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Author Topic: How to hunt elk in Western WA  (Read 4868 times)

Offline Maybach Outdoors

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Re: How to hunt elk in Western WA
« Reply #15 on: September 21, 2022, 08:06:00 AM »
I got my first Roosie (and animal) this year with a bow. I started last year and was pretty determined to figure them out this year. No expert by any means. Here is what I did:

1. I picked a unit that harvests a lot of elk. If I knew there were elk in there...and those elk were killed every year... it gave me hope. I understood that hunting pressure would be a challange, but my goal was to get as many elk encounters as possible. I knew that finding elk is half the battle, but you also have to call them in or sneak up on them and finally shoot them. I simply wanted more experience with these things. And, knowing that elk were in that unit gave me a mental safety net when things got tough. I lot of people pack up and leave after the first 3 or 4 days because they don't see or hear anything.

2. I spent 10-15 weekends in the same unit. Same general area. Walking around, setting up cameras, and hitting as many areas as possible. I looked for last years' rubs and sign. If I didn't find old rubs or sign I crossed that area off my list (they might actually move into these areas during hunting season, but I assumed that they would not be there) Generally, what I found is that the elk were making 2-3 day loops through the same general area. That's how I was seeing them on camera at least.

3. I set up a nice camp. It was nice to have a comfortable and dry bed to sleep in every night. Makes hunting all day a lot more feasible. Last year I was sleeping out of my car and I only lasted 5 days. I made sure I had good and healthy food so I would have energy to hunt all day.

4. I came up with a game plan for a 9 day hunt. I was going to spend the first 4 days hitting the same spot every day (it's about a 9-10 mile loop). I was bumping elk in there all summer. My thinking was that if the elk were making a loop they simply might not be in one area on one specific day. But, I want to emphasize that I was going to hit that area no matter what on all 4 days. I feel like I moved around too much last year. The next 3 days I would hit other areas I had scouted in the summer. Covering as much ground as possible. Finally, I left the last 2 days as wildcard days in case I had come up with a better plan.

5. I came up with a game plan on how I was going to hunt the elk. For the first 4 days I was going to alternate morning, afternoon, and evening strategies (calling, still hunt, ambush, etc.). For example, I would do a lot of bugling and calling morning 1. But, I would still hunt morning 2 while bugling and calling afternoon 2. I still don't really know how to hunt these elk. My thinking was to try a systematic approach and see what sticks.

6. Be flexible. I was very surprised when my super top secret spot that had zero bootprints all summer had 9 trucks parked at the gate on opening morning. I remember telling myself "it's a marathon not a sprint" over and over as I drove away to plan B (same general area just different access point). I walked into some dark timber in hopes of intercepting elk that would be pushed... 30 minutes into my hunt I had a bull bugling and killed him after 15 minutes. 95% luck for sure, but I still have meat in the freezer.

7. Be persistent. Stick to the plan. I went back into my area 3-4 days after opening morning to pick up my cameras. No pick ups at the gate. Not a soul out there. I had 2 bulls bugling their heads off right where I thought they would be.

My plan for next year is to figure out another unit closer to home. I was driving nearly 6 hours every scouting trip, so that takes a lot out boots on the ground time. I have an general understanding now of what the elk appear to like (timber, reprod, etc.), so I will escout places that appear similar to the ones I found this summer. I'm going to repeat the same process in the new unit and then decide which one I want to hunt next year. Worst case scenario I have more intel.

Hope this helps. If you need more insight reach out to me on instagram @Hunt_phd

M

Excellent write-up, thanks for taking the time to do that! When are you going to replace that BMW by the way? ;)

lol don't expose me like that

Offline Brandon.Hunter

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Re: How to hunt elk in Western WA
« Reply #16 on: September 21, 2022, 09:41:46 AM »
One of the best write ups I have seen. Great work. :tup:

Offline ljsommer

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Re: How to hunt elk in Western WA
« Reply #17 on: September 21, 2022, 08:24:24 PM »
first of all finding elk on the wet side is easy. if you want you can shoot me a pm and we can talk on the phone.

now killing an elk is a totaly diffrent story. some guys do it based on 90% skill and 10% luck, other guys do it on 100% luck, but no one kills elk based on skill alone. just keeping the wind good for more then 5 minuets can be challenge.

Thanks for taking the time to chat with me this evening on the phone! Really appreciate how helpful folks are for us newbies!

Offline gundogr

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Re: How to hunt elk in Western WA
« Reply #18 on: September 22, 2022, 09:16:34 AM »
It’s always a challenge that’s what makes it great , there’s a YouTube podcast with Brian cal and angry spike production ( Shannon Moab) that’s pretty useful
You are on YOUTUBE?! Old man?  :hello:

Offline Griiz

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Re: How to hunt elk in Western WA
« Reply #19 on: September 22, 2022, 11:07:07 AM »
I realize my reply is more of a general advice I guess as the original post is asking for specific tactics... I'm all ears on that topic myself lol

You're reply was awesome. Having an organized strategy/plan takes a lot of the luck out of it and leads to consistent success while hunting a lot of species. I think you deserve more than 5% credit for your success. I'd turn your % around. Thanks
« Last Edit: September 22, 2022, 12:20:11 PM by Griiz »

Offline KP-Skagit

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Re: How to hunt elk in Western WA
« Reply #20 on: September 22, 2022, 11:15:38 AM »
 :yeah:

All big game hunting, particularly elk hunting came be downplayed as luck but I don't at all agree. Sure, if you have never been in a unit before and walk in the first day and get your animal... That's pretty lucky. However, if you have taken the time, be it in off season scouting, or multiple years hunting a unit, to learn where you are hunting and how the animals use the area I would say that there was no luck at all.

Offline crazywednesday

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Re: How to hunt elk in Western WA
« Reply #21 on: September 22, 2022, 12:54:16 PM »
I got my first Roosie (and animal) this year with a bow. I started last year and was pretty determined to figure them out this year. No expert by any means. Here is what I did:

1. I picked a unit that harvests a lot of elk. If I knew there were elk in there...and those elk were killed every year... it gave me hope. I understood that hunting pressure would be a challange, but my goal was to get as many elk encounters as possible. I knew that finding elk is half the battle, but you also have to call them in or sneak up on them and finally shoot them. I simply wanted more experience with these things. And, knowing that elk were in that unit gave me a mental safety net when things got tough. I lot of people pack up and leave after the first 3 or 4 days because they don't see or hear anything.

2. I spent 10-15 weekends in the same unit. Same general area. Walking around, setting up cameras, and hitting as many areas as possible. I looked for last years' rubs and sign. If I didn't find old rubs or sign I crossed that area off my list (they might actually move into these areas during hunting season, but I assumed that they would not be there) Generally, what I found is that the elk were making 2-3 day loops through the same general area. That's how I was seeing them on camera at least.

3. I set up a nice camp. It was nice to have a comfortable and dry bed to sleep in every night. Makes hunting all day a lot more feasible. Last year I was sleeping out of my car and I only lasted 5 days. I made sure I had good and healthy food so I would have energy to hunt all day.

4. I came up with a game plan for a 9 day hunt. I was going to spend the first 4 days hitting the same spot every day (it's about a 9-10 mile loop). I was bumping elk in there all summer. My thinking was that if the elk were making a loop they simply might not be in one area on one specific day. But, I want to emphasize that I was going to hit that area no matter what on all 4 days. I feel like I moved around too much last year. The next 3 days I would hit other areas I had scouted in the summer. Covering as much ground as possible. Finally, I left the last 2 days as wildcard days in case I had come up with a better plan.

5. I came up with a game plan on how I was going to hunt the elk. For the first 4 days I was going to alternate morning, afternoon, and evening strategies (calling, still hunt, ambush, etc.). For example, I would do a lot of bugling and calling morning 1. But, I would still hunt morning 2 while bugling and calling afternoon 2. I still don't really know how to hunt these elk. My thinking was to try a systematic approach and see what sticks.

6. Be flexible. I was very surprised when my super top secret spot that had zero bootprints all summer had 9 trucks parked at the gate on opening morning. I remember telling myself "it's a marathon not a sprint" over and over as I drove away to plan B (same general area just different access point). I walked into some dark timber in hopes of intercepting elk that would be pushed... 30 minutes into my hunt I had a bull bugling and killed him after 15 minutes. 95% luck for sure, but I still have meat in the freezer.

7. Be persistent. Stick to the plan. I went back into my area 3-4 days after opening morning to pick up my cameras. No pick ups at the gate. Not a soul out there. I had 2 bulls bugling their heads off right where I thought they would be.

My plan for next year is to figure out another unit closer to home. I was driving nearly 6 hours every scouting trip, so that takes a lot out boots on the ground time. I have an general understanding now of what the elk appear to like (timber, reprod, etc.), so I will escout places that appear similar to the ones I found this summer. I'm going to repeat the same process in the new unit and then decide which one I want to hunt next year. Worst case scenario I have more intel.

Hope this helps. If you need more insight reach out to me on instagram @Hunt_phd

M

This is excellent advise. The only thing I would add is that knowledge of the area your hunting is key. Where the elk feed, hide, and retreat from the heat are important. Western Wa elk feed in the morning (unusually clear cuts, but not always), water after they feed, bed mid day (brush, bottom or timber), feed in the afternoon, sleep in the open (mostly). We find that they hide in the bottoms under pressure. What does the drainage look like? How hard are you willing to hunt. Out of 3 of us this year, we killed two bulls early archery season. One was luck. We almost had a trifecta multiple times. Learn the area you want to hunt from top to bottom. Learn which ridges are easiest to get to the bottom. Hunt the same areas year in and out. We have been hunting the same unit for 17 years and we still discovered some new stuff this year. Get to know the old grades and ridgelines that elk use. Learn to call. Bugling is stupid easy. If you need a place to start, use the elk nut app. You dont have to be a great caller when you find a bull that wants to play. BTW, this is archery elk early season advice. Best of luck to you. If you get a bull down post a picture.
Justin

Offline JeffRaines

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Re: How to hunt elk in Western WA
« Reply #22 on: October 01, 2022, 09:16:09 PM »
2. I spent 10-15 weekends in the same unit. Same general area. Walking around, setting up cameras, and hitting as many areas as possible. I looked for last years' rubs and sign. If I didn't find old rubs or sign I crossed that area off my list (they might actually move into these areas during hunting season, but I assumed that they would not be there) Generally, what I found is that the elk were making 2-3 day loops through the same general area. That's how I was seeing them on camera at least.

If you don't mind my asking - how did you pick these areas? Escouting? Advice from others?

It seems like most podcast/article/tutorial/videos are centered around hunting in Montana/Colorado/Wyoming, which are pretty different terrain-wise in comparison to Western Washington. Is there some informational article/video I've overlooked when it comes to e-scouting Western Washington?

Online JimmyHoffa

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Re: How to hunt elk in Western WA
« Reply #23 on: October 02, 2022, 07:00:02 AM »
:yeah:

All big game hunting, particularly elk hunting came be downplayed as luck but I don't at all agree. Sure, if you have never been in a unit before and walk in the first day and get your animal... That's pretty lucky. However, if you have taken the time, be it in off season scouting, or multiple years hunting a unit, to learn where you are hunting and how the animals use the area I would say that there was no luck at all.
For Western WA, I would say a part of the luck factor is how other people/events play into the hunt--things outside of what you list for reducing dependence on good luck.  I would put it in the camp of bad luck. 
Here's a few examples--
Area you have been watching a bull for a month and a half, then a rainstorm a few days before the season washes out the road prompting DNR to close the road.
A place you've been watching a herd all summer and the beginning of fall--then when the season opens, a survey crew from the national park service is stomping all over the area and nailing signs in trees.
Tree farms go pay-to-play and the night before opening day you get an additional dozen hunters camping at the gate you want to go in, and all of them head in while still dark.
Area gets shuts down due to an escaped convict.
Etc.

Never ceases to amaze me how many major factors come into play right before/during the season that can't be scouted out.

Online blackveltbowhunter

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Re: How to hunt elk in Western WA
« Reply #24 on: October 02, 2022, 12:38:04 PM »
2. I spent 10-15 weekends in the same unit. Same general area. Walking around, setting up cameras, and hitting as many areas as possible. I looked for last years' rubs and sign. If I didn't find old rubs or sign I crossed that area off my list (they might actually move into these areas during hunting season, but I assumed that they would not be there) Generally, what I found is that the elk were making 2-3 day loops through the same general area. That's how I was seeing them on camera at least.

If you don't mind my asking - how did you pick these areas? Escouting? Advice from others?

It seems like most podcast/article/tutorial/videos are centered around hunting in Montana/Colorado/Wyoming, which are pretty different terrain-wise in comparison to Western Washington. Is there some informational article/video I've overlooked when it comes to e-scouting Western Washington?

  Elk are elk. And behavior is basically the same across species, with some subtle changes. Rosies in my experience are far more territorial. I will hunt an area loaded with rubs even if i dont hear bugles, double down if i know there is cows around. Rosie Bulls dont seem to waste alot of time "foreplay " bugling. The back and forth thing. If they are bugling they are seeking for cows, or ready to fight cuz another bull crossed the threshhold. I think maybe thats why they get the rap for not being vocal. They dont pop off to just say "hey im over here" much. Rockies will do that for hours. hence the hearing a hundred bugles but the bull wont budge. Thats normal for those guys. They also seem to wander alot, and rubs on a ridge often doesnt mean much as that bull might be miles away.

As for e scouting alot of factors can come into play.  Generally speaking, i have found escouting to not be nearly as beneficial in westside as out of state or eastside. That could be why there is little info out there regarding it.  Westside especially private timber is in costant change, and is not nearly as stable as state or federal land especially land not used for forest production. Roads on onyx may be closed, permanently, or for active timber operations. Pay  close attention to timelines of images on mapping software and GE as they may not accurately represent current landscape due to logging or reforestaion. Even if you have a well laid plan,  odds of your plan being blown up due to fire closure, logging etc.... are much higher. Thats before you start to factor in hunting pressure. Dont be afraid to hunt right next to an active road. Thats often where they go to escape pressure. If you find fresh and old sign mixed together, hang on to that spot and start narrowing down other factors to have A,B,C,D etc plan.

Offline Maybach Outdoors

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Re: How to hunt elk in Western WA
« Reply #25 on: October 02, 2022, 06:18:52 PM »
2. I spent 10-15 weekends in the same unit. Same general area. Walking around, setting up cameras, and hitting as many areas as possible. I looked for last years' rubs and sign. If I didn't find old rubs or sign I crossed that area off my list (they might actually move into these areas during hunting season, but I assumed that they would not be there) Generally, what I found is that the elk were making 2-3 day loops through the same general area. That's how I was seeing them on camera at least.

If you don't mind my asking - how did you pick these areas? Escouting? Advice from others?

It seems like most podcast/article/tutorial/videos are centered around hunting in Montana/Colorado/Wyoming, which are pretty different terrain-wise in comparison to Western Washington. Is there some informational article/video I've overlooked when it comes to e-scouting Western Washington?

As I mentioned in the previous reply, I first picked a unit with tons of elk in it (from harvest reports). From the escouting I typically look at dark timber pockets on the fringes of some clear cuts and reprod. You can sort of tell from the satellite images what the area looks like. I look at little access points and roads especially roads that are abandoned.. But in my opinion you cant escout western WA all that well because of some of the access issues people have mentioned. You gotta get in there and see what the roads and access points look like. I had a “perfect” spot I found that required a ton of walking to get to, but later found out the timber company left a road open for access… some roads are totally overgrown (I like those). Biggest thing I look for now is dark timber with flat spots that don’t have a trail going to them. Hopes this helps.

M

Offline sightsee

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Re: How to hunt elk in Western WA
« Reply #26 on: October 09, 2022, 10:39:25 AM »
You sound pretty serious and that's important, attitude and work ethic will be essential to becoming a competent Rosy elk hunter. They don't get the credit they deserve as being one of the toughest animals to hunt successfully consistently. It's as tough as any goat or sheep hunt out there if you go hard.
I've been traditional archery hunting them for 30 years, pickup hundreds of their sheds and hundreds of game cam pics.
You sound like you got the fundamentals of archery elk hunting fairly understood so I'll share some people that you haven't mentioned yet like Scott Haugen articles (Google them), Bowsite has had some good Rosy posts, Joel Turner at ShotIQ is an excellent elk caller, killer, shooter. Watch him on Youtube, podcasts. TradQuest podcast has had some stud Rosy hunters on their show.
These should keep you busy and enhance your savviness as a competent Roosevelt elk hunter substantially.
Self imposed limitations epitomize the maturity and character of an outdoorsman.
Study, Scout, Shoot, Train, Tag Out.

Offline sightsee

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Re: How to hunt elk in Western WA
« Reply #27 on: October 09, 2022, 10:44:45 AM »
Putting the pieces of the puzzle together when I find one of these.
Self imposed limitations epitomize the maturity and character of an outdoorsman.
Study, Scout, Shoot, Train, Tag Out.

Offline sterlryu

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Re: How to hunt elk in Western WA
« Reply #28 on: October 24, 2022, 11:17:06 AM »
I got my first Roosie (and animal) this year with a bow. I started last year and was pretty determined to figure them out this year. No expert by any means. Here is what I did:

1. I picked a unit that harvests a lot of elk. If I knew there were elk in there...and those elk were killed every year... it gave me hope. I understood that hunting pressure would be a challange, but my goal was to get as many elk encounters as possible. I knew that finding elk is half the battle, but you also have to call them in or sneak up on them and finally shoot them. I simply wanted more experience with these things. And, knowing that elk were in that unit gave me a mental safety net when things got tough. I lot of people pack up and leave after the first 3 or 4 days because they don't see or hear anything.

2. I spent 10-15 weekends in the same unit. Same general area. Walking around, setting up cameras, and hitting as many areas as possible. I looked for last years' rubs and sign. If I didn't find old rubs or sign I crossed that area off my list (they might actually move into these areas during hunting season, but I assumed that they would not be there) Generally, what I found is that the elk were making 2-3 day loops through the same general area. That's how I was seeing them on camera at least.

3. I set up a nice camp. It was nice to have a comfortable and dry bed to sleep in every night. Makes hunting all day a lot more feasible. Last year I was sleeping out of my car and I only lasted 5 days. I made sure I had good and healthy food so I would have energy to hunt all day.

4. I came up with a game plan for a 9 day hunt. I was going to spend the first 4 days hitting the same spot every day (it's about a 9-10 mile loop). I was bumping elk in there all summer. My thinking was that if the elk were making a loop they simply might not be in one area on one specific day. But, I want to emphasize that I was going to hit that area no matter what on all 4 days. I feel like I moved around too much last year. The next 3 days I would hit other areas I had scouted in the summer. Covering as much ground as possible. Finally, I left the last 2 days as wildcard days in case I had come up with a better plan.

5. I came up with a game plan on how I was going to hunt the elk. For the first 4 days I was going to alternate morning, afternoon, and evening strategies (calling, still hunt, ambush, etc.). For example, I would do a lot of bugling and calling morning 1. But, I would still hunt morning 2 while bugling and calling afternoon 2. I still don't really know how to hunt these elk. My thinking was to try a systematic approach and see what sticks.

6. Be flexible. I was very surprised when my super top secret spot that had zero bootprints all summer had 9 trucks parked at the gate on opening morning. I remember telling myself "it's a marathon not a sprint" over and over as I drove away to plan B (same general area just different access point). I walked into some dark timber in hopes of intercepting elk that would be pushed... 30 minutes into my hunt I had a bull bugling and killed him after 15 minutes. 95% luck for sure, but I still have meat in the freezer.

7. Be persistent. Stick to the plan. I went back into my area 3-4 days after opening morning to pick up my cameras. No pick ups at the gate. Not a soul out there. I had 2 bulls bugling their heads off right where I thought they would be.

My plan for next year is to figure out another unit closer to home. I was driving nearly 6 hours every scouting trip, so that takes a lot out boots on the ground time. I have an general understanding now of what the elk appear to like (timber, reprod, etc.), so I will escout places that appear similar to the ones I found this summer. I'm going to repeat the same process in the new unit and then decide which one I want to hunt next year. Worst case scenario I have more intel.

Hope this helps. If you need more insight reach out to me on instagram @Hunt_phd

M

Excellent write-up, thanks for taking the time to do that! When are you going to replace that BMW by the way? ;)

lol don't expose me like that

Congrats on the elk! Great write up. I think we went scouting together once.

Offline Badsmerf

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Re: How to hunt elk in Western WA
« Reply #29 on: November 07, 2022, 04:46:03 PM »
Question for you guys that have been doing it longer than me. Do most most people get them in clear cuts or timber? Someone told me this weekend that far more elk come out of creek bottoms/timber than clear cuts. I guess I'm trying to wrap my head around how someone would hunt these? Just know where they're going to be and wait? Still hunt random pieces next to clear cuts you'd expect them to feed in?

 


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