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A Hunting Trip of a lifetime in the Wenaha Tucannon Wilderness! Extreme Elk Magazine

Author Topic: Introduction  (Read 1062 times)

Offline Ragnar

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Introduction
« on: September 06, 2017, 07:46:37 PM »
Hello Everyone -

Long time lurker, first time poster.  Just wanted to introduce myself since I finally signed up on this site.  I have been elk/deer hunting for about four years, and ever year getting closer to my first elk (got my first deer in year 3).  I don't come from a hunting family, and all my friends are computer nerds, so I hunt solo and based mostly on hours and hour of computer research.  I am an outdoorsy person, so that part is easy for me. I don't know how much I will be able to help other people as of now, but hopefully someday I can learn enough to share.  My firt question for the forum (in lieu of asking for someone's honey hole haha), is, do you guys prefer to hunt areas that have tons of elk but also tons of hunters, or less elk/less people?  Nice to "meet" everyone.

-Ragnar

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2017, 07:50:09 PM »
Welcome.  :tup:

Are you a Viking?

I don't hunt elk, but if I did, I would want quieter over quantity.
"Just because I like granola, and I have stretched my arms around a few trees, doesn't mean I'm a tree hugger!
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Offline Elkcollector82

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2017, 07:50:58 PM »
Welcome.

Less people/more elk

Offline meatwhack

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2017, 07:51:58 PM »
Welcome to the forum. I prefer to stay away from people even if it means less animals.

Offline Blacktail Sniper

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2017, 08:03:03 PM »
 :hello:

It is better to be consistently incorrect than inconsistently correct...

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My level of sarcasm depends on your level of stupidity...

Sarcasm makes smart people laugh and stupid people mad.

Offline summertime blues

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2017, 08:50:15 PM »
Less people

Offline yakimanoob

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #6 on: September 06, 2017, 09:06:15 PM »
Welcome! 

I don't mind driving past campsites (if you can even call them that - they're more like cities sometimes), but I definitely try to go steeper and deeper than others to try and get to more elk / less people. 

Offline Ragnar

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #7 on: September 06, 2017, 09:41:40 PM »
Thanks for the initial responses!

I am more specifically debating am I better off putting miles in the Goat Rocks Wilderness, or just using those same extra miles in the madness of a Winston/Lewis unit.

Offline kselkhunter

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #8 on: September 06, 2017, 10:08:12 PM »
If you're an archery or muzzleloader hunter, you won't get away from people if you go miles in the wilderness for elk.  Especially this year with so many wilderness areas on fire, those hunters are getting compacted into smaller areas.  But if rifle hunting elk, you will run into less people deeper in the wilderness.  Rifle hunters tend to stick closer to roads.  Archery and muzzy hunters venture deeper in.  Part of that is better weather, and part of that is the majority of elk are deeper in the wilderness during those times.  Whereas snow pushes many of the elk to lower elevations and out of the wilderness areas during rifle season (depending on the weather, of course).  At least in units that contain wilderness areas.  I can't comment on non-wilderness units, as I don't hunt those. 


Offline ghosthunter

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #9 on: September 06, 2017, 10:14:43 PM »
There is lots of talk about getting away from roads.

But don't overlook spots close to roads.

My group has several older hunters who just can't go a mile or more off the road any more.

Never the less they still kill animals many times 100 yards off the road. Both deer and elk.
There is so much pressure on the ridge tops that many animals have adapted to beding and resting near the roads.
We have killed a dozen bucks over the years a stone throw from a well. Traveled forest road.
Once I pulled up to park got out and found myself looking down on a 2 pt bedded against the road shoulder.

Hunt the steep and deep if you can, but don't overlook good areas with water and cover near roads. :twocents:
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Offline Fish4Fun

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #10 on: September 07, 2017, 05:57:23 AM »
Welcome to the site there are a lot of great folks here.

For elk hunting, we hunt one of the more popular units. With that comes lots of hunters, get out and find good crossings and trails where they will naturally cross. Get there in the dark before other hunters get moving, then let them bring the animals to you at sunrise.

Offline yakimanoob

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #11 on: September 07, 2017, 08:47:52 AM »
There is lots of talk about getting away from roads.

But don't overlook spots close to roads.

This is good advice.  There's a reason there are so many "truck hunters" out there.  Generally speaking I make a plan to hunt an area steep and deep, but I absolutely take my time cruising the roads in the area before and after the backcountry work.  It's easy and we've all spooked dozens of elk on the forest roads.

Offline Elkcollector82

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #12 on: September 07, 2017, 09:05:35 AM »
My biggest advice to you is to hunt where you are capable of hunting. people can say steep and deep. But if you never killed an animal in the backcountry. Then that animal could end up going to waste cause of negligence. Not trying to start anything or calling you that. I'm just stating. Going steep and deep takes more then mind set of yeah I'm gonna walk 7 miles into a wilderness. Down and animal. Then have no way of getting it out in a timely matter. Lot of preparation goes into backcoubtry hunting. Year round gear testing, scouting, making a plan on what to do when you down an animal. Heat is biggest thing early season. Bad weather is the enemy during late season.

 I do admire you wanting and starting this thread. Good info is coming from it. Just wanted to bring things to light. That you might not have thought about. Wilderness hunts in the early season Or late season is no joke. Both have situations that could be bad. But on the other hand. The scenic views are breath taking.

Offline yakimanoob

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #13 on: September 07, 2017, 10:05:07 AM »
My biggest advice to you is to hunt where you are capable of hunting. people can say steep and deep. But if you never killed an animal in the backcountry. Then that animal could end up going to waste cause of negligence. Not trying to start anything or calling you that. I'm just stating. Going steep and deep takes more then mind set of yeah I'm gonna walk 7 miles into a wilderness. Down and animal. Then have no way of getting it out in a timely matter. Lot of preparation goes into backcoubtry hunting. Year round gear testing, scouting, making a plan on what to do when you down an animal. Heat is biggest thing early season. Bad weather is the enemy during late season.

 I do admire you wanting and starting this thread. Good info is coming from it. Just wanted to bring things to light. That you might not have thought about. Wilderness hunts in the early season Or late season is no joke. Both have situations that could be bad. But on the other hand. The scenic views are breath taking.
:yeah:

Offline theleo

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #14 on: September 07, 2017, 10:10:22 AM »
Welcome!

I always prefer to hunt where there's fewer people. I'm not the worlds greatest elk hunter so I prefer to chase ones that haven't had as much education by having lots of people chasing them. That's really only an option for me because I have access to mules and enough knowledge to be comfortable packing them in ruff country. If I had to do everything on foot there's no way I'd hunt where I do because I'd never be able to get an animal out on my back without a significant portion of it going to waste.   

Offline JeffRaines

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #15 on: September 07, 2017, 11:16:00 AM »
My biggest advice to you is to hunt where you are capable of hunting. people can say steep and deep. But if you never killed an animal in the backcountry. Then that animal could end up going to waste cause of negligence. Not trying to start anything or calling you that. I'm just stating. Going steep and deep takes more then mind set of yeah I'm gonna walk 7 miles into a wilderness. Down and animal. Then have no way of getting it out in a timely matter. Lot of preparation goes into backcoubtry hunting. Year round gear testing, scouting, making a plan on what to do when you down an animal. Heat is biggest thing early season. Bad weather is the enemy during late season.

 I do admire you wanting and starting this thread. Good info is coming from it. Just wanted to bring things to light. That you might not have thought about. Wilderness hunts in the early season Or late season is no joke. Both have situations that could be bad. But on the other hand. The scenic views are breath taking.

This is a great point. The thought of trekking 8 miles into the wilderness and shooting an animal is a surreal thought - but whats going to come of the meat? I think even a boned out deer will be a liability to someone thats inexperienced, at least you could realistically make it out in one heavy trip although your legs are gonna be toast... now imagine having to make 2-3 more trips in or more to get the entire animal out... maybe in much cooler weather you could really take your time and it would be okay, but in warm weather its not gonna make it.

Offline Ragnar

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #16 on: September 07, 2017, 01:37:20 PM »
Thank you everyone for the responses! Certainly the point about being too far back in the woods is a valid one, I am thinking more in the 2-4 mile range.  I also certainly recognize that everyone "thinks" or talks about going in deep, but often people don't, or can't (no way to disprove that until I am successful, haha).  Thanks again everyone for taking the time!  I have millions of questions but will try to stagger them the best I can ;)


Offline Tinmaniac

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #17 on: September 07, 2017, 02:51:16 PM »
Solo packing an Elk 2 to 4 miles in the steep and deep?Try this first.Get an 80 lb sack of concrete.Find some hilly terrain.Drop off bag of concrete.Drive 4 miles away from bag of concrete.Load all of your gear in a pack and walk back to your sack of concrete.Do 100 squats with you pack on along the way.Jog a little.When you get to the sack of concrete spend an hour lifting and rolling it around on the ground.Find a 500 lb log and see how far you can move it.Put the sack in your pack.Walk back to your truck.Do this 3 times.This will tell you how far away you want to be from your truck.

Offline Ragnar

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #18 on: September 07, 2017, 03:03:50 PM »
Don't really want to get into a "whose tougher online" match, just a hunter hoping to be pointed in the right direction. 

Offline pianoman9701

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #19 on: September 07, 2017, 03:04:41 PM »
Welcome to the forum. Hunt where the animals are, regardless of how far from the road. Sometimes having other hunters around moves animals to you.  :dunno:
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Re: Introduction
« Reply #20 on: September 07, 2017, 03:06:56 PM »
Don't really want to get into a "whose tougher online" match, just a hunter hoping to be pointed in the right direction.

C'mon! Why not?   :chuckle:

I'll tell yah....i helped a member haul out a cow. I had only one qtr and the head. Only needed to go abput a mile and a half but it was uphill and kicked my butt! Good lesson for me. Good luck out there Rag and shoot straight.
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Offline Ragnar

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #21 on: September 07, 2017, 03:14:29 PM »
Thanks.  Aim small, miss small.

I always get a chuckle out of the warnings of how much work it is to pack out an elk, when the warning is given to someone who has tried very hard but never got one.  Its not that the warning isn't correct or anything, it just doesn't matter after a certain amount of time and effort is spent looking for these damn animals hahahaha.  It kind of seems like the warnings about how hard being a parent is, when told to someone who can't/or wants kids, the difficultly after just don't matter, somehow humans keep charging in head first.

I fully know a packout of any distance will be brutal, and will be worse than I imagine, but that doesn't mean the goal isn't worth pursuing.

Thanks everyone - this forum is awesome.

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #22 on: September 07, 2017, 03:16:36 PM »
My first bear haul out. Had a 20 foot stretch,  nearly vertical that could not be avoided.. terrible......man was it fun!
Yes, my FJ is pink, I'm all about Team Jacob, beer is not for the horses nor is whiskey for the men, they are both for me.

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #23 on: September 07, 2017, 03:21:41 PM »
High on the shoulder and close to the road!

Offline Ragnar

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #24 on: September 07, 2017, 03:28:17 PM »
 That's what I'm talking about.   Maybe even killed slightly uphill from my vehicle?

 

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