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Author Topic: Shooting at deer downhill question  (Read 3117 times)

Offline Igor

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Re: Shooting at deer downhill question
« Reply #25 on: May 11, 2017, 05:20:17 PM »
I stand for the National Anthem !!

Offline yakimanoob

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Re: Shooting at deer downhill question
« Reply #26 on: May 11, 2017, 09:47:40 PM »
Here is good article: http://www.rifleshootermag.com/network-topics/tips-tactics-network/hitting-a-high-or-low-angle-shot/

Gravity is acting pirpendicular to horizontal not line of sight.

Certainly, yes, gravity always acts towards the center of the earth. When we talk about bullet "drop" when shooting at an angle, A, we're speaking in reference to the line of sight, so to figure out that drop in relation to line of sight, we have to consider how gravity is acting in relation to line of sight.

So we split the force of gravity into its component vectors, with one component equal to m*g*cos(A) acting perpendicular to the line of sight, and the other component equal to m*g*sin(A) acting along the line of sight. These two component vectors sum to equal the total force of gravity equal to  m*g acting perpendicular to horizontal as you stated.

The technique magnum_willys (and the article you posted) described only accounts for the first component that acts perpendicular to the line of sight and ignores the second vector acting along the line of sight. It also ignores the air dynamics, leading to error.

P.S., I'm simplifying by talking about line of sight. In reality these calculations are affected by the difference between line of departure (or bore line) and line of sight, especially at extreme angles or extreme distances.

P.P.S., I find it a little funny that the article dismisses velocity as having little effect on bullet flight. Tell that to everyone obsessing about muzzle velocity and talking about magnum cartridges as "flat shooting" because of all that powder.

Offline scoutdog346

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Re: Shooting at deer downhill question
« Reply #27 on: June 01, 2017, 07:17:17 PM »
What caliber?  Scope?  You may want to consider a 200 yard zero.  What distances do you think you will be shooting?

http://www.chuckhawks.com/shooting_uphill.htm

Do a search on sighting in.  Lots of info out there.

A range finder that shows true ballistic range in very helpful.

Most important practice a lot!


Tikka t3x 30-06 with a leupold vx2 4-12 50mm. I am for sure going to get myself a range finder this season. From the area I'm scouting I could easily get a 150-200 yard shot. I can't see myself getting very close to the deer like within 100 yards. I will also be looking down hill into some clear cuts so maybe 150-200 yard downhill shots. I'm using 180 grain bullets. I can't seem to find a place to sight my gun in at 200 yards. All the legal target shooting areas are 100 yards or less. I'll have to see if any local ranges have 200 yards
with that gun...if u r dead on at 100 yard shot and the buck in under 250 yards don't shoot high or low just right on. don't make things any more confusing then need be as urban normal shaking will cancel things out.  think about the longest shot u think ur going to take and figure out what u got to do then and repeat it to ur self intermittently as ur hunting or write it down on so thing u can see as ur hunting and make sure u can see it with minimal movment. but yeah man...250 or under just put the cross hares right where u want to hit.

 

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