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Author Topic: the Methow is even worse off than I thought  (Read 26038 times)

Offline Deerelk37

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Re: the Methow is even worse off than I thought
« Reply #270 on: May 10, 2019, 10:41:43 AM »
The good ol’ days for us younger generations...is now. Years from now when there are 5000 deer I the valley we will be wishing for the 10-15K that is around now. Hunt predators and protect public land  :)

Has ther ever been an idea to make a group of hunters dedicated to predator control? Not an agency, but a pool of hunters who want to help thin predators. Maybe target certain units and hit them hard for months or years?

Offline huntnphool

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Re: the Methow is even worse off than I thought
« Reply #271 on: May 10, 2019, 11:04:34 AM »
In the old days, WDFW catered to hunters that wanted fewer predators and more deer.  Now, WDFW caters to the 96% of Washingtonians that don't hunt and generally like predators, and not the 4% of us that do hunt and don't like predators.
Thinking out loud, maybe they could 'cater' to the anti's by biologists deliberately fudging the numbers due to some inherent bias toward cougars, or by previous leadership deliberately directing funding away from studying cougar / mule deer issues and toward steelhead, wolves and orcas?

 Oh they funded studies alright, it's what they base their ridiculous plans on.

http://www.cbbulletin.com/423008.aspx

 And about Mr Wielgus...

https://hunting-washington.com/smf/index.php/topic,200702.msg2664077.html#msg2664077

I read the first sentence and my brain exploded "Overharvest of cougars can increase negative encounters between the predator and humans, livestock and game, according to a 13-year Washington State University research project. "

It seems pretty hard to justify that reducing cougar populations makes the remaining cougars more likely to negatively interact with humans, livestock and game.  What seems more rational is that when you reduce cougar numbers, we'll have more game, livestock and humans and less cougars to 'negatively encounter'.  In fact wouldn't the remaining cougars be less likely to need to interact with humans or livestock since game is more plentiful?

Any plan based on the first assertion would be forced to reduce game numbers to decrease negative interactions.

Am I just reading this wrong??

  Nope, you read it exactly right. To reduce human interaction we need to have more cougars! ;)
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Offline JimmyHoffa

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Re: the Methow is even worse off than I thought
« Reply #272 on: May 10, 2019, 07:39:08 PM »

How does that make sense?  How can they 'cater' to anyone who doesn't use their services?  Maybe I'm mis-reading your concluding point, the main points you made above this last paragraph were spot on. 

They are responsible for wildlife and the things that wildlife do.  When there are too many complaints about animals and damage, WDFW has had to pay for it.  WDFW has eliminated elk in certain areas to keep people from calling about golf course damage or tearing up farms.

Offline SuperX

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Re: the Methow is even worse off than I thought
« Reply #273 on: May 10, 2019, 08:11:25 PM »

How does that make sense?  How can they 'cater' to anyone who doesn't use their services?  Maybe I'm mis-reading your concluding point, the main points you made above this last paragraph were spot on. 

They are responsible for wildlife and the things that wildlife do.  When there are too many complaints about animals and damage, WDFW has had to pay for it.  WDFW has eliminated elk in certain areas to keep people from calling about golf course damage or tearing up farms.
yeah I get that, not the case here though.

Offline wolfbait

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Re: the Methow is even worse off than I thought
« Reply #274 on: May 11, 2019, 06:25:49 AM »

How does that make sense?  How can they 'cater' to anyone who doesn't use their services?  Maybe I'm mis-reading your concluding point, the main points you made above this last paragraph were spot on. 

They are responsible for wildlife and the things that wildlife do.  When there are too many complaints about animals and damage, WDFW has had to pay for it.  WDFW has eliminated elk in certain areas to keep people from calling about golf course damage or tearing up farms.


Doesn't seem to apply for wolf predation...

Offline Gobble Doc

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Re: the Methow is even worse off than I thought
« Reply #275 on: May 13, 2019, 09:23:24 AM »
https://www.seattlepi.com/lifestyle/travel/article/Methow-Valley-getaway-Winthrop-Twisp-Mazama-Wash-13665082.php

Where to plan your next getaway: Exploring the Methow Valley
By Genna Martin, SeattlePI Updated 6:00 am PDT, Monday, March 11, 2019

Washington state is blessed with opportunities for beautiful weekend getaways of all kinds. Mountains, kayaks, islands and more await those who are ready to jaunt beyond the Seattle area to find a vacation surrounded by natural splendor.

But if the islands have gotten a little too commercial for you, or if you need a break from the unceasing gray of Seattle winter, maybe it's time to head towards the Methow Valley.

Nestled just east of the North Cascades and extending from Pateros to Mazama, the Methow Valley is home to the largest network of cross-country skiing trails in North America, with 120 miles of groomed trails to choose from.

There's also more typical Washington tourism fare: fabulous landscapes year-round, small town comforts and artisan shopping.

The latter is a lot of what you'll find in Twisp. One resident described the difference between nearby Winthop and Twisp as "they've got the trails, we've got the art." Sitting at the union of the Twisp and Methow rivers, this small town has a strong sense of community and a swath of art galleries.

The best known of these galleries, the 30-year-old non-profit Confluence Gallery and Art Center, displays regular six-week art shows featuring both local and non-local artists. A new show with animal themed art opened Saturday and prominently displayed a large, bionic-looking metal work black widow spider created by Okanogan High School art teacher Dan Brown.

"The raddest part of this place is that we are just a bunch of weirdos who want to make art," said Confluence manager Rose Weagant.

A block down the street is the Glover Street Market, one of many organic, fresh and local, upscale groceries in the Valley. Glover Street remains unique and quirky with a colorful produce section watched over by plastic Godzilla dolls, a local food cafe, smoothie and juice bar and downstairs, a cozy wine cellar that offers wine and olive oil tastings from around the world. The knowledgeable sommelier was dolling out pours of four top-notch Italian wines to the host of cellar patrons when I visited.

For another unique grocery experience, head down to Hank's Harvest Foods on the south end of town. What at first looks like a regular grocery store takes a turn as soon as you cast your eyes above the frozen food aisles and see the dozens of taxidermy animals that stare down at shoppers from their perch. The rows of big game animals include your run-of-the mill white-tailed deer, mules, elk, a bear silently growling toward the meat section, but then you notice the more exotic animals, buffalo, a hyena, a skunk, a kudu bull, various horned African antelope and lions. The pièce de résistance is a scene at the very front of the store, a full grown African lion chasing down a wild warthog, sandwiched between the check out aisle and the dry pet food display. It is all very surreal. Each animal was killed personally by store owner Hank Konrad on his many hunting trips to Africa, Canada and elsewhere. Konrad, who is a member of the conservation group Safari Club and says he only hunts on permitted lands and according to quotas, told the Methow Grist, "I ran out of room at home so I brought some of them down here for the kids to see."

About 15 minutes north of Twisp, you'll find the Old Western town of Winthrop. Though it may seem like just another theme town a la Leavenworth, Winthrop's history goes longer than that. After white settlers took the land from native tribes in the area, the town quickly grew as a spot for cattle ranching, nearby mining operations and, for a time, apple orchards.

It wouldn't be until 1905 that there would be production on a real road to Winthrop, better connecting one of the most isolated areas in the state to the rest of Washington. Because of this, the town maintained much of its Western charm, ultimately being restored in 1972.

But though the town may seem kitschy, it was always meant to be a functioning town; local historic photographs helped inspire the restoration, but the town has continued to grow for both vacation getaways and year-round homes.

Around Winthrop, you'll find a paradise for the outdoors enthusiast. Bucolic, rolling snow-covered hills lead to miles of cross-country skiing, snow shoeing and fat bike trails, an outdoor ice rink in town offers open skate hours, and you can wake up to sweeping views of the valley from the Sun Mountain Lodge. At the end of the day, enjoy a beer and burger at the cozy Old Schoolhouse Brewery.

Kurt Oakley, center, who owns Morning Glory Balloons with his wife Melinda, sits in a "hopper" and inflates his balloon as three hot air balloons are inflated in downtown Winthrop for spectators to check out during the annual Winthrop Balloon Festival, March 2, 2019. Oakley co-founded the festival 22 years ago.
The 22nd annual Winthrop Hot Air Balloon Festival took place last weekend and is a sight to be seen. The event features sunrise balloon flights over the weekend (which only went up one of three weekend days this year due to poor weather) and a Saturday night balloon glow in downtown Winthrop where the public can see the illuminated, inflated balloons up close.

Just a bit further north, on the cusp of the North Cascades, is the tiny town of Mazama, with even more opportunities for winter sports. Home to the Methow Trails, the area serves as a great place to learn or commit to cross-country skiing, with ample groomed tracks over flat and rolling farmland along the Methow River. The Methow Valley Sports Trails Association maintains the 120-plus miles of groomed, interconnected trails that are free for kids under 17. While other big-name ski areas in the country, like Aspen, Breckenridge, Stowe, Mt. Baker, can have a "bougie" resort vibe, Mazama is more down-to-earth with reasonably priced accommodations, including ski up cabins, available for rent and family friendly trails.

 Methow features one of the largest trail networks in North America.

There is also the opportunity for downhill skiing -- specifically, 300,000 acres of heli-skiing terrain, where skiers take off from Mazama in a helicopter to find fresh snow and untouched runs around the North Cascades. North Cascades Heli Ski, which is celebrating its 30th anniversary this year, offers three packages including a day of heli-skiing with seven helicopter pick ups and drop offs ($1,250 per person), a three-day ski trip that includes meals and a stay in a mountain yurt ($3,450) or you can charter a helicopter privately for your group for the day.

While you're in town, don't forget to stop by the delightful Mazama General Store. The store has been around in some form or another since the 1920s, but 12 years ago it was purchased by Missy and Rick LeDuc who remolded and turned it into the locally sourced organic market and community hub it is today. It offers a deli with fresh pastries, breads, soups, pies and pizzas in house and is a jumping off point for the miles of groomed cross-country ski trails in the area. We were told not to skip out on the morning quiche options. Missy LeDuc is the daughter of John Miller who is the third generation owner of Husky Deli in West Seattle.

Regardless of season, the Methow is a relaxed, affordable and destination for anyone who wants to get out of the city and explore some of the beautiful landscapes our state has to offer.
« Last Edit: May 13, 2019, 09:31:29 AM by Gobble Doc »

Offline SuperX

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Re: the Methow is even worse off than I thought
« Reply #276 on: May 13, 2019, 09:30:06 AM »


https://www.seattlepi.com/lifestyle/travel/article/Methow-Valley-getaway-Winthrop-Twisp-Mazama-Wash-13665082.php

Where to plan your next getaway: Exploring the Methow Valley
By Genna Martin, SeattlePI Updated 6:00 am PDT, Monday, March 11, 2019

Washington state is blessed with opportunities for beautiful weekend getaways of all kinds. Mountains, kayaks, islands and more await those who are ready to jaunt beyond the Seattle area to find a vacation surrounded by natural splendor.

But if the islands have gotten a little too commercial for you, or if you need a break from the unceasing gray of Seattle winter, maybe it's time to head towards the Methow Valley.

Nestled just east of the North Cascades and extending from Pateros to Mazama, the Methow Valley is home to the largest network of cross-country skiing trails in North America, with 120 miles of groomed trails to choose from.

There's also more typical Washington tourism fare: fabulous landscapes year-round, small town comforts and artisan shopping.

The latter is a lot of what you'll find in Twisp. One resident described the difference between nearby Winthop and Twisp as "they've got the trails, we've got the art." Sitting at the union of the Twisp and Methow rivers, this small town has a strong sense of community and a swath of art galleries.

The best known of these galleries, the 30-year-old non-profit Confluence Gallery and Art Center, displays regular six-week art shows featuring both local and non-local artists. A new show with animal themed art opened Saturday and prominently displayed a large, bionic-looking metal work black widow spider created by Okanogan High School art teacher Dan Brown.

"The raddest part of this place is that we are just a bunch of weirdos who want to make art," said Confluence manager Rose Weagant.

Dozens of taxidermied big game animals look down on shoppers at Hank's Harvest grocery store in Twisp, March 3, 2019. The animals were all killed by store owner Hank Konrad, many on trips to Africa or Canada. The animals, which include two lions, are prominently displayed in the store. 

Dozens of taxidermied big game animals look down on shoppers at Hank's Harvest grocery store in Twisp, March 3, 2019. The animals were all killed by store owner Hank Konrad, many on trips to Africa or Canada. The animals, which include two lions, are prominently displayed in the store.
A block down the street is the Glover Street Market, one of many organic, fresh and local, upscale groceries in the Valley. Glover Street remains unique and quirky with a colorful produce section watched over by plastic Godzilla dolls, a local food cafe, smoothie and juice bar and downstairs, a cozy wine cellar that offers wine and olive oil tastings from around the world. The knowledgeable sommelier was dolling out pours of four top-notch Italian wines to the host of cellar patrons when I visited.

For another unique grocery experience, head down to Hank's Harvest Foods on the south end of town. What at first looks like a regular grocery store takes a turn as soon as you cast your eyes above the frozen food aisles and see the dozens of taxidermy animals that stare down at shoppers from their perch. The rows of big game animals include your run-of-the mill white-tailed deer, mules, elk, a bear silently growling toward the meat section, but then you notice the more exotic animals, buffalo, a hyena, a skunk, a kudu bull, various horned African antelope and lions. The pièce de résistance is a scene at the very front of the store, a full grown African lion chasing down a wild warthog, sandwiched between the check out aisle and the dry pet food display.

It is all very surreal. Each animal was killed personally by store owner Hank Konrad on his many hunting trips to Africa, Canada and elsewhere. Konrad, who is a member of the conservation group Safari Club and says he only hunts on permitted lands and according to quotas, told the Methow Grist, "I ran out of room at home so I brought some of them down here for the kids to see."

About 15 minutes north of Twisp, you'll find the Old Western town of Winthrop. Though it may seem like just another theme town a la Leavenworth, Winthrop's history goes longer than that. After white settlers took the land from native tribes in the area, the town quickly grew as a spot for cattle ranching, nearby mining operations and, for a time, apple orchards.

It wouldn't be until 1905 that there would be production on a real road to Winthrop, better connecting one of the most isolated areas in the state to the rest of Washington. Because of this, the town maintained much of its Western charm, ultimately being restored in 1972.

But though the town may seem kitschy, it was always meant to be a functioning town; local historic photographs helped inspire the restoration, but the town has continued to grow for both vacation getaways and year-round homes.

Around Winthrop, you'll find a paradise for the outdoors enthusiast. Bucolic, rolling snow-covered hills lead to miles of cross-country skiing, snow shoeing and fat bike trails, an outdoor ice rink in town offers open skate hours, and you can wake up to sweeping views of the valley from the Sun Mountain Lodge. At the end of the day, enjoy a beer and burger at the cozy Old Schoolhouse Brewery.

Kurt Oakley, center, who owns Morning Glory Balloons with his wife Melinda, sits in a "hopper" and inflates his balloon as three hot air balloons are inflated in downtown Winthrop for spectators to check out during the annual Winthrop Balloon Festival, March 2, 2019. Oakley co-founded the festival 22 years ago.

Kurt Oakley, center, who owns Morning Glory Balloons with his wife Melinda, sits in a "hopper" and inflates his balloon as three hot air balloons are inflated in downtown Winthrop for spectators to check out during the annual Winthrop Balloon Festival, March 2, 2019. Oakley co-founded the festival 22 years ago.
The 22nd annual Winthrop Hot Air Balloon Festival took place last weekend and is a sight to be seen. The event features sunrise balloon flights over the weekend (which only went up one of three weekend days this year due to poor weather) and a Saturday night balloon glow in downtown Winthrop where the public can see the illuminated, inflated balloons up close.

Just a bit further north, on the cusp of the North Cascades, is the tiny town of Mazama, with even more opportunities for winter sports. Home to the Methow Trails, the area serves as a great place to learn or commit to cross-country skiing, with ample groomed tracks over flat and rolling farmland along the Methow River. The Methow Valley Sports Trails Association maintains the 120-plus miles of groomed, interconnected trails that are free for kids under 17. While other big-name ski areas in the country, like Aspen, Breckenridge, Stowe, Mt. Baker, can have a "bougie" resort vibe, Mazama is more down-to-earth with reasonably priced accommodations, including ski up cabins, available for rent and family friendly trails.

 Methow features one of the largest trail networks in North America.

There is also the opportunity for downhill skiing -- specifically, 300,000 acres of heli-skiing terrain, where skiers take off from Mazama in a helicopter to find fresh snow and untouched runs around the North Cascades. North Cascades Heli Ski, which is celebrating its 30th anniversary this year, offers three packages including a day of heli-skiing with seven helicopter pick ups and drop offs ($1,250 per person), a three-day ski trip that includes meals and a stay in a mountain yurt ($3,450) or you can charter a helicopter privately for your group for the day.

While you're in town, don't forget to stop by the delightful Mazama General Store. The store has been around in some form or another since the 1920s, but 12 years ago it was purchased by Missy and Rick LeDuc who remolded and turned it into the locally sourced organic market and community hub it is today. It offers a deli with fresh pastries, breads, soups, pies and pizzas in house and is a jumping off point for the miles of groomed cross-country ski trails in the area. We were told not to skip out on the morning quiche options. Missy LeDuc is the daughter of John Miller who is the third generation owner of Husky Deli in West Seattle.

Regardless of season, the Methow is a relaxed, affordable and destination for anyone who wants to get out of the city and explore some of the beautiful landscapes our state has to offer.

Nice piece!  Hope it brings some cash in for the locals, I'm sure they're hurting for revenue like most rural communities.  Good job by the chamber of commerce's involved.

Offline Skyvalhunter

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Re: the Methow is even worse off than I thought
« Reply #277 on: May 13, 2019, 10:13:34 AM »
So where is the part about hunting? Besides Hanks "killing", "run of the mill deer, bear, elk" which are now far and few between. But hey we have cougars, wolves which are soon to feast on your pets.

Offline jeffitz

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Re: the Methow is even worse off than I thought
« Reply #278 on: May 13, 2019, 12:02:29 PM »
Isnt there great snowmobiling areas up there also - maybe i missed that?
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Offline kirkl

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Re: the Methow is even worse off than I thought
« Reply #279 on: May 14, 2019, 10:15:36 AM »
I commented on Winthrops facebook page about a month ago that it would be nice to come over and ride side by sides as we hunt and camp over there and was basically told by some locals (or they looked like west siders that have moved there) to F--k off and go ride somewhere else. Have been going to winthrop for probably 40 years so that was pretty nice of them.

Offline Skyvalhunter

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Re: the Methow is even worse off than I thought
« Reply #280 on: May 14, 2019, 11:14:19 AM »
Do you feel it was the hunting part or the side by side portion maybe perceived to be a West sixer. I hope you left a comment back.

Offline mountainman

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Re: the Methow is even worse off than I thought
« Reply #281 on: May 14, 2019, 03:09:19 PM »
I commented on Winthrops facebook page about a month ago that it would be nice to come over and ride side by sides as we hunt and camp over there and was basically told by some locals (or they looked like west siders that have moved there) to F--k off and go ride somewhere else. Have been going to winthrop for probably 40 years so that was pretty nice of them.

Yup, sure has changed, from the general locals to what type of tourism they want. Sad the way it has changed.
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Offline jstone

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Re: the Methow is even worse off than I thought
« Reply #282 on: May 14, 2019, 03:24:50 PM »
It could just be the few bad apples who go off road and mess up the hunting area? That’s why people have an issue with them.

Offline no.cen.wa

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Re: the Methow is even worse off than I thought
« Reply #283 on: May 15, 2019, 07:48:57 AM »
Yes, Winthrop has changed, 40 years ago when the season was 4 weeks and more you couldn't find a place to park, the bars and restaurants were full till the last day of the season, and then they said the town closed down :chuckle: of course some locals were glad but the businesses knew the season was over. But then, there were deer and it was important to keep the herd healthy,,,, it was the Department of Game :bash:

Offline timberfaller

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Re: the Methow is even worse off than I thought
« Reply #284 on: May 15, 2019, 08:11:34 AM »
"After white settlers took the land from native tribes in the area,"

I would say the writer doesn't have a clue about the history of the Valley!!!   BUT then it is written for the Seattle PI. :o
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