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Author Topic: staying warm in a treestand  (Read 11559 times)

Offline 724wd

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staying warm in a treestand
« on: November 22, 2010, 12:02:40 PM »
this will be my first experience hunting the late archery season.  i'll be in GMU 117, with plenty of cold temps.  i figure underarmour, pants, wool pants, leafy covering on the bottom half and for the upper, poly shirt, merino wool, fleece, wind stopper, leafy covering.  what about feet?  my boots are 400 gram thinsulate, but if you're not moving, they can get chilly.  head should be ok with facemask and watch cap.  i figure on some hand warmers and wool gloves for my fingies...

what do you guys do to stay warm?

Offline Bean Counter

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Re: staying warm in a treestand
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2010, 12:10:00 PM »
Hunt in Arizona! Its 65-70 and sunny for the January rut hunt  :IBCOOL:

Consider some sock liners for your feet. That way you'll have insulation in your boots, nice wool socks, and a thin layer against your skin. Layers = trapped pockets of air = warm & happy hunter.

Offline Kain

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Re: staying warm in a treestand
« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2010, 12:10:41 PM »

Offline croix

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Re: staying warm in a treestand
« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2010, 12:15:25 PM »
not sure how long you plan to sit, but in my experience 400 gram thins. boots won't make it 4-5 hours. i got a pair of those boot blankets from cabelas after last year. they are supposed to be good down to like -110 degrees. haven't tried them yet but i know i needed more than 400 grams last year. i also think that one of those umbrellas that attach to the tree might be a good idea when the wet snow is dumping. my wool got soaked through last year and things got miserable after that. those handwarmers are handy too.

have extra clothes on hand so that after the first day if you were too cold then you can add layers. last year in that same gmu i had my limit of layers on while still being able to move and after 5 hours i was DONE. i almost bought a heater body suit after that, but just bought heavier polar weight base layers instead. i'm not sure that i've stumbled on any magic combos yet, but i'm getting closer.

bottom line - 5 hours in 10 degrees with heavy snow falling gets VERY FRIGGIN COLD.
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Offline Skyvalhunter

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Re: staying warm in a treestand
« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2010, 12:16:03 PM »
Best thing is to keep dry. I.E. if you hike to you tree stand location and are sweaty change into warm dry clothes. I found that the Cold Weather Under Armor to be too warm if hiking but they would be just right if sitting in a tree stand or glassing from a knob. Definitely layer your clothes.

Offline top pin1

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Re: staying warm in a treestand
« Reply #5 on: November 22, 2010, 12:24:13 PM »
The Wambag or Heater body suit are your ticket but their $250 price range.

I bought a warmbag and will never go back.     http://www.thewarmbag.com/The_Warmbag_p/twb.htm

Trouble with wearing enough clothes to stay warm in 10 degree or less weather is how bulky it is and how sweaty you get hiking in any distance to your stand. My favorite stand is 600 yards uphill. Your soaked in sweat if you wear enough clothes to stay warm. Warmbag was the ticket. The last year before I bought the warm bag I was hiking in with a pack on. Just wearing long underwear, shorts and a thin top at -3 degrees when I got out of the truck. Changed into the warm stuff at the base of the tree but carrying that much crap to the tree got annoying and didnt allow you to take anything else.

That kidney wrap seriously works also. I've had that and used it for 5 years now. Amazing how warm blood keeps your warm.

They make toe heaters. Just like the hand warmers but their thin and have sticky on them to stick to your socks. THEY WORK. Costco sells them by the box. They last a good solid 6+ hours and will keep your whole foot warm.

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Offline Sumpnneedskillin

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Re: staying warm in a treestand
« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2010, 12:37:44 PM »
I have 1200 gram boots that are nice.  I like the heated insoles better that the toe heaters.  The stick on heat pads for your back are nice right about kidney level.  I usually put those in my boots and on my back at the base of my tree.  I also have a small travel thermos.  Holds about 12 oz.  I'd make a super hot batch of spiced cider and have cup of that with a granola bar for a snack mid morning when you starting to get cold and think about heading back to the nice warm truck.  The other I did was I had a single burner stove and a coffee pot in the truck.  When I got back I'd make a cup of something hot to help warm back up.

Biggest problem I found was finding a glove that kept my hand warm but allowed me to wear and use my release.  I'd put a hot hands in my gloves and in my pockets and keep my hand in my pocket until something came along.
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Offline DoubleJ

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Re: staying warm in a treestand
« Reply #7 on: November 22, 2010, 12:38:53 PM »
Being a bit overweight has worked for me  :dunno:
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Offline 724wd

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Re: staying warm in a treestand
« Reply #8 on: November 22, 2010, 01:18:57 PM »
Being a bit overweight has worked for me  :dunno:

i suppose i have some of that covered!   :chuckle:  only worth 225 lbs though... 

luckily my stand is within 200 yards of the house and driveway (i hunt 160 acres of private land) and it's nice and level, so no hiking concerns.  i have a ladder stand up over a little clearing and travel route. 

thanks for all your ideas!  i'll look into your suggestions, but i think my wife would kill me over a warm bag or heater body suit!   :o  the kidney heater sounds like a great idea!

Offline adam.WI

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Re: staying warm in a treestand
« Reply #9 on: November 22, 2010, 01:23:48 PM »
Buy some pack boots and you should be good. I grew up in the cold and it takes less than you think if you have decent gear. I would recommend 1200 gram boots and keep your head and neck warm. If your good there everything else will follow

Offline Machias

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Re: staying warm in a treestand
« Reply #10 on: November 22, 2010, 01:27:38 PM »
I have LIVED in treestands before in pretty frigid weather. Hour before sunup to a half hour after sundown in single digit weather with some stiff winds.  Your toes will be rock solid...or at least feel that way with 400 gr.  If you can find a good pair of the Air Force Mickey Mouse boots, they are terrible for hiking, but one of the best treestand boots around.  Otherwise I would get the boot blankets.  Best glove is a waterproof glo-mitt.  You can put the hand warmer in the mitt part and easily slip your fingers out to shoot.  I have bowhunted with these alot and they are the warmest gloves around for that purpose.  Make sure you cover your head and neck and you'll be good to go.  Don't forget the safety harness....please!!
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Offline Dadbear

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Re: staying warm in a treestand
« Reply #11 on: November 22, 2010, 01:32:40 PM »
Include a head/neck gaiter in your gear. Keeping the cold  off  your neck and water from running down your shirt is one of the keys for me. 

Offline Button Nubbs

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Re: staying warm in a treestand
« Reply #12 on: November 22, 2010, 01:52:08 PM »
Take the little disposable heater packets and put them under your gloves on the bottom side of your wrist. it works magic when I'm steelhead fishing with cold wet hands when its in the teens outside. I'm sure you could do it on your ankles also.
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Offline danrabe

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Re: staying warm in a treestand
« Reply #13 on: November 22, 2010, 02:40:16 PM »
It may sound fairly silly, but it works great for me, especially in the cold, wet areas like WA.  Get a pair of stockingfoot 5mm Neoprene Chest waders.  Put full long underwear underneath as well as polar fleece pants and good wool socks, a pair of Sorrell boots will work as a "wading" boot.  It gives you a nice, thick, flexible, waterproof, quiet layer.  It'll keep your feet warm all day long, even if you are standing in 35 degree water for 6 hours.

Just carry them and a pair of boots that will fit loosely over them in a small pack and once you get to your stand, put them on, and climb on up.  Always works great for me!

Offline Austrian Hunter

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Re: staying warm in a treestand
« Reply #14 on: November 22, 2010, 02:55:24 PM »
Good thread,
For me it seems I can never put on enough layers, I start with Underamor Heat Gear, than over that goes my Underamor cold gear, some fleece pants and than my regular camo pants, two fleece shirts and fleece pullover and than my regular camo jacket.  I use feet warmers and hand warmers the disposable kind, I also have the boot cover but have not used them, I will this year but they are huge and a pain in the butt to carry in.  I have to hike 20-30 minuted to my stand and I sit 20 min before sun light until dark.  For me the biggest challenge is the hike in and not start to sweat, but I don;t like to carry all that stuff with me either, allways a challenge and hopefully it will pay off.  Gool luck, and don;t freeze to death.  I'm in unit 117 starting on the 29th and it will be cold :IBCOOL:

 

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