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Author Topic: TEN TIPS FOR GREAT FIELD PHOTOS - A strategy for taking quality success photos  (Read 39616 times)

Offline bow4elk

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Another option for bloody mouths and arrow/bullet wounds is simply shoot Black & White or save a B&W version out of Photoshop or any other basic photo editor.  Black & White images are often more interesting.  I recently took home a ribbon at the Pope and Young Club Biennium Convention in Texas with a B&W photo of my daughter with my turkey.  Oh, and I took the photo with my cell phone  ;) 
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Offline huntnphool

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Another option for bloody mouths and arrow/bullet wounds is simply shoot Black & White or save a B&W version out of Photoshop or any other basic photo editor.  Black & White images are often more interesting.  I recently took home a ribbon at the Pope and Young Club Biennium Convention in Texas with a B&W photo of my daughter with my turkey.  Oh, and I took the photo with my cell phone  ;)
I carry a bag of Kirkland wipes in my pack just for cleaning up the blood, works well for your hands as well. They work great, especially around the mouths when bloody.
The things that come to those who wait, may be the things left by those who got there first!

Offline beak-in-the-barrel

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Great pic!!!! Thanks for the tips, do you just set the camera on a timer or use some aftermarket remote?

Offline huntnphool

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This is the perfect time to go back and read this thread.
The things that come to those who wait, may be the things left by those who got there first!

Offline huntnphool

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Another important factor is to set your camera to shoot RAW if it has the ability.
The things that come to those who wait, may be the things left by those who got there first!

Offline DRENALINJUNKIE

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Tag

Online Bob33

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Tip 11: shoot upward from a low angle.  You want to see sky or distant backgrounds, not the ground behind the hunter. Many of my best photos of others were taken from ground level.
Nature. It's cheaper than therapy.

Offline Bean Counter

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Good suggestions. :tup: Another rule of thumb is to try to either be completely in the sun or completely in the shade, this will help in editing should your image be blown or too dark. Also try to keep from shooting into the sun. :twocents:

Tip #12

If there is still sharp daylight/shadow contrast in the faces, use fill flash. If the flash is too strong for your tastes (ie it washes out colors or skin tones) use Flash Exposure Compensation in the settings menu to dial down the flash intensity.

Offline huntnphool

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Tip 11: shoot upward from a low angle.  You want to see sky or distant backgrounds, not the ground behind the hunter. Many of my best photos of others were taken from ground level.
I try to be eye level with the animal.
The things that come to those who wait, may be the things left by those who got there first!

Offline huntnphool

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Good suggestions. :tup: Another rule of thumb is to try to either be completely in the sun or completely in the shade, this will help in editing should your image be blown or too dark. Also try to keep from shooting into the sun. :twocents:

Tip #12

If there is still sharp daylight/shadow contrast in the faces, use fill flash. If the flash is too strong for your tastes (ie it washes out colors or skin tones) use Flash Exposure Compensation in the settings menu to dial down the flash intensity.

Hats should either be turned around or taken off. Sun glasses should be removed as well.
The things that come to those who wait, may be the things left by those who got there first!

Offline huntnphool

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You want to see sky or distant backgrounds
Just make sure to set the appropriate aperture, bright sky in the background results in a lot of the pics you see with blown out backgrounds.
The things that come to those who wait, may be the things left by those who got there first!

Offline swinters

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Great write-up!  I'm going to have to use the "Banana Clip for your Shotgun" phrase!  I'm an old dude and I shot 35mm film for years and you had to really work the shot.  Everything had to be right because there was no image editing and you paid for every frame, even if you developed your own film.  I love how with digital I can experiment with dozens of different angles, settings, etc. and it doesn't cost a bundle.  I have to be careful to take care to still work the shot though.  Got to keep perspective and intent for each shot, kind of like hunting with my Browning BAR vs. my Husqvarna Bolt Action.  Great advice on the pruning shears too.  I'm surprised there hasn't been a discussion on whether to carry bypass shears or anvil shears  :).

Offline ML_Hunter

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Bob,

Maybe I missed it; but what do you do with getting the best possible photo in low light/night situations?

I think this photo came out pretty good. But it took several shots (thanks to the digital age!). Also, is there a way to Photoshop the lung bubbles? and maybe clean up some of the blood?

Thanks for the post, great pointers!

Online Rainier10

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Man this is an old one but a great thread.  I remember reading this before I joined the forum.  Great tips and tricks in this one.  You only get one time for field photos.
Pain is temporary, achieving the goal is worth it.

I didn't say it would be easy, I said it would be worth it.

Every father should remember that one day his children will follow his example instead of his advice.


The views and opinions expressed in this post are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of HuntWa or the site owner.

Offline Bean Counter

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The exposure and curves were bothering me far more than the lung blood. Ergo I only did a half assed job clone stamping. Hope you like this.

 

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