collapse
Visit R&R Calls

Author Topic: Rabbit Hunting this fall  (Read 5848 times)

Offline Cougartail

  • Political Topics
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Longhunter
  • *****
  • Join Date: Oct 2012
  • Posts: 591
  • Location: Eastern Washington
Re: Rabbit Hunting this fall
« Reply #15 on: July 09, 2018, 07:53:54 PM »

Hi Guys,   :hello:
I was thinking about going over to eastern Washington this fall to hunt some rabbits (cottontail).
Anyone here have any advice where to go?  I have no dog, I'll be doing some walking.
JC   :hello:

We are at the cyclic high for rabbits in my area. Walk old sagebrush 4x4 roads and you should do well.

Offline W_Ellison2011

  • Non-Hunting Topics
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Scout
  • ****
  • Join Date: May 2011
  • Posts: 449
  • Location: Graham, Wa
Re: Rabbit Hunting this fall
« Reply #16 on: July 10, 2018, 02:52:45 PM »
Always heard to look at the liver  and if it has black spots don't eat it . Any insight on this ?
I would assume any abnormailities would be a good sign to not eat it. Most stuff will cook out but better safe than sorry imo. I have shot a few out of my parents property with a pellet rifle that had lumps all over their bodies. Never checked to see if it was tumors or something else. Hit a chipmunk last year with my truck, by accident, went back to check on him and he had large bumps all over with openings. Put on gloves and squeezed one and a HUGE larva came out. Looked like a botfly larva I have seen on youtube videos but I can't confirm. Made me rethink cleaning rabbit and grouse with my bare hands.

Offline jackelope

  • Administrator
  • Trade Count: (+22)
  • Legend
  • *****
  • Join Date: Mar 2007
  • Posts: 37886
  • Location: Duvall, WA
  • Groups: WSB RMGA NRA RMEF BHA
Re: Rabbit Hunting this fall
« Reply #17 on: July 10, 2018, 04:34:52 PM »
I'd always heard that too, but turns out it's bogus.   Cold weather doesn't kill the parasites or do anything else to the rabbit other than increase calorie demands which if the rabbits are sick may not be able to meet the demands of staying warm.

Tulerma doesn't survive cooking, so wearing gloves and not picking your nose while cleaning a rabbit would prevent getting Tulerma yourself.


Quote
TULAREMIA (Rabbit Fever)

Tularemia is a bacterial disease that can affect both animals and people. Many wild animals are infected, especially rabbits (snowshoe hare) and rodents (muskrats and beavers). The clinical signs of disease in wildlife are not always present or easily recognized. Infected rabbits may run slowly, appear tame or in a stupor, stagger and are easily captured. Carcasses can have white spots scattered throughout the liver.

There are several ways tularemia can be transmitted or spread to people from animals. The most common way is from contact of bare skin or mucous membranes (skin around the nose, eyes, and mouth) with animal blood or tissue while handling (dressing or skinning) infected wild animals. This includes handling and eating insufficiently cooked meat. Tularemia can also be spread by some external parasites (ticks and deer flies). Less common means are inhaling dust from contaminated soil, drinking from contaminated water or handling contaminated pelts or paws of animals.

In people, the clinical symptoms of illness depend upon the method tularemia was spread. Skin infections, especially around fingernails, and swollen glands are the usual symptoms of disease as a result of improper handling of infected animals. Ingestion or eating the organism may produce a throat infection, diarrhea and vomiting. Inhaling the organism may produce a fever and pneumonia-like illness.

Take the following precautions to help prevent the transmission of tularemia and other diseases:

Follow animal-handling precautions. Wear waterproof gloves, wash your hands and prevent skin contact.
Thoroughly cook meat (well-done).
Prevent insect bites.
Do not drink from untreated water sources such as lakes, streams and rivers.




Did you ever see any health issues with your domestic meat rabbits?
:fire.:

" In today's instant gratification society, more and more pressure revolves around success and the measurement of one's prowess as a hunter by inches on a score chart or field photos produced on social media. Don't fall into the trap. Hunting is-and always will be- about the hunt, the adventure, the views, and time spent with close friends and family. " Ryan Hatfield

My posts, opinions and statements do not represent those of this forum

Offline jdb

  • the illustious potentate
  • Non-Hunting Topics
  • Trade Count: (+1)
  • Frontiersman
  • *****
  • Join Date: Jul 2007
  • Posts: 3182
  • Location: selah
Re: Rabbit Hunting this fall
« Reply #18 on: July 10, 2018, 05:31:42 PM »

Hi Guys,   :hello:
I was thinking about going over to eastern Washington this fall to hunt some rabbits (cottontail).
Anyone here have any advice where to go?  I have no dog, I'll be doing some walking.
JC   :hello:

We are at the cyclic high for rabbits in my area. Walk old sagebrush 4x4 roads and you should do well.
for sure. I see probably 10 every morning. I had 6 in my yards a couple nights ago
nuke the gray whales for jesus!

Offline KFhunter

  • Global Moderator
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Explorer
  • *****
  • Join Date: Jan 2011
  • Posts: 16303
  • Location: The Wedge
  • My posts do not reflect an official opinion of HW
Re: Rabbit Hunting this fall
« Reply #19 on: July 12, 2018, 12:59:10 PM »
I'd always heard that too, but turns out it's bogus.   Cold weather doesn't kill the parasites or do anything else to the rabbit other than increase calorie demands which if the rabbits are sick may not be able to meet the demands of staying warm.

Tulerma doesn't survive cooking, so wearing gloves and not picking your nose while cleaning a rabbit would prevent getting Tulerma yourself.


Quote
TULAREMIA (Rabbit Fever)

Tularemia is a bacterial disease that can affect both animals and people. Many wild animals are infected, especially rabbits (snowshoe hare) and rodents (muskrats and beavers). The clinical signs of disease in wildlife are not always present or easily recognized. Infected rabbits may run slowly, appear tame or in a stupor, stagger and are easily captured. Carcasses can have white spots scattered throughout the liver.

There are several ways tularemia can be transmitted or spread to people from animals. The most common way is from contact of bare skin or mucous membranes (skin around the nose, eyes, and mouth) with animal blood or tissue while handling (dressing or skinning) infected wild animals. This includes handling and eating insufficiently cooked meat. Tularemia can also be spread by some external parasites (ticks and deer flies). Less common means are inhaling dust from contaminated soil, drinking from contaminated water or handling contaminated pelts or paws of animals.

In people, the clinical symptoms of illness depend upon the method tularemia was spread. Skin infections, especially around fingernails, and swollen glands are the usual symptoms of disease as a result of improper handling of infected animals. Ingestion or eating the organism may produce a throat infection, diarrhea and vomiting. Inhaling the organism may produce a fever and pneumonia-like illness.

Take the following precautions to help prevent the transmission of tularemia and other diseases:

Follow animal-handling precautions. Wear waterproof gloves, wash your hands and prevent skin contact.
Thoroughly cook meat (well-done).
Prevent insect bites.
Do not drink from untreated water sources such as lakes, streams and rivers.




Did you ever see any health issues with your domestic meat rabbits?

Nope, all was clean and I disinfected the hutch every so often with bleach solution then pressure washed it out.  I had a bunch of cages I could hold the rabbits in while doing so. 
Any new rabbits were quarantined away from the main hutch, plus I didn't get a lot of outside interaction with rabbits as you would in the show world, so I never seen any pasturella. 

Lost a buck to heat, was on the sunnier side of the hutch.

Offline jackelope

  • Administrator
  • Trade Count: (+22)
  • Legend
  • *****
  • Join Date: Mar 2007
  • Posts: 37886
  • Location: Duvall, WA
  • Groups: WSB RMGA NRA RMEF BHA
Re: Rabbit Hunting this fall
« Reply #20 on: July 12, 2018, 02:03:11 PM »
I'd always heard that too, but turns out it's bogus.   Cold weather doesn't kill the parasites or do anything else to the rabbit other than increase calorie demands which if the rabbits are sick may not be able to meet the demands of staying warm.

Tulerma doesn't survive cooking, so wearing gloves and not picking your nose while cleaning a rabbit would prevent getting Tulerma yourself.


Quote
TULAREMIA (Rabbit Fever)

Tularemia is a bacterial disease that can affect both animals and people. Many wild animals are infected, especially rabbits (snowshoe hare) and rodents (muskrats and beavers). The clinical signs of disease in wildlife are not always present or easily recognized. Infected rabbits may run slowly, appear tame or in a stupor, stagger and are easily captured. Carcasses can have white spots scattered throughout the liver.

There are several ways tularemia can be transmitted or spread to people from animals. The most common way is from contact of bare skin or mucous membranes (skin around the nose, eyes, and mouth) with animal blood or tissue while handling (dressing or skinning) infected wild animals. This includes handling and eating insufficiently cooked meat. Tularemia can also be spread by some external parasites (ticks and deer flies). Less common means are inhaling dust from contaminated soil, drinking from contaminated water or handling contaminated pelts or paws of animals.

In people, the clinical symptoms of illness depend upon the method tularemia was spread. Skin infections, especially around fingernails, and swollen glands are the usual symptoms of disease as a result of improper handling of infected animals. Ingestion or eating the organism may produce a throat infection, diarrhea and vomiting. Inhaling the organism may produce a fever and pneumonia-like illness.

Take the following precautions to help prevent the transmission of tularemia and other diseases:

Follow animal-handling precautions. Wear waterproof gloves, wash your hands and prevent skin contact.
Thoroughly cook meat (well-done).
Prevent insect bites.
Do not drink from untreated water sources such as lakes, streams and rivers.




Did you ever see any health issues with your domestic meat rabbits?

Nope, all was clean and I disinfected the hutch every so often with bleach solution then pressure washed it out.  I had a bunch of cages I could hold the rabbits in while doing so. 
Any new rabbits were quarantined away from the main hutch, plus I didn't get a lot of outside interaction with rabbits as you would in the show world, so I never seen any pasturella. 

Lost a buck to heat, was on the sunnier side of the hutch.

That's great. So far we're disease free here 3+years now. Starting to help a buddy with raising meat rabbits recently. They're beasts. I see more issues with disease from folks who let their rabbits run around in the grass. They pick up all kinds of stuff from that.


:fire.:

" In today's instant gratification society, more and more pressure revolves around success and the measurement of one's prowess as a hunter by inches on a score chart or field photos produced on social media. Don't fall into the trap. Hunting is-and always will be- about the hunt, the adventure, the views, and time spent with close friends and family. " Ryan Hatfield

My posts, opinions and statements do not represent those of this forum

Offline Gobble Doc

  • Non-Hunting Topics
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Sourdough
  • *****
  • Join Date: Apr 2010
  • Posts: 2122
  • Location: Snohomish, WA
Re: Rabbit Hunting this fall
« Reply #21 on: July 13, 2018, 04:24:45 PM »
A lot of the rabbits by our place start to thin out by hunting season it seems. I think it's the yotes.

Offline W_Ellison2011

  • Non-Hunting Topics
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Scout
  • ****
  • Join Date: May 2011
  • Posts: 449
  • Location: Graham, Wa
Re: Rabbit Hunting this fall
« Reply #22 on: July 13, 2018, 08:38:14 PM »
A lot of the rabbits by our place start to thin out by hunting season it seems. I think it's the yotes.
I know a quick way to fix that issue lol! We started clearing coyotes out of my parents place and the rabbits have come back pretty strong. 8 coyotes in a little over a year off the property just from my father looking into the pasture and catching one moving through. Mossberg mvp varmin in .223/5.56 topped with a 3-9 scope and 55 gr bullets take care of them really quick!

Offline brokentrail

  • Non-Hunting Topics
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Pilgrim
  • *
  • Join Date: Oct 2016
  • Posts: 7
  • Location: Graham, WA
Re: Rabbit Hunting this fall
« Reply #23 on: July 24, 2018, 09:16:08 PM »
I've grown up running rabbits with beagles and still do.  I start hunting when season opens in September and eat every rabbit I kill.  I can assume the frost comment is related to warbles which I have seen on rabbits and squirrels in my past but never here in Washington State.  They were prevalent in Tennessee, West Virginia, Missouri and Illinois when I was a kid though and I was always told the same thing, only hunt after the first hard frost.

I only hunt rabbits on the West Side so I can't comment on warbles or other parasites on the East Side.

Andy

 

* Recent Topics

GPS Advice Sought by havershap
[Today at 05:05:42 AM]


Found 6x7 bull looking for shooter!!!! by adamR
[Today at 04:47:58 AM]


Nate's bear by JakeLand
[Today at 04:31:05 AM]


Howa by dc
[Today at 04:30:13 AM]


Spikes by Timberstalker
[Today at 04:23:52 AM]


Who loves brisket? by Blacklab
[Today at 04:05:48 AM]


Mt. View Unit by huntnnw
[Today at 03:44:09 AM]


Upgrade or use what I have by biggfish
[Today at 03:17:54 AM]


Mule deer-my favorite buck pics by elkrack
[Today at 12:55:57 AM]


People messing with game cams, NOT OK!! by elkrack
[Today at 12:53:29 AM]


Alaska Bound!! by redi
[Today at 12:04:31 AM]


Littlerock elk heard by BlackRiverTaxidermy
[Yesterday at 11:44:51 PM]


WTB - Dog Blind by Old Dog
[Yesterday at 11:26:43 PM]


Brand New Bushnell trophy Xtreme binocs 12x50 $140 by wrchinook
[Yesterday at 11:15:43 PM]


Remington 770 2 clips .270. $275 by wrchinook
[Yesterday at 11:04:53 PM]


1" vs 30mm scope tubes by Oh Mah
[Yesterday at 10:56:46 PM]


My rifle is having a weird accuracy problem by jb101
[Yesterday at 10:56:18 PM]


Garmin delta upland Xc vs Dogtra 2702t&b by GoBeavs85
[Yesterday at 10:35:48 PM]


Abandoned game cams by bearpaw
[Yesterday at 10:34:16 PM]


Moose Rut by grundy53
[Yesterday at 10:24:33 PM]