer, this is his second year hunting. I had him a good spot under a tree, with low hanging branches overlooking a well used game trail. We were about a half mile in from the trailhead and no one else was there when we arrived. I told him that I was going to head down the trail a bit further and hook around to see if I could push anything his way.

So there he sits all quiet when 3 guys come walking down, all camo, no guns whispering back and forth. I assume they were scouting for either muzzleloader or archery given the clothing. They stop and glass the clearing that my buddy is set up on. My buddy lets out a little cough to let them know he is there and they immediately turns to see him sitting there, then move into his sight line on the clearing. Then the start loudly talking and fidgeting with a radio.

I am a quarter mile up the trail by this point and my radio starts vibrating, but there is no voice coming across. I hit the call button and then hear a voice not my buddy's coming over the radio. The other "hunters" were switching channels broadcasting to try to make other people's radios make noise. They eventually move on from my buddy's location and move down my way.

I had thought I saw a ear flick and was glassing an area pretty hard while hiding behind a tree. The three guys see me and instead of moving away or going around they headed straight for me and start talking loudly again. I decide at this point that the area is likely blown and head back to the tree where I left my buddy. He then explains what they did in front of his spot once they saw him. On the way out it took every ounce of self control I had not to do something to their truck.

They were purposely going out spoiling other people's season in hopes those deer would be around when it was their turn again.


 

* Recent Topics