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Author Topic: Salmon fishing/Not likley  (Read 4781 times)

Offline JimmyHoffa

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Re: Salmon fishing/Not likley
« Reply #45 on: December 17, 2017, 09:48:33 AM »
I think most of the AK fish stay near AK, some head over toward Russia and northern Japan.  The maps I remember seeing had the WA fish that were closest to the coast going to the Western Gulf of Alaska.  The Puget Sound fish going more toward the central part.  Lower Columbia river fish going more to the SE Gulf and around Northern British Columbia.  The fish that would hang around off the WA and OR coasts had a lot from Idaho and way up the Columbia, and lots from California/S Oregon.

Offline W_Ellison2011

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Re: Salmon fishing/Not likley
« Reply #46 on: December 17, 2017, 05:29:12 PM »
I also have a question about this subject. How is it that the Average salmon caught in Alaska is much bigger than in Washington state if all of the salmon we get back are coming from all the way up there? I'm speaking from experience btw. I lived in Alaska for a short time and fished there as much as I could. The average Coho up there is 10+ lbs and the average king is 20+ lbs.. here in Washington that's a much smaller number. Another thing I have to ask about is that Pink salmon run every year in Alaska whereas here in Washington we get a run every other year. how does that make sense? I get that some of our fish go that far north but I feel like most of our salmon go mainly up into Canadian waters or just further out into the ocean. I could be completely wrong... but then again in all the years I have fished Washington state I have only pulled up a hand full of kings that were 20 lbs or more and silvers are 6-8 lbs if you are lucky. The pinks we caught up there were also bigger. 8-10 lbs average! The pinks we get down here are like 3-5 lbs. Just my  :twocents: but feel free to fill me in if you have any info. I love salmon fishing and will continue to do so in the future.. just not in Washington state, unless its the hump or if I go with a charter on the Columbia lol. Btw, I'm talking sport fishing more than netting and yes I know there is a big difference in catch. My biggest king is a hair under 40 lbs and that was in Canada up on Queen Charlotte island and my biggest silver was while I was living in Ketchikan, Alaska and it was 16 lbs. I WANT TO GO BACK!  :chuckle:

Offline deerlick

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Re: Salmon fishing/Not likley
« Reply #47 on: December 17, 2017, 07:51:57 PM »
It's tough when they are sorted through before we see em down here

Offline Duckslayer89

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Re: Salmon fishing/Not likley
« Reply #48 on: December 17, 2017, 08:08:50 PM »
I also have a question about this subject. How is it that the Average salmon caught in Alaska is much bigger than in Washington state if all of the salmon we get back are coming from all the way up there? I'm speaking from experience btw. I lived in Alaska for a short time and fished there as much as I could. The average Coho up there is 10+ lbs and the average king is 20+ lbs.. here in Washington that's a much smaller number. Another thing I have to ask about is that Pink salmon run every year in Alaska whereas here in Washington we get a run every other year. how does that make sense? I get that some of our fish go that far north but I feel like most of our salmon go mainly up into Canadian waters or just further out into the ocean. I could be completely wrong... but then again in all the years I have fished Washington state I have only pulled up a hand full of kings that were 20 lbs or more and silvers are 6-8 lbs if you are lucky. The pinks we caught up there were also bigger. 8-10 lbs average! The pinks we get down here are like 3-5 lbs. Just my  :twocents: but feel free to fill me in if you have any info. I love salmon fishing and will continue to do so in the future.. just not in Washington state, unless its the hump or if I go with a charter on the Columbia lol. Btw, I'm talking sport fishing more than netting and yes I know there is a big difference in catch. My biggest king is a hair under 40 lbs and that was in Canada up on Queen Charlotte island and my biggest silver was while I was living in Ketchikan, Alaska and it was 16 lbs. I WANT TO GO BACK!  :chuckle:

10+ pound average is far fetched. I worked on a salmon tender throughout the whole troll season in SE Alaska and saw 10s of thousands of coho I think the average was 5-7 pounds as the season got later.
@skillet

Offline W_Ellison2011

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Re: Salmon fishing/Not likley
« Reply #49 on: December 18, 2017, 03:42:32 PM »
I also have a question about this subject. How is it that the Average salmon caught in Alaska is much bigger than in Washington state if all of the salmon we get back are coming from all the way up there? I'm speaking from experience btw. I lived in Alaska for a short time and fished there as much as I could. The average Coho up there is 10+ lbs and the average king is 20+ lbs.. here in Washington that's a much smaller number. Another thing I have to ask about is that Pink salmon run every year in Alaska whereas here in Washington we get a run every other year. how does that make sense? I get that some of our fish go that far north but I feel like most of our salmon go mainly up into Canadian waters or just further out into the ocean. I could be completely wrong... but then again in all the years I have fished Washington state I have only pulled up a hand full of kings that were 20 lbs or more and silvers are 6-8 lbs if you are lucky. The pinks we caught up there were also bigger. 8-10 lbs average! The pinks we get down here are like 3-5 lbs. Just my  :twocents: but feel free to fill me in if you have any info. I love salmon fishing and will continue to do so in the future.. just not in Washington state, unless its the hump or if I go with a charter on the Columbia lol. Btw, I'm talking sport fishing more than netting and yes I know there is a big difference in catch. My biggest king is a hair under 40 lbs and that was in Canada up on Queen Charlotte island and my biggest silver was while I was living in Ketchikan, Alaska and it was 16 lbs. I WANT TO GO BACK!  :chuckle:

10+ pound average is far fetched. I worked on a salmon tender throughout the whole troll season in SE Alaska and saw 10s of thousands of coho I think the average was 5-7 pounds as the season got later.
@skillet
We had 4 people in the boat and were allowed 6 silvers per person per day. Smallest Coho we caught was 8 lbs. We weren't netting though. We were out sport fishing. We had limits of pinks, silvers, and a couple kings in the boat within 2 hrs and headed to the halibut and rockfish holes. This past summer we missed the schools, but still ended up with some nice silvers in the 9-14 lbs range and some pinks around 6-7 lbs.

Offline huntnphool

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Re: Salmon fishing/Not likley
« Reply #50 on: December 18, 2017, 04:56:44 PM »
I also have a question about this subject. How is it that the Average salmon caught in Alaska is much bigger than in Washington state if all of the salmon we get back are coming from all the way up there? I'm speaking from experience btw. I lived in Alaska for a short time and fished there as much as I could. The average Coho up there is 10+ lbs and the average king is 20+ lbs.. here in Washington that's a much smaller number. Another thing I have to ask about is that Pink salmon run every year in Alaska whereas here in Washington we get a run every other year. how does that make sense? I get that some of our fish go that far north but I feel like most of our salmon go mainly up into Canadian waters or just further out into the ocean. I could be completely wrong... but then again in all the years I have fished Washington state I have only pulled up a hand full of kings that were 20 lbs or more and silvers are 6-8 lbs if you are lucky. The pinks we caught up there were also bigger. 8-10 lbs average! The pinks we get down here are like 3-5 lbs. Just my  :twocents: but feel free to fill me in if you have any info. I love salmon fishing and will continue to do so in the future.. just not in Washington state, unless its the hump or if I go with a charter on the Columbia lol. Btw, I'm talking sport fishing more than netting and yes I know there is a big difference in catch. My biggest king is a hair under 40 lbs and that was in Canada up on Queen Charlotte island and my biggest silver was while I was living in Ketchikan, Alaska and it was 16 lbs. I WANT TO GO BACK!  :chuckle:

Genetics. ;) Just because two people eat the same food at the same table, does not necessarily mean they are going to grow to be the same size.

 Fish may travel to the same feeding grounds, doesn't mean those two fish don't come from different parts of the world or different parents. :twocents:
The things that come to those who wait, may be the things left by those who got there first!

Offline W_Ellison2011

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Re: Salmon fishing/Not likley
« Reply #51 on: December 18, 2017, 06:12:23 PM »
I also have a question about this subject. How is it that the Average salmon caught in Alaska is much bigger than in Washington state if all of the salmon we get back are coming from all the way up there? I'm speaking from experience btw. I lived in Alaska for a short time and fished there as much as I could. The average Coho up there is 10+ lbs and the average king is 20+ lbs.. here in Washington that's a much smaller number. Another thing I have to ask about is that Pink salmon run every year in Alaska whereas here in Washington we get a run every other year. how does that make sense? I get that some of our fish go that far north but I feel like most of our salmon go mainly up into Canadian waters or just further out into the ocean. I could be completely wrong... but then again in all the years I have fished Washington state I have only pulled up a hand full of kings that were 20 lbs or more and silvers are 6-8 lbs if you are lucky. The pinks we caught up there were also bigger. 8-10 lbs average! The pinks we get down here are like 3-5 lbs. Just my  :twocents: but feel free to fill me in if you have any info. I love salmon fishing and will continue to do so in the future.. just not in Washington state, unless its the hump or if I go with a charter on the Columbia lol. Btw, I'm talking sport fishing more than netting and yes I know there is a big difference in catch. My biggest king is a hair under 40 lbs and that was in Canada up on Queen Charlotte island and my biggest silver was while I was living in Ketchikan, Alaska and it was 16 lbs. I WANT TO GO BACK!  :chuckle:

Genetics. ;) Just because two people eat the same food at the same table, does not necessarily mean they are going to grow to be the same size.

 Fish may travel to the same feeding grounds, doesn't mean those two fish don't come from different parts of the world or different parents. :twocents:
True and I would say the majority of what we catch up there is unclipped so I would assume naturals. God I need to go back soon and get some salmon for my smoker and bbq!

Offline fish vacuum

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Re: Salmon fishing/Not likley
« Reply #52 on: December 21, 2017, 03:59:03 AM »
I also have a question about this subject. How is it that the Average salmon caught in Alaska is much bigger than in Washington state if all of the salmon we get back are coming from all the way up there? I'm speaking from experience btw. I lived in Alaska for a short time and fished there as much as I could. The average Coho up there is 10+ lbs and the average king is 20+ lbs.. here in Washington that's a much smaller number. Another thing I have to ask about is that Pink salmon run every year in Alaska whereas here in Washington we get a run every other year. how does that make sense? I get that some of our fish go that far north but I feel like most of our salmon go mainly up into Canadian waters or just further out into the ocean. I could be completely wrong... but then again in all the years I have fished Washington state I have only pulled up a hand full of kings that were 20 lbs or more and silvers are 6-8 lbs if you are lucky. The pinks we caught up there were also bigger. 8-10 lbs average! The pinks we get down here are like 3-5 lbs. Just my  :twocents: but feel free to fill me in if you have any info. I love salmon fishing and will continue to do so in the future.. just not in Washington state, unless its the hump or if I go with a charter on the Columbia lol. Btw, I'm talking sport fishing more than netting and yes I know there is a big difference in catch. My biggest king is a hair under 40 lbs and that was in Canada up on Queen Charlotte island and my biggest silver was while I was living in Ketchikan, Alaska and it was 16 lbs. I WANT TO GO BACK!  :chuckle:
I'm gonna guess your coho experience in WA is mostly hatchery fish?

Offline W_Ellison2011

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Re: Salmon fishing/Not likley
« Reply #53 on: December 21, 2017, 03:23:47 PM »
I also have a question about this subject. How is it that the Average salmon caught in Alaska is much bigger than in Washington state if all of the salmon we get back are coming from all the way up there? I'm speaking from experience btw. I lived in Alaska for a short time and fished there as much as I could. The average Coho up there is 10+ lbs and the average king is 20+ lbs.. here in Washington that's a much smaller number. Another thing I have to ask about is that Pink salmon run every year in Alaska whereas here in Washington we get a run every other year. how does that make sense? I get that some of our fish go that far north but I feel like most of our salmon go mainly up into Canadian waters or just further out into the ocean. I could be completely wrong... but then again in all the years I have fished Washington state I have only pulled up a hand full of kings that were 20 lbs or more and silvers are 6-8 lbs if you are lucky. The pinks we caught up there were also bigger. 8-10 lbs average! The pinks we get down here are like 3-5 lbs. Just my  :twocents: but feel free to fill me in if you have any info. I love salmon fishing and will continue to do so in the future.. just not in Washington state, unless its the hump or if I go with a charter on the Columbia lol. Btw, I'm talking sport fishing more than netting and yes I know there is a big difference in catch. My biggest king is a hair under 40 lbs and that was in Canada up on Queen Charlotte island and my biggest silver was while I was living in Ketchikan, Alaska and it was 16 lbs. I WANT TO GO BACK!  :chuckle:
I'm gonna guess your coho experience in WA is mostly hatchery fish?
I have caught a fair few "native" silver salmon in the Hump. Tossed them all back. They were decent sized but none were pushing above 8-10 lbs class.

Offline Skillet

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Re: Salmon fishing/Not likley
« Reply #54 on: December 21, 2017, 06:45:51 PM »
Getting back to this thread - I wanted to make a few comments before I addressed some of the issues that popped up here (thanks for the tag @Duckslayer89).

First and foremost, I make my living killing fish and selling them.  No hidden agenda here, I need a supply of fish to kill and sell.  Right off the bat, this makes me an adversary of some here, since they are not commercial fisherman and see commercial fisherman as direct competition for a limited resource.  I get that, this is a sportsman's forum.  As a sport fisherman for over the three-plus decades before I took the jump into commercial fishing, I can still see that side of things fairly well. 

Second, as I age I am getting more and more accepting that I don't know every damn thing about everything.  It allows me to listen to others who might disagree with me and instead of trying to figure out a way to prove them wrong, listen to what they are actually saying.  I get irritated with trying to have a discussion with someone who is only there to push their beliefs or position.  Even the ones who agree with me.  If I wanted to be preached at, I'd go to church. 

Thirdly, I am a data guy.  I have opinions and expect others will have them too, but I differentiate between the two.  I prefer the numbers, I can rely on the data.  It is much easier to have a rational, intelligent conversation with other folks when they also appreciate a reliance on data and understand the difference between fact and opinion.  However, even good data can be interpreted, slanted, and manipulated to make any argument one wants to put forth.  And data only really is just data.  The discussion is always - what does it mean and what can we/should we do with it?  Which brings me to the last point -

I am a skeptic when cherry-picked data is presented to support a position.  If data supporting dams on rivers comes from the Bonneville Power Administration's fluff public relations literature, I instantly think "what data regarding the damage they're doing is left out?"  In dealing with the sometimes disingenuous standard practices of fish politics, I've been learning to dig deeper, no matter whether what I am hearing from the presenter is reinforcing my beliefs or not.  I've already gotten a comment from a board member about "staying on message with the Troller's Association" during ADFG Advisory Board meetings.  I take that to mean I'm doing something right...

The point of these comments is to inform my fellow HuntWa'ers that may not share my point of view that I am here to share, listen, learn and show respect to those who are willing to have a rational discussion.  Fish politics can get so heated it makes wolf politics look like child's play, imho.  I have a serious investment on the line, and that makes it real to me.  Maybe most here don't care enough to get worked up about it, and that's cool.  Some of us do.  Guys like WSU and I might be on completely opposite ends of the spectrum when it comes to how we should approach some fish stocks, or what different stakeholders are entitled to.  But, I have respect for his ability to put forth his argument in a thoughtful way, and seek out his opinions as a point for me to consider.  There is room for both disagreement and respect between two groups who don't vilify the members of the other group.  It's easy to pick out a bad apple and paint the rest of the opposition with that brush, but it is almost never an accurate picture you end up with.

Sermon over   :tup:

Skillet - if you look at the numbers, the SE AK troll harvests heavily on a lot of southern stocks. Iíd bet youíve caught fish from a lot of interesting places.

I fished the north tip of queen Charlotte island this summer.  Like se ak, Iím sure the kings were a big mix of south bound fish. It was interesting to look at the kings and how different they look from stock to stock. Iíve seen it here in Washington obviously but it was interesting to look at dozens of kings over 4 days. We caught one that Iíd bet money was hatchery tule, some that looked like urbs and some a variety of other stocks.

The Fairweather Grounds are an interesting place.  A big offshore plateau out in the NE corner of the Gulf of Alaska.  Extremely rich in feed, it draws predators from all over. Some of those are kings from as far south as the Sacramento River (and probably farther if there are any runs south of the Sacramento).  Since the Big C is probably the dominant supplier of kings into the Western Eastern Pacific, it would stand to reason we catch them up there too.  I'll have to see what my pit tag data shows as far as Big C % of catch, if I can dig them up soon. 

There is some dock chatter about how you can tell the southern fish from the northern fish, but I'm not sure about that.  There are clearly different color variations of kings, and I'd wager they are associated with runs though.  As commercial fisherman, we get to spend a LOT of time trying to make sense of the fish we are pursuing, using whatever observations and imagination we can apply.  I've heard some real whoppers, and the guys telling them are totally convinced of their theory since they've spent the last three months solo on the boat believing it.   :chuckle:
« Last Edit: December 21, 2017, 07:16:12 PM by Skillet »
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Offline Skillet

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Re: Salmon fishing/Not likley
« Reply #55 on: December 21, 2017, 07:04:16 PM »
Jh - the numbers donít lie.

And by harvesting juveniles, I mean that all those smaller kings caught over the 3 years they are feeding up north arenít nature yet. Theyíd be a lot bigger if we let them grow another 2 or 4 years.

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0130184

This journal identifies a troubling trend, but is seems the kings are returning much earlier - and smaller - on average.  A five-year fish is getting to be very long in the tooth, relatively, to its schoolmates.

As an anecdote, I'm always curious about the state of gonad development in the fish I catch (when eggs get big enough I keep them to sell to bait companies).  By July 1, the rest of that year's spawning class is pretty well invested in starting to increase the gonad size.  It is true I do catch the occasional fish with gonads that look like they still do in the winter fish I'm catching now, (which I can presume to be either a very late-returning spawning year king or a juvenile), but it is really an uncommon event.
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Offline Skillet

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Re: Salmon fishing/Not likley
« Reply #56 on: December 21, 2017, 07:12:10 PM »
I think most of the AK fish stay near AK, some head over toward Russia and northern Japan.  The maps I remember seeing had the WA fish that were closest to the coast going to the Western Gulf of Alaska.  The Puget Sound fish going more toward the central part.  Lower Columbia river fish going more to the SE Gulf and around Northern British Columbia.  The fish that would hang around off the WA and OR coasts had a lot from Idaho and way up the Columbia, and lots from California/S Oregon.

This is similar to what I've been told, in that the fish outmigrate to where the feed is.  If BC, and then SE AK, doesn't hold them, they keep going west.  I know there is a fair bit of animosity against the pollock draggers in the GOA for harvesting MORE king salmon as bycatch than all of the gear groups in SE AK combined.  The kings that don't hangup in the Eastern GOA head west and feed on the massive schools of pollock out there. 

BUT - pollock is the biggest fish business in AK.  And dragging is the only way to get them.  A couple hundred thousands kings a year as bycatch is acceptable, says their immensely powerful lobbying group! Who wants king when you could have a tasty fish stick?   :chuckle:
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Offline plugger

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Re: Salmon fishing/Not likley
« Reply #57 on: December 21, 2017, 08:11:04 PM »
Having grown up Port Angeles and spending pretty much every waking hour on the rivers or on the straights, I have a few observations, Right or wrong. I moved to E wa when they first closed things down so some of this comes from my old fishing partners as I pretty much quit  going over a few years back. average size of kings back in the 80's, 17 to 20 lbs with good numbers of fish in the 25 to 35 range. Now 8 to 12 in the straights, 20lbers seem to be rare. We figure that if you take your hatchery fish for production at the same time every year, which seems to be the earliest fish, then your runs will, over time be earlier. If you also pick out the smaller fish, then they over time, they will be smaller? Didn't Take fisheries  or anything like that, But I don't think its as complicated as some want to make it.  :twocents:

Offline Skillet

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Re: Salmon fishing/Not likley
« Reply #58 on: December 21, 2017, 08:39:34 PM »
There is a lot of factors at play.  That's what makes managing these fish for MSY (Maximum Sustainable Yield, as per the Alaska Constitution) a very difficult task.  The really odd thing is that the wild fish in most rivers are coming back on average a full 1 or 2 years earlier than previously assumed.   Is it that the fishing fleet is hammering the later fish before they get in the river?  Warmer ocean speeding maturity?  Lack of feed?  The what if's are limitless.

It would be easy for me, as a commercial guy, to want to have the "ocean conditions" be the only reason (btw, "ocean conditions" is the catch-all for scientists to use when they just don't know).  But I tend to agree with you - human interaction with the runs are causing this in some respect, but I don't know what it is.  The wild runs being early and small as well suggests to me it is a bigger problem than hatchery management.   
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Offline Skillet

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Re: Salmon fishing/Not likley
« Reply #59 on: December 21, 2017, 08:55:16 PM »
I also have a question about this subject. How is it that the Average salmon caught in Alaska is much bigger than in Washington state if all of the salmon we get back are coming from all the way up there? I'm speaking from experience btw. I lived in Alaska for a short time and fished there as much as I could. The average Coho up there is 10+ lbs and the average king is 20+ lbs.. here in Washington that's a much smaller number. Another thing I have to ask about is that Pink salmon run every year in Alaska whereas here in Washington we get a run every other year. how does that make sense? I get that some of our fish go that far north but I feel like most of our salmon go mainly up into Canadian waters or just further out into the ocean. I could be completely wrong... but then again in all the years I have fished Washington state I have only pulled up a hand full of kings that were 20 lbs or more and silvers are 6-8 lbs if you are lucky. The pinks we caught up there were also bigger. 8-10 lbs average! The pinks we get down here are like 3-5 lbs. Just my  :twocents: but feel free to fill me in if you have any info. I love salmon fishing and will continue to do so in the future.. just not in Washington state, unless its the hump or if I go with a charter on the Columbia lol. Btw, I'm talking sport fishing more than netting and yes I know there is a big difference in catch. My biggest king is a hair under 40 lbs and that was in Canada up on Queen Charlotte island and my biggest silver was while I was living in Ketchikan, Alaska and it was 16 lbs. I WANT TO GO BACK!  :chuckle:

10+ pound average is far fetched. I worked on a salmon tender throughout the whole troll season in SE Alaska and saw 10s of thousands of coho I think the average was 5-7 pounds as the season got later.
@skillet%
We had 4 people in the boat and were allowed 6 silvers per person per day. Smallest Coho we caught was 8 lbs. We weren't netting though. We were out sport fishing. We had limits of pinks, silvers, and a couple kings in the boat within 2 hrs and headed to the halibut and rockfish holes. This past summer we missed the schools, but still ended up with some nice silvers in the 9-14 lbs range and some pinks around 6-7 lbs.

There are yearly and regional variances of coho size up here, but I'm primarily with Duckslayer on this one.  I haven't seen the volume of fish he has in one season, but I've seen seasons worth of coho come over my gunnels now.    The fish W_Ellison is remembering likely came from Mt. Point and Clover Point areas, correct?  Those fish are primarily from the Neets Bay hatchery, and they have a particularly large strain of coho.  Not quite Stikine river size, but notably large.   Even year coho up here have been notably larger than the odd year fish as well. 

I fished those Ketchikan area coho for a solid summer (2014) and started out in July with a 5.3# average wt on my first delivery (all my ice delivery weights are gilled & gutted weight - 88% of a round fish on average).  The fishing was insanely good, and they were big.  At the end of the season in mid-Sept, they were 7.1# average, with 10#+ not uncommon in there.  I probably caught a couple dozen teeners in Sept that year, big fish dressed at 14.5#.

2015 was a small-fish year, and coho were not as consistent.  July started out under 5# average in the Ketchikan area, then I moved out to the coast and fished the Craig area.  That area is served by the Klawock hatchery, and those fish were small compared to the Neets fish.  It took until mid-August to get in the 6# average range, and I only had one delivery in Sept over 7# average.  Big coho that year was 15.2#. 

2016 was a monster sized coho year.  I had the bigger boat and could range far and wide for them.  I started the season on the Fairweather Grounds and was really happy to see my coho coming on at over a 6# average.  Great start to the year. They got thin in late July and early August (they always seem to out on the coast), but came on strong in late Aug and Sept.  My last delivery was over a 9# average, which is crazy big average for coho.  My biggest coho that year was 16.2# - Round weight that was a conservative 18+#.

2017 was a tiny coho year, big contrast to the year before.  The numbers, though, broke the previous records for total return.  I caught couple thousand more fish than I did the year before, but they were just small... and cleaning a 3# coho is a real drag (isn't that right, @captkyle97  :chuckle:).  I didn't get over a 6# average delivery until late in Sept this year.  I did land several 11-12#'ers, a couple 13's and one 14# (dressed wts).  The bigs came mostly from one week in Sept that were pushing into Cross Sound, clearly a larger system run in that biomass.

That's just my data, take it for what it's worth.

Pinks are an every other year fishery up there, they just don't swarm the inside on the even years like they do on the odd years.  It could have something to do with the coho sizes being larger on the off pink years - that number of pinks out there can really eat up some feed.  :dunno:  I can't speak to pink salmon size, they aren't allowed on my boat!
KABOOM Count - 1

"The ocean is calling, and I must go."

 

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