Hunting Washington Forum

Other Activities => Fishing => Topic started by: Wanderer on May 14, 2017, 08:12:27 PM

Title: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Wanderer on May 14, 2017, 08:12:27 PM
First year for fishing halibut in Puget Sound.  I've noticed that a lot of people anchor up to fish.   From what I've heard about anchoring you should be have about 8 times the water depth in rope.  So 100 depth = 800 ft. of rope, 200/1600, etc...Am I correct in thinking that way ?  Are people carrying 1600 feet of rope around for halibut fishing ? 
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: h2ofowlr on May 14, 2017, 08:22:05 PM
Most are carrying 300' - 400' foot of rope.  That should be all you need.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Brushcrawler on May 14, 2017, 08:25:21 PM
300 works fine for me. The sliding bouy rig makes it a lot easier when you are ready to leave.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Mfowl on May 14, 2017, 08:47:32 PM
We use 600' and never anchor more than 125' deep. The thing you need to keep in perspective is the scope on your line. First, its a safety matter. Too vertical and you run the risk of taking water over your bow in rough conditions or when a big wake hits you. Especially if your anchor is lodged in the bottom. If your anchor is hung up and line is vertical you can literally pull your bow under when you ride up a swell or big wake. Second, again if too vertical your anchor may not hold the bottom and you will end up dragging it off your spot. This will especially happen in big tide swings when the water gets rippin through the strait. Regardless of how much line you use you should be set back 80-100' from your buoy, this will help protect you by letting your buoy take the pressure of the heavy currents while providing room for your boat to ride over big seas. We've had excellent success on anchor and also drawn plenty of blank days. Its a fun way to fish versus the grind of bouncing heavy gear all day. When the fish do come in they can be like a swarm of sharks and limits may come quick. Have fun, and be safe out there!
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Stein on May 15, 2017, 12:10:36 PM
I guess I am in the minority, I have 200' of rope (274' overall) and anchor up to 125' deep.  I only anchor 1-2 days a year max, so I just couldn't justify buying 400' of rope or storing it for 364 days a year.

1.  I only anchor on decent days and inside waters with current about 2.5 knots or under (aka good fishing conditions).
2.  I have about 24' of chain for my 18' boat.  In my experience, chain greatly magnifies the holding power.
3.  I use a standard ball retrieval system so the pull on my bow is horizontal.
4.  I run a separate 50' chunk of semi-weak rope (100# test) between the ball and my boat.  Looking back, it could be 75-100'.
5.  I run the rope to a rope that runs from the bow eyelet to the rear cleat so I can unhook or cut the line from the back very quickly.  Many videos on Youtube show this method.  The added benefit is I can retrieve from the rear and deploy from the rear and avoid having to climb up front.

I never have problem dragging, coming undone or pulling and have never felt unsafe.

I bought my setup from anchoring.com which is in Bellingham I think. They have great info and prices.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Alchase on May 16, 2017, 01:49:08 PM
We use 600' and never anchor more than 125' deep. The thing you need to keep in perspective is the scope on your line. First, its a safety matter. Too vertical and you run the risk of taking water over your bow in rough conditions or when a big wake hits you. Especially if your anchor is lodged in the bottom. If your anchor is hung up and line is vertical you can literally pull your bow under when you ride up a swell or big wake. Second, again if too vertical your anchor may not hold the bottom and you will end up dragging it off your spot. This will especially happen in big tide swings when the water gets rippin through the strait. Regardless of how much line you use you should be set back 80-100' from your buoy, this will help protect you by letting your buoy take the pressure of the heavy currents while providing room for your boat to ride over big seas. We've had excellent success on anchor and also drawn plenty of blank days. Its a fun way to fish versus the grind of bouncing heavy gear all day. When the fish do come in they can be like a swarm of sharks and limits may come quick. Have fun, and be safe out there!

Good info in this thread!
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: bighorn1 on May 16, 2017, 02:31:07 PM
I anchor fish in Westport and anchor around 200 feet my boat is 27 feet and I only use a 25 pound break away anchor I have ,500 feet of line but depending on current I usually use about 300 feet of line and put out a large windsock to keep me from swinging to much.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Wanderer on May 16, 2017, 05:44:57 PM
great info guy !   as someone who hasn't done deep water anchoring(>30ft) this really helps.  found a great website for rope(erigging.com) so I have 600 feet coming.    will also get the buoy setup for retrieval.  Has anyone used their pot puller to pull up the anchor ?   or do you think it would be too much to break it loose from the bottom ?
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Mfowl on May 16, 2017, 10:51:28 PM
great info guy !   as someone who hasn't done deep water anchoring(>30ft) this really helps.  found a great website for rope(erigging.com) so I have 600 feet coming.    will also get the buoy setup for retrieval.  Has anyone used their pot puller to pull up the anchor ?   or do you think it would be too much to break it loose from the bottom ?

Congrats on the setup! I would not recommend using your pot puller to pull the anchor. Just a matter of safety IMO. I've anchored alot in the Columbia and a decent amount for halibut in the Strait. The most dangerous part is pulling your anchor. Should the rope get hung up on your prop and the boat spins around and your transom is facing the current it becomes a critical situation immediately! A boat sunk on the Columbia earlier this year for this very same reason. Use your buoy to pull your anchor. The Orvals sliding anchor retriever is the best IMO but the EZ Marine works great to, just that you have to thread your line through it each time you use it instead of clamping it on. Given the intense currents that you can and likely will face in the Strait always err on the side of caution. Theres some good how to videos on Youtube that outline the basic principals of both setting and retrieving your anchor. Look up EZ Marine for starters.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: JimmyHoffa on May 18, 2017, 09:53:52 AM
https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/erule.jsp?id=1972 (https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/erule.jsp?id=1972)
Tack on another day to test out anchoring.  Opening up on the 25th now too.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: bighorn1 on May 18, 2017, 11:00:13 AM
Make sure to use a break away anchor in case you hang up. The davit is not a good idea we have lost boats and people here at Westport doing just that. It works just like a lever in fast current and if the boat gets sideways it can flip you right over.. use the ball and anchor system it's easy and a lot safer.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Stein on May 18, 2017, 11:30:55 AM
great info guy !   as someone who hasn't done deep water anchoring(>30ft) this really helps.  found a great website for rope(erigging.com) so I have 600 feet coming.    will also get the buoy setup for retrieval.  Has anyone used their pot puller to pull up the anchor ?   or do you think it would be too much to break it loose from the bottom ?

Depends on what you anchor in and what angle you are pulling on, I would guess it would only work if the conditions were perfect.  Personally, I wouldn't use my pot puller as the buoy works perfect.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: HvyHorn338 on May 18, 2017, 12:36:57 PM
No way whatsoever on pulling anchor with davit puller setup.  Once you set the pick and you realize how fast the current flows in the straights you'll understand.  Buoy system works fantastic and the safest option.  Just remember to keep tabs of your surroundings when on the pick,  watch for logs, debris etc and like others have mentioned have a knife handy at all times just in case.  Good luck. 
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Fishstiq on May 18, 2017, 02:14:47 PM
I have always heard/read/used the rule of scope 3X depth (so 300 feet of rope for 100 foot depth) and 1 foot of chain per foot of boat.  The chain does all the work, the anchor takes all the credit!


Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: elkdrivemenuts on May 19, 2017, 09:29:05 AM
Make sure you feed the anchor line thru the buoy slider the correct way. Gets ugly quick if you feed ity wrong.

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: OltHunter on April 12, 2021, 07:27:42 AM
Felt this was enough good info here to revive this thread instead of starting a new one! Apologies if this is frowned upon...

I'm working on setting up my anchor system, with the anchor ring and buoy, similar to @Stein and sounds like a few others here use a similar method.  I was wondering what you all do in areas with a lot of pressure and anchored up boats?

Let's say you got you anchor down and there are 10 other boats all around you.  Do you have to hand retrieve or are you just picking a clear lane and running the boat that way?

I haven't anchored up for halibut before, and that was my main concern.  Or maybe you are able to spread out a bit for halibut and it's not an issue.  I just know shrimp fishing with your pots you think you have a good spot and setup and you're going to have a good day and then someone comes and basically drops their pot on top of your pot and tangles up your line on the retrieval!

Thanks!
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: fishngamereaper on April 12, 2021, 07:39:33 AM
Since your just motoring over you own scope you shouldn't have to pick a line. Its not like your dragging your line across the surface, your just surfacing your line where its at if that makes sense.  If someone over anchors you tell em to move.

If you need you can slow motor and have someone hand pull and not use the ball. Once you get past your anchor hold it will come free.

With that said there is plenty of room and hopefully people give you room. When, (rarely) I do anchor I've never had anyone closer than 500-600 yds. If someone dropped right near me I would personally move.  :twocents:
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: KFhunter on April 12, 2021, 07:44:55 AM
They get close on the Columbia during sturgeon season, but I've never had a problem running up a lane to pull anchor with the bouy.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Mfowl on April 12, 2021, 09:07:27 AM
Halibut anchoring is not like the Columbia. You want space and other guys on anchor don't want anyone nearby. Many fish through tide changes and their will do a 180 drift over their anchor. I would recommend giving plenty of space and just not worrying about others lines. Also, the halibut are drawn in to sent and sound of your anchor set. You are not on travel lanes like salmon fishing. If they are there, they will come to you.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Stein on April 12, 2021, 09:56:16 AM
Since my last post I upgraded to 400', got a good deal on eBay and now don't have to worry about it.

I agree, anchoring in 60' on the Columbia is night and day from 125-300' on the salt.  Give your fellow anglers MUCH more room.  You can still anticipate where you will drift and that, but room is your friend.

Wind will blow and tides will change.  A tall boat with 400' out will swing much differently than a sled with 150' out, you can't really predict what will happen when tides and wind changes.  On the Columbia, it's way more predictable and easy to slide into a narrow slot.

As mentioned, there are no slots, you are fishing a huge area, use that to your advantage.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: OltHunter on April 12, 2021, 10:37:22 AM
Thanks all for the input.  I haven't really hit halibut much, so didn't know how crazy it got with boats and anchors.  I'd never plop down close to anyone, but curious if that was an issue you all have/had to deal with.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: KFhunter on April 12, 2021, 12:40:35 PM
What achor do you use to keep it down after a tide change and 180 swing around?

Our fluke style anchors on the Columbia is meant for a one way pull, and we use zip ties on them for break aways, to dump the flukes.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Stein on April 12, 2021, 12:52:55 PM
The challenge with fishing is that you may be in much different bottom types, from mud to rock.  I used to have a fluke with breakaway, but it doesn't hold well in rock and can get choked up in eel grass or kelpy areas. 

I switched to a Lewmar style and it seems to work well under most bottom conditions I have anchored in.  During tide shifts, it seems to shift and regrab the bottom and I haven't had it kick loose after I was solid.

It also has a breakaway feature, I would be hesitant to use one that didn't as they can be difficult to pry loose with a smaller boat that lacks the weight of a big cabin boat or sailboat.  The breakaway seems to have been tripped maybe 1/3 of the time.  I tend to go pretty light on the breakaway, usually a couple of zip ties instead of metal as my boat is fairly light and nuisance tripping hasn't been an issue.  If the hook is stuck, I want the breakaway to easily pop so I don't have to really yank on it or have the perfect angle.  My lewmar style has chain that is zip tied to the front so it can be popped loose from a wide variety of angles.  The breakaway on the fluke had to be pulled fairly straight back, if you don't get the angle right it wouldn't let go and I like to pull a bit from the side so the rope isn't directly under the boat and near the prop.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: KFhunter on April 12, 2021, 01:01:44 PM
Oops I lied, we're using this type,
maybe I should make a few in case we loose one.

The zip tie keeps the chain at the top of the anchor, when pulling if it hangs the ziptie breaks and the chain pulls from the bottom, shich slides the "flukes" straight up and out.

Haven't lost one yet in the Columbia, but others have and salt that much easier with a wider drift potential.


Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Stein on April 12, 2021, 01:58:52 PM
I know those are popular on the Columbia, but not so much on the salt.  I haven't used one, but have seen a few boats with them.  Just a guess, but it looks like it might be a bit snaggy in rocky areas and not much surface for holding in sand.  I'm a novice, so I wouldn't put any faith in my guess there.

This is what I use (many different manufacturers):

https://www.amazon.com/MarineNow-Galvanized-Bruce-Style-Anchor/dp/B00X4SNK6Q/ref=asc_df_B00X4SNK6Q/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=416802958964&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=14516787702492273918&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9033354&hvtargid=pla-883554305508&psc=1&tag=&ref=&adgrpid=95577037802&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvadid=416802958964&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=14516787702492273918&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9033354&hvtargid=pla-883554305508 (https://www.amazon.com/MarineNow-Galvanized-Bruce-Style-Anchor/dp/B00X4SNK6Q/ref=asc_df_B00X4SNK6Q/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=416802958964&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=14516787702492273918&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9033354&hvtargid=pla-883554305508&psc=1&tag=&ref=&adgrpid=95577037802&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvadid=416802958964&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=14516787702492273918&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9033354&hvtargid=pla-883554305508)
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: KFhunter on April 12, 2021, 02:02:50 PM
Ya, and really pull up the weeds!


Good on gravel, pebble bottoms, with loose rocks in sandy or clay bottoms.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Stein on April 12, 2021, 02:10:41 PM
The area I usually fish is rock bottom and the fluke would either set right away or drag and bounce, set for a second, kick loose, drag, etc.

I would also use it to anchor the boat near a beach in the summer and it wouldn't set well in the eel grass.

Galvanized anchors are cheap, I should have upgraded years ago.  The new one, knock on wood, does the trick.  I don't think hali anchoring is very demanding, I'm only out there a couple hours usually around slack and not during ripper tides, huge weather, large boat, or the stuff that people anchoring overnight might see.  I have seen people hali fishing with Columbia anchors, someone around here might be able to chime in.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Brushcrawler on April 12, 2021, 02:15:58 PM
I use a Columbia anchor for halibut. Only drop the hook on smallish tides and never in more than 150. Remember to keep an eye out for people drifting down on you, I e had to blow the horn on a couple guys not paying attention. Sometimes they donate their spreader rigs to your anchor line.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: OltHunter on April 12, 2021, 02:38:24 PM
I know those are popular on the Columbia, but not so much on the salt.  I haven't used one, but have seen a few boats with them.  Just a guess, but it looks like it might be a bit snaggy in rocky areas and not much surface for holding in sand.  I'm a novice, so I wouldn't put any faith in my guess there.
This is what I use (many different manufacturers):

That's a really good price, thanks for sharing.  I was looking at the Rocna 13lb fisherman anchor for $230!  Could do 22lb for $80
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: GWP on April 12, 2021, 04:30:59 PM
I have only been fishing salt for a couple years total. Been an interesting journey. Had 100’ plus out in 30’ of water and had a big wave sneak up on me and break OVER the outboard. That was an eye opener for sure. The ocean does not really care about your ‘feelings’!!! 😳🤯😄
The whitecaps on Lake Washington are ‘cute’ compared to the ones I have encountered in the sound or on the coast. Tide changes are a whole different animal to get used to.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: KFhunter on April 12, 2021, 05:22:26 PM
I have only been fishing salt for a couple years total. Been an interesting journey. Had 100’ plus out in 30’ of water and had a big wave sneak up on me and break OVER the outboard. That was an eye opener for sure. The ocean does not really care about your ‘feelings’!!! 😳🤯😄
The whitecaps on Lake Washington are ‘cute’ compared to the ones I have encountered in the sound or on the coast. Tide changes are a whole different animal to get used to.

When whitecaps are coming towards the stern I toss the anchor line around a rear cleat, faces the boat into the waves 1/4 away.  Boat planes to one side in the current though, but you can pick a side to plane too.

Easy to yank the line off the cleat too, the boat swings around facing the current.

I dunno if that'd be safe or not in the salt, depends on the current and if the stern is burying in down into the current.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Stein on April 12, 2021, 05:31:18 PM
When whitecaps are coming over the stern, I turn the boat to the dock and push the throttle lever forward.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: KFhunter on April 12, 2021, 05:42:00 PM
Lol then I'd never fish!

Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Mfowl on April 12, 2021, 07:07:09 PM
Oops I lied, we're using this type,
maybe I should make a few in case we loose one.

The zip tie keeps the chain at the top of the anchor, when pulling if it hangs the ziptie breaks and the chain pulls from the bottom, shich slides the "flukes" straight up and out.

Haven't lost one yet in the Columbia, but others have and salt that much easier with a wider drift potential.

I use this same anchor for columbia and hali fishing. Depending on how big your boat is, adding chain does wonders for holding bottom. 10-15' is pretty common.

I use a Columbia anchor for halibut. Only drop the hook on smallish tides and never in more than 150. Remember to keep an eye out for people drifting down on you, I e had to blow the horn on a couple guys not paying attention. Sometimes they donate their spreader rigs to your anchor line.

 :yeah: Kelp patties too! PITA to clear your buoy!
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: HvyHorn338 on April 13, 2021, 01:54:30 PM
I've been using the 13lb Rocna with chain the length of my boat for 5 years now in the straits, ocean etc with great results.  No issues ever with setting, tide changes or retrieval.  Grabs on all bottom surfaces that I have experienced so far.   
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: fishngamereaper on April 13, 2021, 02:38:41 PM
Any proper anchor system requires chain to achieve good hold. Preferably the length of your boat at minimum.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Stein on May 04, 2021, 05:15:19 PM
Anyone run Spectra cord?  Sounds pretty appealing to have a small spool of 5 mm as opposed to a huge bucket of thick rope.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: KFhunter on May 04, 2021, 05:45:17 PM
Anyone run Spectra cord?  Sounds pretty appealing to have a small spool of 5 mm as opposed to a huge bucket of thick rope.
Would you need to add stretchy stuff?

Less drag in the current too
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Stein on May 04, 2021, 06:08:20 PM
I'm not sure if they run some nylon at the top or just spectra all the way in. I would think the ball retrieval thing would have a hard time grabbing onto something that thin?
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Angry Perch on May 05, 2021, 09:24:55 AM
I'm not sure if they run some nylon at the top or just spectra all the way in. I would think the ball retrieval thing would have a hard time grabbing onto something that thin?

You could go to the setup with a ring instead of the rope grabber doo-hicky.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: 7mmfan on May 05, 2021, 09:32:29 AM
I'm not sure if they run some nylon at the top or just spectra all the way in. I would think the ball retrieval thing would have a hard time grabbing onto something that thin?

You could go to the setup with a ring instead of the rope grabber doo-hicky.

 :yeah:  however, what makes the ring work is the resistance of the rope in the water as you pull away from it. The buoy is the lifting mechanism. If your rope, or in this case spectra fiber, slices through the water with little resistance it will take much longer for your anchor to pull. To safely pull your anchor this way you need to be in a slight turn the whole time to keep the anchor line off the side of your boat and your prop, the spectra would likely just pivot on the buoy because of low water resistance.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Angry Perch on May 05, 2021, 09:37:04 AM
I'm not sure if they run some nylon at the top or just spectra all the way in. I would think the ball retrieval thing would have a hard time grabbing onto something that thin?

You could go to the setup with a ring instead of the rope grabber doo-hicky.

 :yeah:  however, what makes the ring work is the resistance of the rope in the water as you pull away from it. The buoy is the lifting mechanism. If your rope, or in this case spectra fiber, slices through the water with little resistance it will take much longer for your anchor to pull. To safely pull your anchor this way you need to be in a slight turn the whole time to keep the anchor line off the side of your boat and your prop, the spectra would likely just pivot on the buoy because of low water resistance.

That makes sense. And this is all reminding me that I need to do some anchoring/ retrieving practice in Sequim Bay this spring. It's all new to me.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Stein on May 05, 2021, 12:36:44 PM
I don't really like the ring because it's much harder to use if you don't put out all the rope.  With the clinch type, you can let out however much you want, cinch it up and then the ball will stay put and you can let a bit more out and tie off to your bow.  When you are ready to go, just fire up the motor and start pulling it.

With the ring, you would have to fasten the ring to the rope and then undo it before you could pull.  It also won't hold the rope so once the anchor comes up and you let off the throttle the anchor will fall back to the bottom.

In my mind, the ball doesn't really help pull the anchor, it mostly helps on retrieval as you can run the rope through all the way to the chain and it will hold it there while you pull in just the rope without having to heave the weight of the anchor the whole time.

If you drive over the top of the anchor and pull it the opposite direction it will either come up or the zip ties will break and then you pull the anchor out of the snag backwards.

I think spectra would work better, it's the force of the water against the ball that does all the work both in pulling the anchor off the bottom and  then up to the surface.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Angry Perch on May 05, 2021, 01:04:49 PM
I don't really like the ring because it's much harder to use if you don't put out all the rope.  With the clinch type, you can let out however much you want, cinch it up and then the ball will stay put and you can let a bit more out and tie off to your bow.  When you are ready to go, just fire up the motor and start pulling it.

With the ring, you would have to fasten the ring to the rope and then undo it before you could pull.  It also won't hold the rope so once the anchor comes up and you let off the throttle the anchor will fall back to the bottom.

Once the chain pulls through up to the anchor, there should be more weight in chain than anchor, and it should hold.

In my mind, the ball doesn't really help pull the anchor, it mostly helps on retrieval as you can run the rope through all the way to the chain and it will hold it there while you pull in just the rope without having to heave the weight of the anchor the whole time.

If you drive over the top of the anchor and pull it the opposite direction it will either come up or the zip ties will break and then you pull the anchor out of the snag backwards.

I think spectra would work better, it's the force of the water against the ball that does all the work both in pulling the anchor off the bottom and  then up to the surface.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: 7mmfan on May 05, 2021, 08:57:45 PM
The ring definitely holds the anchor, I've done it about 900 times. Once your chain makes it through the ring, your anchor will hang in it and you just pull it in, just like with the lift and lock system.

You are right that if you want a lead from your buoy to your boat, you need to tie it off,  and then pull back to it if you want to untie and pull your hook. It's not difficult, but is another step and easier with 2 guys. Depending on the size of your boat, this isn't really necessary. I've anchored in hundreds of feet of water hundreds of times, in really big water, with no lead, but I was in a 32' boat.

I'll also add, if you intend on anchoring in rock frequently,  buy the cheapest Danforth you can get and invest in more chain. Your anchor will hang, and the cheaper anchor will bend out easier. The chain is what hooks you anyway.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: GWP on May 05, 2021, 09:06:26 PM
Just got a call that my new MinnKota Riptide Terrova is in. THAT will be my new salt water anchor!
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: 7mmfan on May 05, 2021, 09:07:21 PM
Just got a call that my new MinnKota Riptide Terrova is in. THAT will be my new salt water anchor!

Now you're talking!
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: WSU on May 06, 2021, 09:55:42 AM
We anchored on the halibut opener for Area 6.  We fished one tide two days in a row (roughly 5 hours each day).  The first day we got 3, which was the best we heard from any boat.  We did the same thing the next day in the same location on the same tide and got 0.  Seems like a fair amount of luck involved, both good and bad. 

It sure seems to me like drifting would be better to cover ground, but that doesn't seem to be the consensus.  Seems like nobody is sure if one is better than the other.  What do others thing?

Also, we used some crab rope I have for pulling elk out and it worked great with the EZ Mariner puller.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: fishngamereaper on May 06, 2021, 10:20:22 AM
We've anchored before and had some luck but my ADD kick's in. I like to drift and cover ground. Halibut are opportunistic feeder's. Being anchored you hope they catch your scent and come looking. Drifting you hope they catch your sent and if not you hope you drift over their ambush hole. We have holes that are guaranteed spots on the inside but they are to deep to anchor.. With that said i prefer to run offshore and just get it done...if I don't get a bite in 5 minutes something is wrong... :chuckle:
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: WSU on May 06, 2021, 10:48:34 AM
The straits were a different deal for sure.  Seems like a tiny fraction of the amount of fish offshore.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Mfowl on May 06, 2021, 01:28:19 PM
It sure seems to me like drifting would be better to cover ground, but that doesn't seem to be the consensus.  Seems like nobody is sure if one is better than the other.  What do others thing?
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Inside the Strait I much prefer anchoring as bites are likely few and far between. Its much more relaxing to sit on the hook.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Angry Perch on May 06, 2021, 02:34:59 PM
For you guys that anchor, do you throw a chum bag out on a downrigger?
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Mfowl on May 06, 2021, 02:41:53 PM
For you guys that anchor, do you throw a chum bag out on a downrigger?

I do put a chum bag on the DR not the anchor. My opinion being that the anchor will lure fish past your gear while the DR will bring them to it.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: WSU on May 06, 2021, 03:42:54 PM
For you guys that anchor, do you throw a chum bag out on a downrigger?

We put one on the DR.  One day we caught fish and one we didn't.  Hard to say if it matters or not.  With 4 lines in the water, most with 2 baits, we already had a lot of scent down there.
Title: Re: Anchoring for Halibut
Post by: Mfowl on May 06, 2021, 06:13:28 PM
For you guys that anchor, do you throw a chum bag out on a downrigger?

I do put a chum bag on the DR not the anchor. My opinion being that the anchor will lure fish past your gear while the DR will bring them to it.

I should add that I believe the sound of weights thumping on the bottom is the main attractor and the chum/scent is just insurance.
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