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Author Topic: Putting in a small food plot  (Read 22098 times)

Offline police women of America

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Re: Putting in a small food plot
« Reply #30 on: May 16, 2015, 09:04:29 PM »
Put down your plants then add some Miracle Grow it could grow a tomato on concrete  :chuckle:
also rake the cleared areas before planting the seeds (even though I'm sure you already know that).
it should work out great!  :tup:
Hi, my name is Josie

Offline CP

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Re: Putting in a small food plot
« Reply #31 on: May 26, 2015, 01:18:27 PM »
Update:
Mixed results so far; thick in places but some spots have no growth at all but.  Overall itís growing slower than I expected.  The soil is inconsistent and where there are rotting cedar trees in the mix it seems to retard the growth.  The deer have found it and have plucked a couple of spots clean. 


Offline h20hunter

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Re: Putting in a small food plot
« Reply #32 on: May 26, 2015, 01:21:11 PM »
I'd say you can call that some early success.  :tup:

Offline jackelope

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Re: Putting in a small food plot
« Reply #33 on: May 26, 2015, 03:00:02 PM »
Update:
Mixed results so far; thick in places but some spots have no growth at all but.  Overall itís growing slower than I expected.  The soil is inconsistent and where there are rotting cedar trees in the mix it seems to retard the growth.  The deer have found it and have plucked a couple of spots clean.

I wonder if the acid added to the soil from the cedars is affecting the soil enough to hinder the seed from sprouting.
As cryder said....ph is too high.
 :dunno:
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" In today's instant gratification society, more and more pressure revolves around success and the measurement of one's prowess as a hunter by inches on a score chart or field photos produced on social media. Don't fall into the trap. Hunting is-and always will be- about the hunt, the adventure, the views, and time spent with close friends and family. " Ryan Hatfield

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Offline CP

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Re: Putting in a small food plot
« Reply #34 on: May 26, 2015, 03:31:25 PM »
Update:
Mixed results so far; thick in places but some spots have no growth at all but.  Overall itís growing slower than I expected.  The soil is inconsistent and where there are rotting cedar trees in the mix it seems to retard the growth.  The deer have found it and have plucked a couple of spots clean.

I wonder if the acid added to the soil from the cedars is affecting the soil enough to hinder the seed from sprouting.
As cryder said....ph is too high.
 :dunno:

Maybe - I know that I put cedar bark in the flower beds to keeps the weeds in check.   :dunno:

Offline Chesapeake

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Re: Putting in a small food plot
« Reply #35 on: May 26, 2015, 04:17:23 PM »
Acid is low PH, not high. Alkaline would be high. Cant say I've ever seen alkaline soil, but I don't go around testing lots of soil.

Cedar tree's drop a lot of limb ends creating acid soil due to the tannins in cedars.

I'd go lime (an alkaline) to neutralize the acid and bring the soil more toward a 7 ph and then add fertilizer.

Guess I already said that in this thread.

Offline KFhunter

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Re: Putting in a small food plot
« Reply #36 on: May 26, 2015, 04:19:58 PM »
If you get more serious do soil tests and add soil amendments like sulfur according to the results.   The problem with PH above 7ish is the plants can't draw potassium and phosphorous and manganese and die off.  You don't want anything over 7 or under 6 generally,  6 is 10 times more acidic than 7 and 100 times more acidic than 8.  Plants need a certain amount of acidity to utilize the minerals mentioned - depending on the plant.  You can plant in around cedar trees, but you'll need soil amendments to do it properly. 

Also just don't guess and spread out soil amendments as you can really change the soil wildly, it's like adding chemicals to a hot tub...little bit too much of this then a little bit too much of that.... and next thing you know you've got a cocktail of chemicals in your tub and you gotta drain and start all over. 



« Last Edit: May 26, 2015, 04:34:12 PM by KFhunter »

Offline CP

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Re: Putting in a small food plot
« Reply #37 on: July 06, 2015, 08:42:53 AM »
 Itís pretty much all dried up now.  Need rain soon or this is a bust.

Offline huntingbaldguy

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Re: Putting in a small food plot
« Reply #38 on: July 09, 2015, 02:17:21 AM »
Can you take a drum in there and attach a garden hose to it and give it a little water?

Offline CP

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Re: Putting in a small food plot
« Reply #39 on: July 14, 2015, 08:43:50 AM »
I hauled some water in trash can on the ATV and watered with a bucket.  Too little, too late probably but we will see.  Still no rain in sight.


Offline Jonathan_S

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Re: Putting in a small food plot
« Reply #40 on: July 14, 2015, 09:14:27 AM »
I hauled some water in trash can on the ATV and watered with a bucket.  Too little, too late probably but we will see.  Still no rain in sight.

Not too late, too early.  Clover is something to plant in the fall  :tup:  Give it another shot in October.  Broadcast some seed and judge the results next year.  Clover relies on a pretty significant root structure.
ďKindly do not attempt to cloud the issue with too many facts.Ē

Offline CP

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Re: Putting in a small food plot
« Reply #41 on: July 14, 2015, 09:39:29 AM »
Iíll do that. 

I thought getting it in early, as soon as the snow melted, was key.  If this crop doesnít work Iíll try again for next year and be ready with soil tests, fertilizer and some means of irrigation.  Maybe switch clover varieties.  I see some natural clover patches nearby and they all seem to be arrowleaf. 

Offline Maverick

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Re: Putting in a small food plot
« Reply #42 on: August 01, 2015, 06:01:56 PM »
tagging. great post!

Offline CP

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Re: Putting in a small food plot
« Reply #43 on: May 02, 2016, 12:27:25 PM »
Tough winter this year.  Several trees down - snapped off under snow load and high winds.   I'll have to clear them out and clean the plot up to try again.


Offline fishnfur

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Re: Putting in a small food plot
« Reply #44 on: May 03, 2016, 10:02:36 AM »
At least you've got firewood to cook that elk with.

Perhaps just a bunch of apple trees would be best if the clearing gets direct sunlight.  You'll have to cage them for several years.  I had an elk clip the top of one of my 3 year-old apple trees at about the 6.5 foot level.  He smashed the chicken wire fencing and bent a T post getting up there to get that single bite.
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