Hunting Washington Forum

Big Game Hunting => Backcountry Hunting => Topic started by: bowman on July 26, 2021, 03:10:33 PM

Title: High Hunt Clothing
Post by: bowman on July 26, 2021, 03:10:33 PM
What does everyone take for clothing on the high hunt when backpacking?  There is a lot of topics on gear, but not much to be found on clothing.  Lets say you are planning for a 7 day hunt in the Pasayten.  What are you bringing as far as clothing?
Title: Re: High Hunt Clothing
Post by: Skyvalhunter on July 26, 2021, 03:13:35 PM
Depends on the weather outlook. Can get cool in higher elevations and of coarse rain and or snow is potential
Title: Re: High Hunt Clothing
Post by: ian_padron on July 26, 2021, 03:48:39 PM
Last year on the 17th I was hiking back to camp around 3pm in my underwear, it was 83 degrees and smoky AF.

The year prior we spent the better part of 5 straight days waiting out storms, including one of the gnarliest white outs I've ever experienced.

In 2018, I killed a buck on the 19th, my InReach said 17 degrees when I crawled out of my sleeping bag at 7k feet lol.

You really have to watch the forecast and be ready to adjust on the fly in the days leading up to your hunt.

The most versatile clothing kit would look something like this, starting from the ground up:

Feet: 2 pairs of mid-weight merino hiking/hunting socks, 1 pair of lightweight athletic socks for the hike in, uninsulated mountain boot of your choice.

Legs: 2 pairs merino or synthetic underwear (one worn on the way in), 1 pair of synthetic or merino long johns. I usually pack a pair of puffy pants as well, morning glassing sessions at 7500 feet can be frigid. 1 pair durable and fast drying hunting pants, shorts to wear on the hike in.

Upper Body: Merino quarter zip x2, hooded fleece mid-layer, puffy, hardshell. That's it. Anything else is dead weight. I'm considering dropping down to 1 quarter zip but like to have a backup in the event I get soaked, especially since merino takes forever to dry.

Hands/Head/Neck: light/midweight windproof gloves, down glassing mittens (often overkill but when you need them, you NEED them), neck gaiter (most underrated piece hands down), wind-proof beanie.

That will get it done on all but the most insane September hunts. Be mindful in the Pasayten, the forecast is quite frequently VERY wrong, especially in certain pockets back there. Lots of weird systems move in-out quickly and without a whole lot of warning. Better to be safe and pack extra layers, than to get caught shivering in your tent for a couple days.

Title: Re: High Hunt Clothing
Post by: ganghis on July 26, 2021, 04:26:58 PM
That's a great list - merino is expensive but awesome at preventing funky smells from getting locked into your clothes.

The only thing I'd add is possible additional rain gear especially on the wet side.  If it's going to be really wet, you might consider a rain pant / gaiter combination (just the rain pants will drain water onto you're boots, but the gaiters dissipate some of that).  Don't get me wrong, your boots will still probably end up soaked but it would prolong the inevitable.  Rain pants can be loud but can make things a lot more comfortable if it's dumping.  If rain isn't forecast to be that bad I might just take gaiters and deal with wet legs.

Title: Re: High Hunt Clothing
Post by: jstone on July 26, 2021, 04:28:21 PM
I have had it snow during early archery elk. Watch the weather and bring something extra just in case.
Title: Re: High Hunt Clothing
Post by: Jpmiller on July 26, 2021, 06:41:11 PM
I've been told I'm dumb but I've never had it bite me, I go in wearing what I come out in and it's always wool. Wool socks, wool boxers, wool long johns if possibly needed (or in the pack), wool undershirt, wool over shirt, wool pants, and a rain jacket that's synthetic. I've never needed extras and since wool drys fast and keeps warm when wet it's not that big a deal to wash it if needed (assuming water availability). I've got partners who run slot of synthetic fabrics and it always seems to be noisier, smellier, and ripping.

I do throw on gaiters if it's westside wet brush or snows possible.
Title: Re: High Hunt Clothing
Post by: teanawayslayer on July 26, 2021, 07:44:17 PM
Clean underwear!
Title: Re: High Hunt Clothing
Post by: SpicyTacos on August 03, 2021, 07:01:07 AM
Merino wool.

Darn tough

First lite

Simlair brands

Two brands that are too notch. You pay the big bucks up front. However the payoff is huge. Keeps you warm, drys fast and provides sun protection up in the high country.
Title: Re: High Hunt Clothing
Post by: predatorG on September 01, 2021, 03:08:13 PM
Merino wool.

Darn tough

First lite

Simlair brands

Two brands that are too notch. You pay the big bucks up front. However the payoff is huge. Keeps you warm, drys fast and provides sun protection up in the high country.

The poster here reminded me of another good backcountry rule I often forget: No eating spicy tacos the night before leaving!!
Title: Re: High Hunt Clothing
Post by: yakimanoob on September 09, 2021, 11:11:04 AM
One reason you see less chatter about clothing is that what works is extremely dependant on the individual. What works for me may be very uncomfortable/dysfunctional for you. 

FWIW, here's my system.  I typically carry one set of gear for when I'm not sleeping, and one set (typically of just baselayers) to wear when I'm in my sleeping bag.  This helps me stay MUCH less stanky and generally a lot more comfortable.  For example, it's a lot easier to keep your chin up and stay focused on the hunt when you're wet, cold, and dirty, so long as you know you have clean, dry clothes and a warm bag to crawl into that night. 

For when I'm outside my sleeping bag:
- 1 pair darn tough hiking socks
- prana stretch zion hiking pants
- free fly bamboo boxer briefs (or outdoor research echo boxer briefs, depending on what's clean when I leave  :chuckle:)
- Kuhl "airkuhl" sun hooded ls shirt
- Patagonia Nanopuff insulated jacket
- OR Ferrosi softshell jacket
- hat
- beanie
- sunglasses
- OR Foray rain jacket
- Black Diamond gaiters

Depending on the weather I may also carry:
- MH down pants (these things were a gift from my wife and they weight nothing and are SO NICE when it's cold out)
- MH Phantom puffy down jacket
- OR Foray rain pants
- OR Cirque II softshell pants (I hike VERY warm, so it has to be pretty dang cold for me to bring these along)
- various pairs of gloves depending on the situation

For sleeping (and there for emergencies):
- a pair of Black Diamond wool-blend long johns
- Patagonia Capilene thermal-weight top
- a pair of darn tough socks (or fluffy smartwool socks if it's really cold)
SimplePortal 2.3.7 © 2008-2021, SimplePortal