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Author Topic: Wild Food (not exactly Wild Game)  (Read 610 times)

Offline merkaba93

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Wild Food (not exactly Wild Game)
« on: December 06, 2018, 11:37:01 PM »
Love hunting for mushrooms and cooking them!

Matsutake and pheasant tom yum soup. Lacto fermented bok choy (from the garden). Grilled matsutake and homemade soy sauce.

Herbed duck fat sautéed chanterelles over cheddar grits.

Bears head "crab" cakes with lemon aioli.

Chanterelle, prosciutto and gruyere béchamel hand pie.


Mushroom hunting is such a gateway for people to start getting outside and harvesting their own food. And possibly viewing wild things as a food source. Maybe we, as hunters should take someone mushroom hunting. Plant a seed.

I'm know my way around spring morel hunting. But when it comes to fall chanterelles, lobsters, boletes, and matsutake I didn't know all that much. But luckily I found a friend who puts on mushroom hunting classes. She is amazing! She knows way more about mushrooms than I know about food. If anyone is interested in learning more and possibly being able to find their own edibles (without the fear of being poisoned) you should take a class! If you want, I can point you in the right direction.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2018, 11:50:08 PM by merkaba93 »
Be Better than Cream of Mushroom Soup

Offline pianoman9701

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Re: Wild Food (not exactly Wild Game)
« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2018, 05:58:57 AM »
I forage many varieties of mushrooms. But, don't miss out on wild greens. Stinging nettle has medicinal qualities as well as being a great potherb. wild violets, miner's lettuce, lemon balm, wood sorrel, watercress, cattail shoots and the green tops (tastes like corn), wood violets, mustard flowers and greens, young dandelion greens, chickweed, ginger and licorice root, young spruce tips (-1"), juniper berries, are all wonderful edibles that can be foraged for several months of the year.
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Online Chase2008

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Re: Wild Food (not exactly Wild Game)
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2018, 09:51:58 PM »
Interested in getting some info / class about foraging.  Anything around Arlington that you know of?

Offline merkaba93

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Re: Wild Food (not exactly Wild Game)
« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2018, 12:42:28 AM »
https://wildcraftstudioschool.com
Her name is Rachel Zoller, puts on a classes for Wildcraft and a few other organizations, like Clark College, City of Westlinn, Mt Adams Institute.
www.yellowelanor.com
For those who use Instagram search Yellowelanor
Be Better than Cream of Mushroom Soup

Offline Jake Dogfish

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Re: Wild Food (not exactly Wild Game)
« Reply #4 on: December 08, 2018, 03:57:13 PM »
That looks tasty!  :drool:
I love foraging.  So much to do in the woods.

Offline DeerThug

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Re: Wild Food (not exactly Wild Game)
« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2018, 05:24:51 PM »
Foraging is something that I would like to get into more.  Of course, I do morels etc and coral mushrooms in the fall.  I also have been picking chokecherries for jelly and syrup for several years.  This year I did elderberry syrup.  Both the chokecherry and elderberry syrups are to kill for.  I also get wild crab apples and wild walnuts.  This summer I found some wild grape plants, but the quail got most of them. And the bunches that were on the ground got moldy.  Next summer I am going to prop up the vines so they hang better.  There is a ton of food out there, just have to know how to go get it.
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Offline merkaba93

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Re: Wild Food (not exactly Wild Game)
« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2018, 09:36:15 PM »
Foraging is something that I would like to get into more.  Of course, I do morels etc and coral mushrooms in the fall.  I also have been picking chokecherries for jelly and syrup for several years.  This year I did elderberry syrup.  Both the chokecherry and elderberry syrups are to kill for.  I also get wild crab apples and wild walnuts.  This summer I found some wild grape plants, but the quail got most of them. And the bunches that were on the ground got moldy.  Next summer I am going to prop up the vines so they hang better.  There is a ton of food out there, just have to know how to go get it.

Wow that's impressive. I'd like to hear more about what you did with the syrup.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2018, 09:57:32 PM by merkaba93 »
Be Better than Cream of Mushroom Soup

Offline DeerThug

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Re: Wild Food (not exactly Wild Game)
« Reply #7 on: December 09, 2018, 08:09:02 AM »
The syrups are great on any meat.  Great on pancakes and with bacon.   The best is on vanilla ice cream!
Like I said really easy to make.
3 cups juice
6 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 teaspoon almond extract
Makes about 7 - 1/2 pint jars...
First extract the juice.  In a large saucepan put about 4 inches of clean berries and just enough water to almost cover them.  Use as little water as possible.  Heat slowly till boiling mashing with a potato masher often.  Strain to get pure juice.  Do as much as needed to get the 3 cups.  Dont do too much at a time or you will dilute the juice and cant mash very well.  The better job you do here, the better the syrup.

Then put juice in a clean saucepan and heat slowly till boiling stirring constantly.  Then add sugar and almond extract.  Stir constantly and heat slowly till rolling boil.  You can also add just a little butter or margarine to keep from foaming and boiling over - highly recommended or you will have a sticky mess to clean up

Pour syrup in jar and lid and ring - BE CAREFUL IT WILL BURN THE CRAP OUT OF YOU..

I use the hot jar method for syrup and jelly.  Wash jars then put in boiling water for a bit, using tongs set sideways on oven rack at 225.  Do this first and they will be dry and hot by the time the syrup is done.  Put rings in the oven too so they are hot.  Fill jars one at a time 1/4 inch from top, use a damp paper towel to be sure the top of jar is CLEAN. Then a dry to be sure it is dry.  then lid and ring as tight as you can. Then do the next one. Put jar on a towel to cool naturally.  Dont mess with them till they seal. Again use oven mitt or something to not get burned.  Done right and careful you will get 100% sealed every time.  A helper when putting in the jars is recommended.
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Offline merkaba93

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Re: Wild Food (not exactly Wild Game)
« Reply #8 on: December 09, 2018, 10:15:00 AM »
Foraging is something that I would like to get into more.  Of course, I do morels etc and coral mushrooms in the fall.  I also have been picking chokecherries for jelly and syrup for several years.  This year I did elderberry syrup.  Both the chokecherry and elderberry syrups are to kill for.  I also get wild crab apples and wild walnuts.  This summer I found some wild grape plants, but the quail got most of them. And the bunches that were on the ground got moldy.  Next summer I am going to prop up the vines so they hang better.  There is a ton of food out there, just have to know how to go get it.

I honestly can say I don't remember ever seeing chokecherries in the wild. Where do you find them?
Be Better than Cream of Mushroom Soup

Offline kellama2001

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Re: Wild Food (not exactly Wild Game)
« Reply #9 on: December 09, 2018, 10:35:30 PM »
Tagging...I have a high interest in foraging and hope to learn more and hope to have more time soon to implement the knowledge. Thanks for posting!
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Offline merkaba93

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Re: Wild Food (not exactly Wild Game)
« Reply #10 on: Yesterday at 12:04:53 AM »
Mushroom Risotto. Dried Morels and Fresh Chanterelle. Mixing fall and spring.
Be Better than Cream of Mushroom Soup

Offline DeerThug

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Re: Wild Food (not exactly Wild Game)
« Reply #11 on: Yesterday at 10:15:53 AM »
Well I am only familiar with around Yakima for chokecherries.  There are quite a few in the Naches valley from Yakima to a little above the Y.  Also up the Ahtanum again to just above the Y.  There are a lot along the road right of ways.  They are ready to pick by Labor day most years.  Usually need a ladder to get most of them.
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