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Author Topic: Pup obidience  (Read 332 times)

Offline riflehunter

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Pup obidience
« on: January 02, 2018, 09:20:50 AM »
I have a 6month old GSP. I can tell she is smart and gets what I am saying but doesn't seem to want to come to my commands I constantly work with her 10-15 mins at a time 3-4 times a day, but once she gets distracted or frankly just doesn't want to come when called. Is there any pointers anyone has on getting dogs to focus and training methods I've watched several videos and have talked to a trainer but nothing seems to be sticking.

Offline Skyvalhunter

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Re: Pup obidience
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2018, 09:30:02 AM »
I use and started my dog out with a shock collar. Younger dogs are particularly vulnerable to tunnel vision and using the shock collar really helped. My collars have 3 choices, one a beeping noise, a short shock and one a continuous shock all of which are controlled by the transmitter. You can control the level of the shock. I am not saying you need to shock your dog all the time or even have it turned up that high but it does allow you to control your dog and help with the training weather you whistle train them, hand signals or voice. :twocents:

Offline vandeman17

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Re: Pup obidience
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2018, 09:33:33 AM »
How are you rewarding her when she does well? I always used treats to reward good actions and small corrections for bad ones. I also made sure to pay attention to their body language and would quit when they lost interest. Then follow it up with something they enjoy so they think its fun and not work.
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Offline riflehunter

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Re: Pup obidience
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2018, 09:38:15 AM »
she is very treat oriented and will do almost everything if I have a treat when I run out of treats or I go one time without a treat she will then give up and continue like if I'm not getting a treat then there is no point. She gets a treat for doing it right and also a lot of verbal praise. I do have a shock collar that she does train well with I was just hoping I didn't have to rely on that. When we are done training I will play and let her relax and I am notice when she has lost interest and usually stop then I feel like I should be farther along then I am and want to make sure she is ready to go for the next season. I do little bird work now just to break up the monotony of the same thing plus she has a super killer instinct so she loves that training but feel like I cant get to carried away with that until I can rely on obidience

Offline Skyvalhunter

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Re: Pup obidience
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2018, 09:43:21 AM »
You also might cut down the number of times you are training her. 3 or 4 times a day might be a bit much as at that age they get bored easily. One, maybe 2 sessions a day should suffice

Offline vandeman17

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Re: Pup obidience
« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2018, 10:00:43 AM »
my cousin, who is a professional hunting dog trainer, said something to me a long time ago that resonated with me. A dog should always know who is the master and who is the worker and that they should have the slightest bit of fear (for lack of a better term) of you as far as right and wrong goes. Similar to how a child respects the power of their parents. What I am getting at is if she only works for treats, corrections are needed to establish that she doesn't get to choose when to obey and when not to.
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Offline tlbradford

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Re: Pup obidience
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2018, 12:37:15 PM »
she is very treat oriented and will do almost everything if I have a treat when I run out of treats or I go one time without a treat she will then give up and continue like if I'm not getting a treat then there is no point. She gets a treat for doing it right and also a lot of verbal praise. I do have a shock collar that she does train well with I was just hoping I didn't have to rely on that. When we are done training I will play and let her relax and I am notice when she has lost interest and usually stop then I feel like I should be farther along then I am and want to make sure she is ready to go for the next season. I do little bird work now just to break up the monotony of the same thing plus she has a super killer instinct so she loves that training but feel like I cant get to carried away with that until I can rely on obidience

I never use treats for this reason.  Always a ruffle of the ears, or a pat, and a good dog.  You can't allow for disobedience when giving a command.  You can go with a pinch collar, or a shock collar if you have to, but you are better off making them do what you want, without them knowing you are doing the correction.  At six months I would only be teaching stay, come, and introducing whoa.  Other than that, I getting them comfortable on a leash, in their kennel, and around other animals.  I'm also introducing them to water during their entire first year, however that is being done in a fun manner as play, and not forced.  Don't get heavy handed with corrections, because the number one thing with a pointer is to keep that drive at 100%.  A submissive dog will mind and be controlled, but won't compare with a dog that is having fun while hunting.  I use a post and a flank rope when teaching whoa.  There are a ton of videos on youtube.  I loved the Delmar Smith book for training pointers.  The Huntsmith videos use the silent training commands as well, but with ecollars.  I will be going electronic on my next dog rather than voice and hand signals, merely for the fact that late season birds do not hardly tolerate any noise.
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Offline slowhand

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Re: Pup obidience
« Reply #7 on: January 06, 2018, 12:26:35 PM »
Wow, So much I want to say here.
#1 Don't start with the shock collar? That is a horrible idea. I have seen what happens.
You will either have a dog with a broken spirit :( (I think We have all seen one of those in the field before)
Or a dog that shuts down during training and just tries to hide under your feet.
#2 They are all different
Some dogs just have it from day one, some will really never have it at the level We want them to. Every one of them comes with instinct and the genes from their parents (good to bad. High dollar to mutt) After that it's completely up to us to teach them right from wrong.
I always remember when they are that age that they are a big piece of clay and He or She will be what I make them into. Go slow, one lesson at a time. If You go to fast or push the pressure up to high. Well damage can occur. It's better to keep at it but some times that means tomorrow.
My favorite Dog Trainer (RC) "pack a lunch when Your training a dog" It takes time and most of all patients.
#3 Food driven dogs are By far the easiest to train. Keep the treats coming as long as they are performing correctly. No treats for almost. add in a clicker used when the treat is given.
Pro Tip, I bring along a pack of Hot dogs as a secret weapon if needed. Kimber Loves a small Piece of hotdog. He will put cream and sugar in your coffee for a small piece.
#4 Do you use a release command at the finish of training. I make a big fuss when I finish training. I wait after the last command (sit) for a good time 60 seconds at that age.
Then I say "break!" and get all excited like the Seahawks just won the superbowl.
lots of pets maybe a surprise piece of hotdog, bit of wresling. He loves it and I believe looks forward to it during training. A reason to do a good job
I always finish on a perfectly exacuted command. I don't care if it's sit stay heal or kennel.
I always make it a surprise maybe really early today or after a command He doesn't Like (lay down flat head on the ground).
#5 someone else said this but I want to touch on it again. When It's work time (training) they have to stay focused and listen. Pro tip, Use a long lead like 50' if needed. Correction when needed. I just give a light tap to his hip or side with a firm finger. nothing painful, just a reminder that was wrong Let's go back and do that over from exactly where it went wrong.
one Last thing the good boy or treat or pat for a job well done during training needs to be small and quick. To much good job diminishes the well done to nothing special.

I hope some of that helps. Good luck with Your Dog.
I find that the ones that love You do much better than the ones that fear You.
Easy way to tell, Stop your dog out away from You, Tell them to sit, quickly walk right up to them and raise Your hand. If they cower (You broke their spirit) If they are excited and tail is wagging (They love You). If they don't really love You? Well don't forget to work on that part too. It's just as important.
 
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Offline Rudy

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Re: Pup obidience
« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2018, 03:54:01 PM »
I've been watching some youtube videos from a guy named Stonnie Dennis (who runs a kennel in Kentucky) and incorporating his lessons in my training of our new yellow lab pup.  To me, he has a really good approach and it works for me and my personality.  His number one thing is to make sure you keep the dog WANTING to do things with you, and excited to go to work.  Might be worth it to check them out?
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