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Author Topic: Pheasant populations  (Read 11935 times)

sisu

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Pheasant populations
« on: June 03, 2007, 08:25:10 AM »
I had this added to the end of the bear shooting thread and decided to remove it and put it here. They are related some what but it needed to be split. I'd like to know you thoughts on this issue and what could be done to help numbers. I know weather is a big factor in the equation, but some of the items mentioned below are a cause and effect factor. Aside weather what are you thoughts on the issue.

Washington outlawed trapping in 1999 (am I correct on the date). With that outcome, does it coincide with the pheasant population decline on the east side? If so would this relate to an increase in skunk and raccoon population? (crows and magpies pose a big problem for pheasant eggs and young chick also).
Also do we have a feral cat problem in Washington? Cats, even the one that returns home everyday can pose a big problem for wild birds.
Next have our farmers switched from small grains to row crops like soy and corn? The lack of protective nesting will allow birds, like I mentioned above, to access the nesting areas for easy food (eggs and chicks).


 


Offline Idabooner

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2007, 10:18:22 AM »
In my area there's a big problem with dogs running loose. Not so much the local ones, but the visitors that come to the country with their city dog, all this space, lets turn fido loose to run and have some fun. In seconds fido is on the trail of some thing, do you know how long it takes for him to ruin a bird nest? >:( The occasional local dog that gets out of hand and all feral cats have a way of not getting home. ;) Starlings are another thing that gets nests and kills young, I don't think so much for food but to eliminate the competition for food. Ravens are very bad here also, over a few years they have even almost eliminated the magpie and crows. 10 days ago I seen the ravens making a big fuss by some bushes, the next day and for a few days there was a turkey hen just wondering around in that area, it's not hard to guess what took place. Now lets add some humor, I was sitting by an open window this morning before sun up practicing some rolls on the banjo, I heard a strange sound, and there 3 ft. on the other side was this turkey hen listening. :dunno: :dunno:

Online boneaddict

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2007, 12:43:05 PM »
I live right ouside of urban sprawl.  Its one of the first dirt roads I think witha big turn around area, so a ton, and I mean a ton of cats get dumped off.  I raise pheasants, so guess where the dinner bell is ringing.  I kill at a minimium a cat per week that is not the local pets.  I have an agreement with the nieghbors that I won't mess with their pet.  Dogs are another issue.  Not as bad as with Idabooner because I have my place pig fenced.  I also think you have a point with skunks and coons.  They have to eat something, and they won't be discriminate.  I know the new governor had problems with coons and coyotes messing with her fido.  heheheheheeeee   if it hadn't cost taxpayers so much for her to be calling in the state patrol to guard her dog from coyotes, It would have been REALLY funny.

sisu

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #3 on: June 03, 2007, 07:28:15 PM »
... Starlings are another thing that gets nests and kills young, ...
I saw a recipe for a fly that required starling feathers in an old tying book by Jacques Herter. Hummm I guess there are two reasons to knock off some starlings.

Online boneaddict

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2007, 07:34:06 PM »
There are several flies that use starling feathers, so there are a few more reasons to thin them down. ;)

Offline Choclab

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2007, 09:33:08 PM »
If you guys need some feathers, let me know...LOL. We kill around 50-100 a week ALL summer long. Pigeons too. Back to the topic, I kill the hell out of feral cats. Nasty little *censored*s sure can cause some destruction.
Eastsider stuck on the wetside......

Offline Otto1

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #6 on: June 03, 2007, 09:46:00 PM »
I am not to up to date on the upland bird management but from what I have been told is that the developement of farming practices and their efficencies have really put the hurt on the pheasant... No left over cover...

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #7 on: June 04, 2007, 06:10:53 AM »
I'm with you choclab, some people go to the range to skeet shoot, I use live clays.
Especially when the migration is on, they can't stand not trying to get a free meal of pheasant food.

Offline Choclab

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #8 on: June 04, 2007, 10:00:31 AM »
These new age farmers sure need to start practicing the methods their folks did. I remeber when I was a kid, farmers would leave rows of their crop on the edges of their fields for food and cover. Now you hardly see that anywhere, the kids harvest EVERYTHING. There could be some fantastic hunting, but they don't care.....anything for an extra buck
Eastsider stuck on the wetside......

Slenk

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #9 on: June 04, 2007, 02:03:08 PM »

"These new age farmers sure need to start practicing the methods their folks did. I remeber when I was a kid, farmers would leave rows of their crop on the edges of their fields for food and cover. Now you hardly see that anywhere, the kids harvest EVERYTHING. There could be some fantastic hunting, but they don't care.....anything for an extra buck"

Choclab
A few years ago I worked in the Ag.Retail Chemical, Fertilize (Whitman County) . As a feildman I watched the Farmers cut down trees and bulldoze out grass patches and hillsides for more grownd to be farmed . This was back in the 70s and 80s the first year after they started this there was a big decline of birds as well as deer . You can't reason with a farmer thinking he has to have more farm grownd ( I call it GREED) been there done that , it just don't work. After ther trees were cut and the grass areas were gone the little spring dried up also , so there was not the water for wildlife . Also I think urban development has a lot to do with the lack of wildlife of any kind .
I use the heck out of box traps that I build ,for cats, dogs , skunks Etc. ,whatever fits.
Slenk

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #10 on: June 04, 2007, 07:19:28 PM »
I came home to find the neighbors 2 irish setters working the brush and killing quail.  Awhile ago, they had all but run off all of the birds, quail chukars and pheasants.  They then came to my home and killed $600 of birds.  He was kind enough to pay me and then fence his damn dogs in.  The birds came back.  For some reason,right as the quail were about ready to hatch, he lets them out.  What a jerk wad.  >:( I stepped out and put one between their legs and they ran home to their concerned neighbor.  :boxin: I wonder if he will get thepoint.  I guess I could call the game department, but I think they are probably too busy to worry about some idiot and his dogs.

Offline WDFW-SUX

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #11 on: June 04, 2007, 07:34:36 PM »
County of Yakima: Animal Control
128 N 2nd St
Yakima, WA 98901

(509) 574-2420

Better than the game dept.
THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE SUCKS MORE THAN EVER..........

sisu

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #12 on: June 04, 2007, 08:06:13 PM »
I came home to find the neighbors 2 irish setters working the brush and killing quail.  Awhile ago, they had all but run off all of the birds, quail chukars and pheasants.  They then came to my home and killed $600 of birds.  He was kind enough to pay me and then fence his damn dogs in.  The birds came back.  For some reason,right as the quail were about ready to hatch, he lets them out.  What a jerk wad.  >:( I stepped out and put one between their legs and they ran home to their concerned neighbor.  :boxin: I wonder if he will get the point.  I guess I could call the game department, but I think they are probably too busy to worry about some idiot and his dogs.
Spritz, my first female Rottweiler, was trained to protect the house, children, and anyone else that was considered family. We had neighborhood dogs that  got in the garbage, *censored* on the lawn, ran through the garden etc. I tried passive ways of changing their routine, then resorted to #6 shot and/blunts shot by my wife from her bow. All but one dog responded to the negative attention. Finally one day this bearded collie came into our yard. I told Spritz to go on guard, in German while I cracked the front door. As soon as the door was open enough to allow the Spritz to blast I yelled, Nixon. This was her full on bite the snot out of target command. She hit that bearded collie so friggin' hard that they both did a 360 with Spritz attached to it's neck she held the dog on the ground until I told her to release.
End result: bearded collie treated our property like it was pure poison from then on. The dog would walk down the road come to our property turn to the other neighbor's property by pass us until it came to the fence line then head back to the road and go home. Spritz was the best Rott I ever owned she'd of died for our family if it would of been called upon her to do so.

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #13 on: June 05, 2007, 06:16:49 AM »
Awesome story!  I imagine that this guys going to have animal control called upon him in the form of a 180 grain Hornaday and an ace hardware shovel.  Little bit overkill for a setter, but this is getting ridiculous.  After I shot, he gathered up his dogs.  It wasn't an hour before they were back out at it.  He finally came out and started whistling and whistling and whistling while his dog was out of site to him, but right by my fence eating a quail and eggs she had discovered.  Being the non- agressive person I am, I just stood there with my arms crossed mad as hell.  He could tell I was pissed.  My wife said I should go talk to him.  I chose not to as I could sense a night in prison if I said one word to the guy.  Man I can get mad at some things.

Offline Otto1

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #14 on: June 05, 2007, 07:16:05 AM »
I I guess I could call the game department, but I think they are probably too busy to worry about some idiot and his dogs.

Now if you call them about this, before ya do make sure you have video footage of them killing and or harrassing otherwise you would not get a call back and it would be wasting your time and the DFW time

County of Yakima: Animal Control
128 N 2nd St
Yakima, WA 98901

(509) 574-2420

Better than the game dept.

Now that is some good advise!

Offline WDFW-SUX

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #15 on: June 05, 2007, 07:23:57 AM »
You can have his dogs charged with trespass and if it continues they will have them impounded:)
THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE SUCKS MORE THAN EVER..........

Slenk

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #16 on: June 05, 2007, 07:32:59 AM »
boneaddict
You do need to report this to the Game Dept. .
I know that it unlawful to let you birddog run loose in this maner or let a dog hurrass game animals .
Slenk

Offline jackelope

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #17 on: June 05, 2007, 08:38:00 AM »
Quote
These new age farmers sure need to start practicing the methods their folks did

I think in some, if not most cases, these guys are doing what they can to feed their families. i guess i'm not a farmer, nor do i claim to know much about farming, but what i do know is there's less and less money in it every year. they are more concerned with putting food on the table than keeping the pheasant populations up unfortunatley...scraping for every red cent they can. more and more land goes to CRP every year over in pomeroy which is good for wildlife and hunters, and i believe it's some guaranteed money for the farmers every year. BTW these would be dry-land farmers i'm tlaking about. no corn. one farmer i know in the southeast had to hire on people to farm his land so he could come to western washington to teach an AG class this year due to lack of $$$.

:fire.:

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Online boneaddict

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #18 on: June 05, 2007, 08:58:40 AM »
They are paying taxes on it, I would use it too.  It doesn't do them any good to have birds that all they do is damage their crops, especially deer.  Thats why many farmers around Davenport and so forth allow hunters to come and harvest deer.  They are so hard on their wheat crop etc.  I bet we as in the ones that make our living elsewhere love to come and enjoy the fruits of their labors though. 

sisu

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #19 on: June 21, 2007, 06:39:06 AM »
Last couple of days I have been avoiding a couple of roosters that seem to like playing dodge the truck. They get in the low run position and scoot across the road just in the nick of time.

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #20 on: June 21, 2007, 06:41:06 AM »
Reach out and grab a tail.  They are just going into their molt.  Keep an eye on them and you might get yourself some fresh fly tyeing material.

Offline Curly

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #21 on: June 21, 2007, 07:29:43 AM »
For you guys in Eastern Washington:  how do you think the pheasant population is going to be for hunting season this year?  Are you seeing more pheasants than last year? 
May I always be the kind of person my dog thinks I am.

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #22 on: June 21, 2007, 08:56:23 AM »
Not seeing very many hens with chicks, but the weather has been pretty good for them.  We have gotten some rains (devastating on babies) but I think the timing was good.  Quail are onto their second brood already with a pretty good first hatch.

Offline Curly

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #23 on: June 21, 2007, 10:43:39 AM »
I'm not sure if I'll go pheasant hunting this year.  My dog gets sore real easy now that he's 12 and if there aren't a bunch of birds I just might not go.  I don't think I want to hunt him for more than 2 hours a day.

I might just have to go a few times to the Western Wa release sites (even though I really don't like hunting birds on this side of the mountains). 
May I always be the kind of person my dog thinks I am.

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Shadow Cat

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Re: Pheasant populations
« Reply #24 on: July 19, 2007, 01:39:40 AM »
Bone, I don't know about Washington, but in Arizona, if you raise livestock (this includes birds) and animals attack, harm or kill, you have the LEGAL right to kill the animal. A livestock inspector can be your best friend or your worst enemy depending on what side you are on. I shot many dogs growing up. Two of the dogs belonged to a neighbor who happened to be a deputy warden at the local prison. He thought he was going to strong arm my family for me shooting his dogs and called the sheriff. I called the livestock inspector and he straightened out bothe the sheriff deputy and the bozo neighbor. Funny, I never saw another dog at his place after that...

 

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