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Author Topic: To GPS or not to GPS  (Read 2066 times)

Online Stein

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Re: To GPS or not to GPS
« Reply #50 on: June 19, 2017, 09:31:50 AM »
What do you all use your GPS for? I just get out and hike, hunt, evaluate the terrain while I'm there. Beforehand I do look at aerial images and get an idea where I'm going, but after that I just go out and do it. Sometimes I use my phone to mark a point, but thats it.

About 90% of the time, I am using it to see where I am in relation to the boundary between where I hunt and where I can't.  The other 10% is figuring out where the nearest road/trail is to get out, how far I am from the truck, updated weather info or something like that.

When I am hunting a boundary, I might have it in my had for an extended period of time, several hours sometimes.  When I'm not on a boundary, I might check it once or twice a day for a few seconds.

Offline Dhoey07

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Re: To GPS or not to GPS
« Reply #51 on: June 19, 2017, 09:37:37 AM »
What do you all use your GPS for? I just get out and hike, hunt, evaluate the terrain while I'm there. Beforehand I do look at aerial images and get an idea where I'm going, but after that I just go out and do it. Sometimes I use my phone to mark a point, but thats it.

99% off the time I don't use it.  When I do, it's to mark a location of my trail cam, kill spot, good looking sign, wallow, bedding area, etc.
 
Marking the truck is something I usually do as well. 

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Re: To GPS or not to GPS
« Reply #52 on: June 19, 2017, 09:44:39 AM »
What do you all use your GPS for? I just get out and hike, hunt, evaluate the terrain while I'm there. Beforehand I do look at aerial images and get an idea where I'm going, but after that I just go out and do it. Sometimes I use my phone to mark a point, but thats it.

Hunting new areas. Tracking hit animals. Finding out the shortest route to the road from a downed animal. Finding my buddy who's let me know he's in trouble or needs assistance (big deal with us old guys). Finding my way in thick fog when I can't recognize my surroundings. It's also my radio and weather radio.
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Offline boneaddict

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Re: To GPS or not to GPS
« Reply #53 on: June 19, 2017, 10:18:02 AM »
Assuming you have orienteering skills and keep a map and compass on you, why would someone not use a good GPS all the time? I can use an abacus, but I much prefer to do payroll using a computer.  :dunno:

Weight and loss of "experience"

I teach map skills to kids. I'll never lose the experience. I can't imagine that anyone would forget to know how to use a map and compass once they know how.  :dunno: Weight? Not a big factor for me. If it gets to be, I shouldn't have any trouble losing another 12 oz!  :)


Not what I meant by experience exactly.   Ever like to take a step back to what it was like? Along the lines of less tech is better.  As Bob said, to each is own.  I just was trying to answer your question.   
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Re: To GPS or not to GPS
« Reply #54 on: June 19, 2017, 10:33:50 AM »
What do you all use your GPS for? I just get out and hike, hunt, evaluate the terrain while I'm there. Beforehand I do look at aerial images and get an idea where I'm going, but after that I just go out and do it. Sometimes I use my phone to mark a point, but thats it.

I use mine mainly for waypoints, back trail.
I mark kill sights, trails points (where I leave a trail), intersections, nice hunting spots, whether I saw deer/elk how many etc...
When I get home, I load my tracks into Basecamp, and document what I saw (deer other critters), weather, etc.
I have a pretty good historical collection of the areas I have hunted over years.
Then I also upload waypoints and tracks that I have researched before my hunt.

I still breakout the compass now and then to knock the rust off, LOL
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Re: To GPS or not to GPS
« Reply #55 on: June 19, 2017, 10:59:17 AM »
It's certainly a decision that each hunter makes.  As long as it is legal, "right" is in the eyes of each hunter.  After all, we all use a heavy dose of technology - everyone drives the animal home in a vehicle and puts it in a freezer.  Most of us use a rifle, carbon fiber bows & arrows, binoculars, scopes, range finders, synthetic clothes, packs, tents, fuel and an endless amount of stuff that wasn't available even short while ago historically speaking.

Some of us want the greatest opportunity at killing a legal animal.  Some of us want a specific experience (or budget!) and thus only employ certain technology while not using other technology.

Heck, for a big bunch of people on the planet today, a compass and map is high-tech.

Offline andrew_in_idaho

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Re: To GPS or not to GPS
« Reply #56 on: June 19, 2017, 11:08:32 AM »
Something Iíve used a GPS for on multiple occasions is creating a waypoint for an animal Iím hunting, and making a blind stalk. I range the animal, take a bearing on it, and plug the waypoint into my GPS. I can then ďgo toĒ the animalís waypoint staying completely out of sight. The GPS tells me the distance to the animal as I stalk it. When I get to a shootable distance, I can start looking for a good spot to shoot from.  Iíve done that innumerable times with antelope, and a couple times with elk.  The last elk I did it with was 1360 yards away when I started. I blind-stalked within 115 yards before peeking over a ridge to see and shoot it; it never knew I was there.

With mapping programs I know exactly where I am, and where the boundaries are of the property Iím on. I can see landowner information for private land. I can find access to public properties that have just a tiny sliver accessible that I wouldnít be able to do otherwise.

I know which GMU Iím in, which deer area Iím in, which elk area Iím in.

I can mark my dead animal and easily find it without flagging tape when making multiple retrievals. I can leave a bread crumb track of the path I walked out, so if I need to return in the dark I can follow it.

Sunrise/sunset information is available for my location, and any location I choose. Iíve hunted some special hunts in February and March. When does the regulation pamphlet indicate that legal shooting time ends on February 15?

If I get lost or injured I can give my exact location. With RINO models the information is transmitted automatically.

I do use maps to see the ďlarge pictureĒ sometimes, but just canít understand why someone wouldnít want to also take advantage of the many functions a tool that weighs half a pound offers.

To each his own.
Last spring I spotted a bear from over a mile off. I was able to mark which basin it was in from where I was sitting in my car, I then drove around to the opposite side of the ridge where I had planned to set camp, set my camp and made about a mile and a half trek to the basin where I knew the bear to be. I did all of that with onx maps on my phone. After I shot the bear I switched over to phone and called my wife and a buddy to let them know of my success. There is almost no reason in this day for a dedicated GPS. I have yet to see a time when my phone could not be used for navigation.


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Re: To GPS or not to GPS
« Reply #57 on: June 19, 2017, 11:28:55 AM »
Assuming you have orienteering skills and keep a map and compass on you, why would someone not use a good GPS all the time? I can use an abacus, but I much prefer to do payroll using a computer.  :dunno:

Weight and loss of "experience"

I teach map skills to kids. I'll never lose the experience. I can't imagine that anyone would forget to know how to use a map and compass once they know how.  :dunno: Weight? Not a big factor for me. If it gets to be, I shouldn't have any trouble losing another 12 oz!  :)


Not what I meant by experience exactly.   Ever like to take a step back to what it was like? Along the lines of less tech is better.  As Bob said, to each is own.  I just was trying to answer your question.

I got it. I'm just really well served by a good GPS.  :dunno:
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Offline boneaddict

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Re: To GPS or not to GPS
« Reply #58 on: June 19, 2017, 12:53:16 PM »
That's  8).    That's better than getting a message I need to go look for you.
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Re: To GPS or not to GPS
« Reply #59 on: June 19, 2017, 01:43:32 PM »
That's  8).    That's better than getting a message I need to go look for you.

Well, you may indeed get the message. But, you'll have exact coordinates to find me!
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Offline Reidus

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Re: To GPS or not to GPS
« Reply #60 on: June 19, 2017, 09:45:52 PM »
Something Iíve used a GPS for on multiple occasions is creating a waypoint for an animal Iím hunting, and making a blind stalk. I range the animal, take a bearing on it, and plug the waypoint into my GPS. I can then ďgo toĒ the animalís waypoint staying completely out of sight. The GPS tells me the distance to the animal as I stalk it. When I get to a shootable distance, I can start looking for a good spot to shoot from.  Iíve done that innumerable times with antelope, and a couple times with elk.  The last elk I did it with was 1360 yards away when I started. I blind-stalked within 115 yards before peeking over a ridge to see and shoot it; it never knew I was there.

With mapping programs I know exactly where I am, and where the boundaries are of the property Iím on. I can see landowner information for private land. I can find access to public properties that have just a tiny sliver accessible that I wouldnít be able to do otherwise.

I know which GMU Iím in, which deer area Iím in, which elk area Iím in.

I can mark my dead animal and easily find it without flagging tape when making multiple retrievals. I can leave a bread crumb track of the path I walked out, so if I need to return in the dark I can follow it.

Sunrise/sunset information is available for my location, and any location I choose. Iíve hunted some special hunts in February and March. When does the regulation pamphlet indicate that legal shooting time ends on February 15?

If I get lost or injured I can give my exact location. With RINO models the information is transmitted automatically.

I do use maps to see the ďlarge pictureĒ sometimes, but just canít understand why someone wouldnít want to also take advantage of the many functions a tool that weighs half a pound offers.

To each his own.
Last spring I spotted a bear from over a mile off. I was able to mark which basin it was in from where I was sitting in my car, I then drove around to the opposite side of the ridge where I had planned to set camp, set my camp and made about a mile and a half trek to the basin where I knew the bear to be. I did all of that with onx maps on my phone. After I shot the bear I switched over to phone and called my wife and a buddy to let them know of my success. There is almost no reason in this day for a dedicated GPS. I have yet to see a time when my phone could not be used for navigation.


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when the battery is dead? When it breaks?

I think my garmin is a little tougher than my phone and when the batteries go i just slap some aa's in it. I use my phone a lot when hunting but i ain't givin up the garmin yet :twocents:

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Re: To GPS or not to GPS
« Reply #61 on: June 19, 2017, 10:28:28 PM »
Get a AA charger for your phone or a battery pack than can charge it 3-4 times.  Stand alone GPS units are dead, they just don't know it yet.  In a few years, they will be in the same drawer as your iPod and Tom Tom.

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Re: To GPS or not to GPS
« Reply #62 on: June 20, 2017, 06:15:01 AM »
Something Iíve used a GPS for on multiple occasions is creating a waypoint for an animal Iím hunting, and making a blind stalk. I range the animal, take a bearing on it, and plug the waypoint into my GPS. I can then ďgo toĒ the animalís waypoint staying completely out of sight. The GPS tells me the distance to the animal as I stalk it. When I get to a shootable distance, I can start looking for a good spot to shoot from.  Iíve done that innumerable times with antelope, and a couple times with elk.  The last elk I did it with was 1360 yards away when I started. I blind-stalked within 115 yards before peeking over a ridge to see and shoot it; it never knew I was there.

With mapping programs I know exactly where I am, and where the boundaries are of the property Iím on. I can see landowner information for private land. I can find access to public properties that have just a tiny sliver accessible that I wouldnít be able to do otherwise.

I know which GMU Iím in, which deer area Iím in, which elk area Iím in.

I can mark my dead animal and easily find it without flagging tape when making multiple retrievals. I can leave a bread crumb track of the path I walked out, so if I need to return in the dark I can follow it.

Sunrise/sunset information is available for my location, and any location I choose. Iíve hunted some special hunts in February and March. When does the regulation pamphlet indicate that legal shooting time ends on February 15?

If I get lost or injured I can give my exact location. With RINO models the information is transmitted automatically.

I do use maps to see the ďlarge pictureĒ sometimes, but just canít understand why someone wouldnít want to also take advantage of the many functions a tool that weighs half a pound offers.

To each his own.
Last spring I spotted a bear from over a mile off. I was able to mark which basin it was in from where I was sitting in my car, I then drove around to the opposite side of the ridge where I had planned to set camp, set my camp and made about a mile and a half trek to the basin where I knew the bear to be. I did all of that with onx maps on my phone. After I shot the bear I switched over to phone and called my wife and a buddy to let them know of my success. There is almost no reason in this day for a dedicated GPS. I have yet to see a time when my phone could not be used for navigation.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

when the battery is dead? When it breaks?

I think my garmin is a little tougher than my phone and when the batteries go i just slap some aa's in it. I use my phone a lot when hunting but i ain't givin up the garmin yet :twocents:

You take out your map and compass. I also keep a AAA battery pack in my pack if the lithium battery dies.
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Re: To GPS or not to GPS
« Reply #63 on: June 20, 2017, 07:09:31 AM »
Get a AA charger for your phone or a battery pack than can charge it 3-4 times.  Stand alone GPS units are dead, they just don't know it yet.  In a few years, they will be in the same drawer as your iPod and Tom Tom.
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Re: To GPS or not to GPS
« Reply #64 on: June 20, 2017, 07:14:25 AM »
GPS units are far from experiencing the fate of the dinosaur, especially multi-function units like the more advanced Rinos.
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Re: To GPS or not to GPS
« Reply #65 on: June 20, 2017, 07:38:03 AM »
Phones have some advantages over dedicated GPS units, but I still prefer a dedicated GPS in most instances for the following reasons:

1.   Durability. My GPS has been through rain, mud, dragged along the ground while I belly crawl through sage brush, tossed in my pack, jammed in a pocket, thrown in my truck, and it works. Every time.
2.   Cost. See #1. If and when my GPS fails it will cost me $250-$300 to replace. If my phone breaks, it will cost me $600 to $800 to replace.
3.   Battery life. My GPS runs 16 hours on two AAs. To change them takes about 15 seconds. The two AAs cost me about $.50 and weigh a couple ounces.
4.   Functionality. When I need to keep track of partners, I take my RINOs which provide peer-to-peer positioning without cell service. The radio provides the ability to contact emergency services in areas without cell coverage. I also donít need to carry a separate walkie-talkie.
5.   Custom maps. Iíve created and loaded a large number of custom maps for my GPS. It may be that the same technology exists with cellular devices if Iím willing to learn how to use it.
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Re: To GPS or not to GPS
« Reply #66 on: June 20, 2017, 07:47:51 AM »
That will be a nope I find GPS very unreliable to even get people to where I have lived the last 3 locations.  No way I trust electronic devices over a good map and my own sense of direction.  Especially in the forest.
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Re: To GPS or not to GPS
« Reply #67 on: June 20, 2017, 08:19:47 AM »
That will be a nope I find GPS very unreliable to even get people to where I have lived the last 3 locations.  No way I trust electronic devices over a good map and my own sense of direction.  Especially in the forest.

I think you may have missed the point. No one's saying that while using a GPS you should discard your map and compass - quite the opposite. Always have a map and compass.

I'm unsure what kind of GPS you've used, Run, but there are exceptional models available for hunting which lock up quickly in deep cover and are quite accurate to within a couple of feet.
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Re: To GPS or not to GPS
« Reply #68 on: June 20, 2017, 08:38:21 AM »
That will be a nope I find GPS very unreliable to even get people to where I have lived the last 3 locations.  No way I trust electronic devices over a good map and my own sense of direction.  Especially in the forest.

I think you may have missed the point. No one's saying that while using a GPS you should discard your map and compass - quite the opposite. Always have a map and compass.

I'm unsure what kind of GPS you've used, Run, but there are exceptional models available for hunting which lock up quickly in deep cover and are quite accurate to within a couple of feet.

I used to rely on my old etrex model (15+ yrs old) to guide me into my tree stands in the dark. The first time or two going in the dark, nothing looked familiar by flashlight. But the gps guidance was spot on.
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