Hunting Washington Forum

Big Game Hunting => Out Of State Hunting => Topic started by: CarbonHunter on January 24, 2021, 04:19:20 PM

Title: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: CarbonHunter on January 24, 2021, 04:19:20 PM
Has anyone on here gone to the effort changing their residence to either Montana or Idaho for better hunting opportunities while continuing to work in Washington?

Ive been considering this move knowing I will retire outside of Washington and it would allow me to know where I will hunt each year without waiting for a draw or other hurdles that prevent you from hunting the same location each year. The biggest obstacle is that you would need to pay a state income tax to a state for income made in Washington.

I would really like to find a hunting spot that I could count on returning to each year without playing a lottery each year for a chance at a good hunt. Anyone with experience?
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: Ridgeratt on January 24, 2021, 04:30:23 PM
Just get a po box.  You will be golden.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: Naches Sportsman on January 24, 2021, 04:34:06 PM
Just get a po box.  You will be golden.

That's not how it works.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: bornhunter on January 24, 2021, 04:34:27 PM
Just get a po box.  You will be golden.

No. A buddy of mine did that and he is still paying fines and back taxes.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: Bob33 on January 24, 2021, 04:36:41 PM
Each state has different requirements. These are Montana's.

     (2) A person who has physically resided in Montana as the person's principal or primary home or place of abode for 180 consecutive days and who meets the criteria of subsection (4) immediately before making application for any license is eligible to receive resident hunting, fishing, and trapping licenses. As used in this section, a vacant lot or a premises used solely for business purposes is not considered a principal or primary home or place of abode.
     (3) A person who obtains residency under subsection (2) may continue to be a resident for purposes of this section by physically residing in Montana as the person's principal or primary home or place of abode for not less than 120 days a year and by meeting the criteria of subsection (4) prior to making application for any resident hunting, fishing, or trapping license.
     (4) In addition to the requirements of subsection (2) or (3), a person shall meet the following criteria to be considered a resident for purposes of this section:
     (a) the person's principal or primary home or place of abode is in Montana;
     (b) the person files Montana state income tax returns as a resident if required to file;
     (c) the person licenses and titles in Montana as required by law any vehicles that the person owns and operates in Montana;
     (d) except as provided in subsection (1)(b), the person does not possess or apply for any resident hunting, fishing, or trapping licenses from another state or country or exercise resident hunting, fishing, or trapping privileges in another state or country; and
     (e) if the person registers to vote, the person registers only in Montana.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: CarbonHunter on January 24, 2021, 05:00:05 PM
Ive read the rules and know it more than a PO Box or a vehicle licensed in the state. The big question is the taxes worth it for a stable hunting plan. If you buy a house or property in another state you are already paying the property taxes but if you want the hunting rights you then have to pay the income tax and you would need to vote from that property meaning you wouldnt have a vote for the local elections. Keep in mind you would still be paying all of Washingtons taxes as well.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: rtspring on January 24, 2021, 05:20:33 PM
Serve your country!  I hunt 3 states at the cost of a resident!  Oh and oregon fishing and hunting license is free for life plus 14.00 elk tag
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: Cougartail on January 24, 2021, 05:43:13 PM
You are a resident in the location of your primary home. How much time you live there and type of structure/ownership matters. Unless you live on the boundry and come into Washington to work I wouldn't do it. :twocents:
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: cem3434 on January 24, 2021, 05:57:00 PM
Just get a po box.  You will be golden.

Isn't that what one of the well known archery guys did on this site and ended up getting busted?
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: Buckmark on January 24, 2021, 06:01:41 PM
Longtatlaw
 :peep:
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: CarbonHunter on January 24, 2021, 06:34:08 PM
Serve your country!  I hunt 3 states at the cost of a resident!  Oh and oregon fishing and hunting license is free for life plus 14.00 elk tag

Too late and too old to go down that road.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: Sneaky on January 24, 2021, 06:54:07 PM
https://app.leg.wa.gov/rcw/default.aspx?cite=77.15.650#:~:text=(2)%20A%20person%20is%20guilty,used%20for%20any%20commercial%20purpose.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: CarbonHunter on January 24, 2021, 06:58:48 PM
https://app.leg.wa.gov/rcw/default.aspx?cite=77.15.650#:~:text=(2)%20A%20person%20is%20guilty,used%20for%20any%20commercial%20purpose.

Doesnt apply because if I took up residence in another state I wouldnt hunt Washington.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: andrew_in_idaho on January 24, 2021, 08:41:56 PM
Unless youre actually going to be living in Idaho or Montana and commuting this all sounds like admission to a crime before youre committing it. This is why game wardens love the internet


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Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: idaho guy on January 25, 2021, 07:05:46 AM
Wow way to twist a simple question. It seems straightforward is it worth the state income tax and other costs to MOVE and become a resident of either Idaho or Montana. That is what I read from the op. He got everything from get a picture box (definitely the stupidest thing to try) to hes admitting to a crime  :chuckle:The higher income you are the less the move makes sense. I have a freind in Lewiston area extremely high income and it made way more sense financially to move across the river into Washington. He could buy out of state tags in every state and still be ahead. Lots of median wage earners have done the math with cost of living, vehicle registration, property taxes etc and felt it was a push. I think the math will be harder to justify around coeur d Alene as property prices and property taxes are skyrocketing. You will have to do the math personally but I would just live exactly where I want and not worry to much about saving a few bucks.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: Stein on January 25, 2021, 09:51:27 AM
 :yeah:
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: dilleytech on January 25, 2021, 12:53:37 PM
I know a guy who does it. Sounded pretty easy when he was talking about it. Hes in his 60s and says what are they going to do? Take my birthday away? Lol
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: idaho guy on January 25, 2021, 01:10:05 PM
I know a guy who does it. Sounded pretty easy when he was talking about it. Hes in his 60s and says what are they going to do? Take my birthday away? Lol
 

Does what ? If hes claiming resident status and not living there 6 months or more they wont take away his birthday but they will take his hunting privileges away for years in multiple states along with generous fines. I still believe op wants to legitimately become a resident of Idaho or Montana but work in Washington and possibly spend time there as well
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: Stein on January 25, 2021, 01:21:17 PM
People do it all the time in both directions, both with ID and OR.  You can easily live in one state and work in another, as mentioned taxes can be an issue so it makes sense to talk with a CPA before doing it as it could be more complicated than just comparing cost of living differences.

I used to work in Vancouver, WA and at our office probably 10-20% of the people lived in OR.  They paid OR income tax and the only issue was every once in a while they would get pulled over with OR plates in WA to make sure they really lived in OR and weren't trying to skip the nice WA plate fees by registering their vehicle in OR while residing in WA.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: blackveltbowhunter on January 25, 2021, 01:30:43 PM
Wow way to twist a simple question. It seems straightforward is it worth the state income tax and other costs to MOVE and become a resident of either Idaho or Montana. That is what I read from the op. He got everything from get a picture box (definitely the stupidest thing to try) to hes admitting to a crime  :chuckle:The higher income you are the less the move makes sense. I have a freind in Lewiston area extremely high income and it made way more sense financially to move across the river into Washington. He could buy out of state tags in every state and still be ahead. Lots of median wage earners have done the math with cost of living, vehicle registration, property taxes etc and felt it was a push. I think the math will be harder to justify around coeur d Alene as property prices and property taxes are skyrocketing. You will have to do the math personally but I would just live exactly where I want and not worry to much about saving a few bucks.

Perhaps I read the OP wrong. I read it as he wants move eventually. But would like to pay taxes, fees to another state like a resident, to get status for resident tags in that state. While continuing to work and reside in Washington until ready to retire.

   IMO the Huntwa legal team is probably not the best option. BUT if I were to pursue it I would start with a property purchase in the state you plan to go. That would at least establish a physical address and property tax. Might give you a single leg to stand on moving forward, then contact a reputable lawyer and find out if such a thing is a possibility.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: Shawn Ryan on January 25, 2021, 02:38:50 PM

   IMO the Huntwa legal team is probably not the best option.

This.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: andrew_in_idaho on January 25, 2021, 03:42:49 PM
Wow way to twist a simple question. It seems straightforward is it worth the state income tax and other costs to MOVE and become a resident of either Idaho or Montana. That is what I read from the op. He got everything from get a picture box (definitely the stupidest thing to try) to hes admitting to a crime  :chuckle:The higher income you are the less the move makes sense. I have a freind in Lewiston area extremely high income and it made way more sense financially to move across the river into Washington. He could buy out of state tags in every state and still be ahead. Lots of median wage earners have done the math with cost of living, vehicle registration, property taxes etc and felt it was a push. I think the math will be harder to justify around coeur d Alene as property prices and property taxes are skyrocketing. You will have to do the math personally but I would just live exactly where I want and not worry to much about saving a few bucks.
I dont read this first sentence has anyone on here gone to the effort to change their residency to Idaho or Montana while continuing to work and earn a living in Washington as a which state should I retire to question. Like my answer above stated unless he is planning to move and commute it is nothing more than admission to a crime in advance


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Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: CarbonHunter on January 25, 2021, 06:18:09 PM
If I was to change my residence to another state it would be completely legal by going to the full effort and legal requirements for residence in another state. Please keep in mind this is very common in the United States that people own property in multiple states but are only residents of one state. Montana has it written into their law that you can leave the state for work without losing your residence as long as you intend to return to the state and continue to pay state taxes.

Yes I would have a vehicle and property in the state I choose to claim residence in and I would pay tax to that state. Im not asking how to scam a resident tag as I do plan to start building my retirement house in another state while continuing to work at my current job. This is perfectly legal and Im asking for experience from people who have made the move and when they chose to change their residence.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: bear on January 25, 2021, 06:20:39 PM
You have to physically live in the state you are claiming residence
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: Stein on January 25, 2021, 06:25:32 PM
You have to physically live in the state you are claiming residence

Not true, there are exceptions.  Good example is Trump was a resident of FL but lived in Washington, DC for several years.  Overseas troops are another example.  You can also be going to school somewhere and still be a resident of your home state, my wife lived in MT for four years but was a WA resident.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: bear on January 25, 2021, 06:27:51 PM
Im aware of the few exceptions
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: Miles on January 25, 2021, 07:13:19 PM

   IMO the Huntwa legal team is probably not the best option.

This.

Ask Matt Alwine.   It worked for him for at least a few years.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: cem3434 on January 25, 2021, 10:33:39 PM
 :yeah: That's the guy I was referring too.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: andrew_in_idaho on January 26, 2021, 05:34:55 AM
If I was to change my residence to another state it would be completely legal by going to the full effort and legal requirements for residence in another state. Please keep in mind this is very common in the United States that people own property in multiple states but are only residents of one state. Montana has it written into their law that you can leave the state for work without losing your residence as long as you intend to return to the state and continue to pay state taxes.

Yes I would have a vehicle and property in the state I choose to claim residence in and I would pay tax to that state. Im not asking how to scam a resident tag as I do plan to start building my retirement house in another state while continuing to work at my current job. This is perfectly legal and Im asking for experience from people who have made the move and when they chose to change their residence.
Just owning property, licensing vehicles and paying taxes while you are in the process of building a home will not make you a legal resident of either Montana or Idaho if you continue to live in Washington. Both states pretty plainly spell out that you must reside within the borders of the state for 6 months prior to gaining resident status for the purposes of hunting. So like I said above you can live in either state and commute to and from work but you cannot live in Washington whilst preparing to live in either state and legally have resident hunting privileges


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Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: idaho guy on January 26, 2021, 06:31:07 AM
If I was to change my residence to another state it would be completely legal by going to the full effort and legal requirements for residence in another state. Please keep in mind this is very common in the United States that people own property in multiple states but are only residents of one state. Montana has it written into their law that you can leave the state for work without losing your residence as long as you intend to return to the state and continue to pay state taxes.

Yes I would have a vehicle and property in the state I choose to claim residence in and I would pay tax to that state. Im not asking how to scam a resident tag as I do plan to start building my retirement house in another state while continuing to work at my current job. This is perfectly legal and Im asking for experience from people who have made the move and when they chose to change their residence.
Just owning property, licensing vehicles and paying taxes while you are in the process of building a home will not make you a legal resident of either Montana or Idaho if you continue to live in Washington. Both states pretty plainly spell out that you must reside within the borders of the state for 6 months prior to gaining resident status for the purposes of hunting. So like I said above you can live in either state and commute to and from work but you cannot live in Washington whilst preparing to live in either state and legally have resident hunting privileges


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If I was to change my residence to another state it would be completely legal by going to the full effort and legal requirements for residence in another state. Please keep in mind this is very common in the United States that people own property in multiple states but are only residents of one state. Montana has it written into their law that you can leave the state for work without losing your residence as long as you intend to return to the state and continue to pay state taxes.

Yes I would have a vehicle and property in the state I choose to claim residence in and I would pay tax to that state. Im not asking how to scam a resident tag as I do plan to start building my retirement house in another state while continuing to work at my current job. This is perfectly legal and Im asking for experience from people who have made the move and when they chose to change their residence.
Just owning property, licensing vehicles and paying taxes while you are in the process of building a home will not make you a legal resident of either Montana or Idaho if you continue to live in Washington. Both states pretty plainly spell out that you must reside within the borders of the state for 6 months prior to gaining resident status for the purposes of hunting. So like I said above you can live in either state and commute to and from work but you cannot live in Washington whilst preparing to live in either state and legally have resident hunting privileges


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 :yeah: Idaho takes it seriously. I had a freind who was Idaho resident for 20-30 years buys his hunting tags as a resident then moved to apartment on Washington side of border because he sold his house in Idaho. They went after him for buying resident tags even though he was in the right and purchased the tags as a resident. They pay attention even though its probably a lot harder right now with thousands of new residents every day in Idaho
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: dilleytech on January 26, 2021, 09:18:26 AM
I know a guy who does it. Sounded pretty easy when he was talking about it. Hes in his 60s and says what are they going to do? Take my birthday away? Lol
 

Does what ? If hes claiming resident status and not living there 6 months or more they wont take away his birthday but they will take his hunting privileges away for years in multiple states along with generous fines. I still believe op wants to legitimately become a resident of Idaho or Montana but work in Washington and possibly spend time there as well

Hey claims residency in Wyoming and lives in WA. You know what you make when you take hunting rights away from a hunter? A poacher.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: follow maggie on January 26, 2021, 02:35:34 PM
I know a guy who does it. Sounded pretty easy when he was talking about it. Hes in his 60s and says what are they going to do? Take my birthday away? Lol
 

Does what ? If hes claiming resident status and not living there 6 months or more they wont take away his birthday but they will take his hunting privileges away for years in multiple states along with generous fines. I still believe op wants to legitimately become a resident of Idaho or Montana but work in Washington and possibly spend time there as well

Hey claims residency in Wyoming and lives in WA. You know what you make when you take hunting rights away from a hunter? A poacher.

Your friend is already a poacher.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: Miles on January 26, 2021, 04:13:19 PM
Youre not helping your friend much putting that on the internet.  Wyoming doesnt mess around.  When your phone rings.... enjoy the conversation.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: luvmystang67 on January 26, 2021, 05:30:42 PM
I moved to Idaho this year to become a resident.  I'm days away from reaching that status and getting a lifetime hunting and fishing license.

The big one is going to be the income tax.

As far as what you can get away with? I speculate that if you lived in WA, but claimed Idaho residency, had an Idaho drivers license, had a bonafide Idaho residence and used that to pay your income taxes, but actually spent more or most nights in WA, I don't think anyone would know.  I'm not saying that is legal or the intent, but I can't see how they'd know.

Now if you think you can do the PO Box thing, or any version of that, which results in you not having an Idaho drivers license and NOT paying income tax... they're def going to find you.  They want that tax money.

I hope I never have to leave, I love it here.  Apparently I'm the reason the property values are increasing, but I can't afford to buy anything, so maybe its not me after all.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: CarbonHunter on January 26, 2021, 06:41:47 PM
Thanks for the helpful comment. Are you working in other states or just in Idaho?  My situation going forward is going to put me working in multiple states and that is why Im looking for information as to when to make the move
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: whacker1 on January 26, 2021, 07:03:38 PM
Thanks for the helpful comment. Are you working in other states or just in Idaho?  My situation going forward is going to put me working in multiple states and that is why Im looking for information as to when to make the move

There are lots of people that establish residency in a given state and then work in Prudhoe Bay, North Dakota, etc.  i think you are on the right track if you are buying a house in idaho or Montana, changing residency, drivers licensure, voting, income tax, but work on the road in multiple states.  Very common event for truck drivers, construction workers, sales people, etc. 

I live in Spokane, but i can say that i will have spent more days in Idaho at our secondary property since October 30th due to the kids learning online and working remotely.   averaging about 4-5 days per week.   Does that put me in a path for no longer being a Washington resident?  No, my wife got jury duty summons for spokane county yesterday, my kids are still registered and participating in the spokane school district, etc.   There is a common sense approach to this endeavor.  More power to you on your goal to find a new residence and retirement property.   I do the math on income tax about once per month for Idaho and montana and it doesn't pencil for us yet.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: luvmystang67 on January 26, 2021, 07:35:38 PM
Thanks for the helpful comment. Are you working in other states or just in Idaho?  My situation going forward is going to put me working in multiple states and that is why Im looking for information as to when to make the move

I technically work in WA, but right now that is remote so its a little skewed.  I'm not sure the world is ready for how remote work plays a role.

I could PROBABLY get away with not claiming Idaho residence if I wasn't a hunter, which would keep me from paying state income taxes.  It would be officially not legal, but I think I could get away with it.  However, our ENTIRE purpose for moving her was establishing residency for lifetime licenses, so I'll need to claim residency and pay the income tax.

If it helps, the best I can tell is that Idaho takes your total Jan-Dec income and multiplies it by their rate (which is almost 7%), multiplied again by the number of days you were a resident divided by 365.  So if you made 120k in 2021, and were in Idaho for December, then you'd pay income tax on 10k of it.  Or you could apply it to the rate, either way you get the idea.  If I make a ton in WA in Jan-June and then move to Idaho jobless in September, I still will owe some income tax to Idaho because of my earlier employment that year when I was a non resident.  Just a thing to keep in mind.

I do think WA is more favorable from a tax perspective, depending on what you buy.  Income tax here is 6%, Sales tax (on everything, even food) is 6% and yeah fuel is cheaper, but if you're like me, you'd prefer no state income tax and no tax on food.  But hunting is great, no weird gun laws (yet), fewer people...  all that is pretty great.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: whacker1 on January 26, 2021, 08:00:06 PM
Thanks for the helpful comment. Are you working in other states or just in Idaho?  My situation going forward is going to put me working in multiple states and that is why Im looking for information as to when to make the move

I technically work in WA, but right now that is remote so its a little skewed.  I'm not sure the world is ready for how remote work plays a role.

I could PROBABLY get away with not claiming Idaho residence if I wasn't a hunter, which would keep me from paying state income taxes.  It would be officially not legal, but I think I could get away with it.  However, our ENTIRE purpose for moving her was establishing residency for lifetime licenses, so I'll need to claim residency and pay the income tax.

If it helps, the best I can tell is that Idaho takes your total Jan-Dec income and multiplies it by their rate (which is almost 7%), multiplied again by the number of days you were a resident divided by 365.  So if you made 120k in 2021, and were in Idaho for December, then you'd pay income tax on 10k of it.  Or you could apply it to the rate, either way you get the idea.  If I make a ton in WA in Jan-June and then move to Idaho jobless in September, I still will owe some income tax to Idaho because of my earlier employment that year when I was a non resident.  Just a thing to keep in mind.

I do think WA is more favorable from a tax perspective, depending on what you buy.  Income tax here is 6%, Sales tax (on everything, even food) is 6% and yeah fuel is cheaper, but if you're like me, you'd prefer no state income tax and no tax on food.  But hunting is great, no weird gun laws (yet), fewer people...  all that is pretty great.

well said.  Property tax is lower in Idaho also.  But climbing as assessed values are climbing with the influx of foreigners.    Idaho also has a capital gains tax that washington does not.  Idaho does not have an estate tax.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: whacker1 on January 26, 2021, 08:07:56 PM
CarbonHunter is looking at Montana, so he is also favorable in no sales tax.
Montana has a 6.90% income tax in the 7th bracket of 7 brackets for the state.
capital gains tax in montana is 2%
lower gas tax than Washington and simliar to Idaho.
Property taxes in montana i believe vary quite a bit by county.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: Stein on January 26, 2021, 08:28:43 PM
Property tax is going to vary widely depending on where in WA you are coming from and where you are going.  When I looked at it, moving from Arlington to Livingston meant spending more for a house, more on property tax (percentage as well as overall) and more on other taxes (income vs sales).  As we all know, property tax depends on the school, fire, police, ambulance, hospital, whatever other levy that exists.  My prospective move would be the equivalent of about a 10% reduction in income give or take for our specific situation.

If you are coming from Mercer Island and moving to Two Dot, it's going to be a very different picture.  If you live in Snohomish and buy a new truck, boat, snowmobiles and ORV every other year, you are going to be paying a bunch more in tax than I do as well.

Home prices in MT are hugely variable, my brother just sold a very average 70's split level on a normal city lot for $650k in Bozeman and the same house 3 hours away in Great Falls you would be lucky to get $250k.  Taxes in Bozeman are stiff, great new schools, shiny new fire trucks and stations, nice parks all over the place, trails, etc.  In Great Falls, not so much.  I'm not sure about ID, but I bet it's at least similar.

A guy needs to look at it with a fairly tight view, you really can't compare WA to MT or ID at the state level with any sort of relevant outcome.

Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: whacker1 on January 26, 2021, 08:40:57 PM
Property tax is going to vary widely depending on where in WA you are coming from and where you are going.  When I looked at it, moving from Arlington to Livingston meant spending more for a house, more on property tax (percentage as well as overall) and more on other taxes (income vs sales).  As we all know, property tax depends on the school, fire, police, ambulance, hospital, whatever other levy that exists.  My prospective move would be the equivalent of about a 10% reduction in income give or take for our specific situation.

If you are coming from Mercer Island and moving to Two Dot, it's going to be a very different picture.  If you live in Snohomish and buy a new truck, boat, snowmobiles and ORV every other year, you are going to be paying a bunch more in tax than I do as well.

Home prices in MT are hugely variable, my brother just sold a very average 70's split level on a normal city lot for $650k in Bozeman and the same house 3 hours away in Great Falls you would be lucky to get $250k.  Taxes in Bozeman are stiff, great new schools, shiny new fire trucks and stations, nice parks all over the place, trails, etc.  In Great Falls, not so much.  I'm not sure about ID, but I bet it's at least similar.

A guy needs to look at it with a fairly tight view, you really can't compare WA to MT or ID at the state level with any sort of relevant outcome.

Also, well said.   too many considerations to make it simple.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: luvmystang67 on January 27, 2021, 08:31:23 AM
Property tax is going to vary widely depending on where in WA you are coming from and where you are going.  When I looked at it, moving from Arlington to Livingston meant spending more for a house, more on property tax (percentage as well as overall) and more on other taxes (income vs sales).  As we all know, property tax depends on the school, fire, police, ambulance, hospital, whatever other levy that exists.  My prospective move would be the equivalent of about a 10% reduction in income give or take for our specific situation.

If you are coming from Mercer Island and moving to Two Dot, it's going to be a very different picture.  If you live in Snohomish and buy a new truck, boat, snowmobiles and ORV every other year, you are going to be paying a bunch more in tax than I do as well.

Home prices in MT are hugely variable, my brother just sold a very average 70's split level on a normal city lot for $650k in Bozeman and the same house 3 hours away in Great Falls you would be lucky to get $250k.  Taxes in Bozeman are stiff, great new schools, shiny new fire trucks and stations, nice parks all over the place, trails, etc.  In Great Falls, not so much.  I'm not sure about ID, but I bet it's at least similar.

A guy needs to look at it with a fairly tight view, you really can't compare WA to MT or ID at the state level with any sort of relevant outcome.

Also, well said.   too many considerations to make it simple.

If you have a good salary, but are a saver and don't like expensive things then I think WA is better.  I make a decent living, but I like to shop at garage sales.  I buy all my vehicles private party.  I don't eat out.  I invest in the market and do have capital gains often.  I think financially I'm better off in WA.  Right now in Coeur d'Alene, a house ACTUALLY costs as much as a comparable house in Greenlake.  Don't get me wrong, I don't want to live in Greenlake, but that very concept is fairly ridiculous.  Also, Idaho consistently ranks VERY low in quality of education, probably due to their very low property taxes.  If you have kids, you might want to weigh that.  As you're talking retirement, this probably isn't a concern.

For me, I can buy a lot of NR elk tags for the income tax hit.  I'd probably be best financially to live in Spokane.  Especially when I already have the Idaho lifetime license (5 days!).
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: dilleytech on January 27, 2021, 12:39:32 PM
I know a guy who does it. Sounded pretty easy when he was talking about it. Hes in his 60s and says what are they going to do? Take my birthday away? Lol
 

Does what ? If hes claiming resident status and not living there 6 months or more they wont take away his birthday but they will take his hunting privileges away for years in multiple states along with generous fines. I still believe op wants to legitimately become a resident of Idaho or Montana but work in Washington and possibly spend time there as well

Hey claims residency in Wyoming and lives in WA. You know what you make when you take hunting rights away from a hunter? A poacher.

Your friend is already a poacher.

👍
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: NiteHawk on January 27, 2021, 12:57:11 PM
I think the main thing is ensuring you don't have resident licenses in two states during the same year and that you are abiding by MT and WA laws. You will want to know any special MT laws regarding residency (residing in MT, living in MT for the specified amount of time before buying resident license, etc.). It's very easy for the state departments of FW to find people claiming residency in two states. The timing of any transition to residency in another state requires attention to detail in order to stay legal.

The rest of it is just figuring out if it pencils out for you personally.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: Stein on January 27, 2021, 12:58:37 PM
What do you do if you become a resident of another state in the middle of a license season?  Is there a way to turn your WA license in before you buy the new resident one in another state?
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: kselkhunter on January 27, 2021, 01:24:54 PM
What do you do if you become a resident of another state in the middle of a license season?  Is there a way to turn your WA license in before you buy the new resident one in another state?

The states do communicate and will know if you're holding a resident hunting license in two states.   So as soon as you make the move to a new state, you go into your WDFW profile and switch it to non-resident status.  Unfortunately, most states have a wait period to establish residency for hunting licenses.  Oregon is 6 months.   So when I made the move back to OR from WA last year, from a department of fish and wildlife perspective I was not a resident of any state for 6 months.   OR requires changing your drivers license within 30 days of arrival, and that triggers your non-resident status in WA if a officer stops you while hunting in WA and you're holding a resident hunting license and out of state DL (I asked both WDFW and WSP).   And I couldn't buy a resident license in OR for 6 months (to the day) after my move date that I entered into ODFW profile.   So I just sherpa'd for friends last fall as I wasn't going to pay for an OR non-resident tag, and I couldn't hunt my WA resident tag or special permit anymore (not legally). 


It is what it is.  Just understand you're likely paying non-resident fees that first year to the state you move to.....unless you can time your move to be just after your fall hunting season in WA, and in time to reach the minimum wait period for the new state in time for their spring application period if that state requires you to buy a hunting license as part of special controlled permit applications.   

Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: CarbonHunter on January 27, 2021, 06:11:43 PM
Thanks for the input. I am looking at both Montana and Idaho but so far Montana looks to be a better place to build a future. I was planning on waiting till I was closer to retirement to start the process but with Idaho changing their NR rules Im thinking of making the move sooner so that I can hunt the same area each year.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: whacker1 on January 28, 2021, 09:20:52 AM
Thanks for the input. I am looking at both Montana and Idaho but so far Montana looks to be a better place to build a future. I was planning on waiting till I was closer to retirement to start the process but with Idaho changing their NR rules Im thinking of making the move sooner so that I can hunt the same area each year.

 :tup:
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: Ridgeratt on January 28, 2021, 09:37:02 AM
This was in the news a few days ago:

https://www.krem.com/article/money/consumer/north-idaho-real-estate-market/293-2b421700-5aef-4f8d-99db-6be908f804be

'I can't afford to live here': North Idaho housing prices skyrocket amid low inventory
Real estate agents say the North Idaho market is one of the most competitive they have ever seen, partly due to people from out of state buying up land.

Author: Morgan Trau (KREM)
Published: 6:45 PM PST January 23, 2021
Updated: 11:57 AM PST January 25, 2021

COEUR D'ALENE, Idaho North Idaho is known for its lakes, mountains and miles of land. But out-of-state buyers are purchasing that open land at a record pace.

The real estate market is booming. This is excellent for sellers but awful for buyers.

"It's really disheartening, you really think, 'Am I ever going to be able to get into a home?'" asked former Idaho resident Shannon Davis. "I can't afford to live here."


The pandemic should have decreased the Panhandle's housing prices or at least that's what Davis thought. The market did the opposite.

"It's just really depressing to not be able to have the finances to keep going up," she added. "The price just keeps going up and up and up with competition."

Davis moved to Spokane Valley, Washington, and is currently renting. She hopes to return to a city like Coeur d'Alene, Hayden or Post Falls soon.

"We're looking at the lowest inventory that we've ever seen," Haven Real Estate Group owner Cambria Henry said. "I just can't get over the prices of these homes."

Henry said the North Idaho market is the most competitive she has ever seen it.

There is one seller for every 15-20 buyers for their average priced homes. Even multi-million dollar homes have multiple offers, Henry added.

There are not even enough homes available to do a full evaluation of buyers to sellers ratio per price limit, like was shown in the Spokane market analysis.

RELATED: Spokane's rapid growth is causing housing prices to increase


Credit: Morgan Trau
Buyers to Sellers in North Idaho
There are currently 13 stick built homes in Post Falls and Coeur d'Alene has 22, she said. In January 2020, Post Falls had 215 homes on the market. In January 2021, there were 63.

The lowest price in Post Falls is $425,000 and in Coeur d'Alene is $312,000. A house in the $300,000 range is a rarity and the next lowest price after is $525,000, she showed.

This could be due to a decrease in people moving around locally and an increase in people moving in from out of state.

"We're finding that people, especially now that they are working from home, the commutes not such a big deal," Henry said. "So there's a lot of people from California and Portland that are just buying land."


The out-of-staters are planning on building in the next 10 years, she said. Right now, they are buying the land while it is relatively affordable in comparison to bigger city prices.

"They're coming up and having no problems finding a place, and to them, it's a deal," Davis added. "But it hurts us, the people that are here in the community that are really trying to find a place to buy and to live in."

Henry said there are no signs of the competition easing anytime soon. So the best thing buyers can do is just keep trying and work with an agent to get their foot in the door and get them the best price.

Online estimates, like on real estate app Zillow, are untrustworthy, according to Henry.

"The Zestimate is completely inaccurate because Idaho is a non-disclosure state, which means when you sell that home, you don't go and disclose [the actual price] anywhere," Henry added. "We don't post publicly what that home actually sold for."

Often times, homes are overvalued or undervalued on the site.

"We'll save, we'll try to earn that money for a down payment, but prices keep going up, too." Davis said. "And so, the more we save, the more out of reach it still is for us."

Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: luvmystang67 on January 28, 2021, 10:56:47 AM
I'm one of the people that article mentions.  I cannot afford to buy here.   :bash:
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: whacker1 on January 28, 2021, 11:04:16 AM
This was in the news a few days ago:

https://www.krem.com/article/money/consumer/north-idaho-real-estate-market/293-2b421700-5aef-4f8d-99db-6be908f804be

'I can't afford to live here': North Idaho housing prices skyrocket amid low inventory
Real estate agents say the North Idaho market is one of the most competitive they have ever seen, partly due to people from out of state buying up land.

Author: Morgan Trau (KREM)
Published: 6:45 PM PST January 23, 2021
Updated: 11:57 AM PST January 25, 2021

COEUR D'ALENE, Idaho North Idaho is known for its lakes, mountains and miles of land. But out-of-state buyers are purchasing that open land at a record pace.

The real estate market is booming. This is excellent for sellers but awful for buyers.

"It's really disheartening, you really think, 'Am I ever going to be able to get into a home?'" asked former Idaho resident Shannon Davis. "I can't afford to live here."


The pandemic should have decreased the Panhandle's housing prices or at least that's what Davis thought. The market did the opposite.

"It's just really depressing to not be able to have the finances to keep going up," she added. "The price just keeps going up and up and up with competition."

Davis moved to Spokane Valley, Washington, and is currently renting. She hopes to return to a city like Coeur d'Alene, Hayden or Post Falls soon.

"We're looking at the lowest inventory that we've ever seen," Haven Real Estate Group owner Cambria Henry said. "I just can't get over the prices of these homes."

Henry said the North Idaho market is the most competitive she has ever seen it.

There is one seller for every 15-20 buyers for their average priced homes. Even multi-million dollar homes have multiple offers, Henry added.

There are not even enough homes available to do a full evaluation of buyers to sellers ratio per price limit, like was shown in the Spokane market analysis.

RELATED: Spokane's rapid growth is causing housing prices to increase


Credit: Morgan Trau
Buyers to Sellers in North Idaho
There are currently 13 stick built homes in Post Falls and Coeur d'Alene has 22, she said. In January 2020, Post Falls had 215 homes on the market. In January 2021, there were 63.

The lowest price in Post Falls is $425,000 and in Coeur d'Alene is $312,000. A house in the $300,000 range is a rarity and the next lowest price after is $525,000, she showed.

This could be due to a decrease in people moving around locally and an increase in people moving in from out of state.

"We're finding that people, especially now that they are working from home, the commutes not such a big deal," Henry said. "So there's a lot of people from California and Portland that are just buying land."


The out-of-staters are planning on building in the next 10 years, she said. Right now, they are buying the land while it is relatively affordable in comparison to bigger city prices.

"They're coming up and having no problems finding a place, and to them, it's a deal," Davis added. "But it hurts us, the people that are here in the community that are really trying to find a place to buy and to live in."

Henry said there are no signs of the competition easing anytime soon. So the best thing buyers can do is just keep trying and work with an agent to get their foot in the door and get them the best price.

Online estimates, like on real estate app Zillow, are untrustworthy, according to Henry.

"The Zestimate is completely inaccurate because Idaho is a non-disclosure state, which means when you sell that home, you don't go and disclose [the actual price] anywhere," Henry added. "We don't post publicly what that home actually sold for."

Often times, homes are overvalued or undervalued on the site.

"We'll save, we'll try to earn that money for a down payment, but prices keep going up, too." Davis said. "And so, the more we save, the more out of reach it still is for us."

As of yesterday, Spokane Valley had 1 week of inventory.  In the last 2 decades, inventory has never fallen below 1 month worth of inventory.   It is regional, not just North Idaho
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: follow maggie on January 28, 2021, 02:08:44 PM
The article is right about the zestimate from Zillow being junk. When I sold my house is Bremerton last summer it was $47,000 low.
Title: Re: Claiming residence in another state
Post by: Stein on January 28, 2021, 02:16:27 PM
Inventory shortage is pretty much a nationwide thing.  Few places aren't experiencing it.  PNW is at or near the top of the list for sure.
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