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Author Topic: Consuming Beaver Meat  (Read 5399 times)

Offline -Trap_addicT-

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Consuming Beaver Meat
« on: November 05, 2015, 03:29:59 PM »
I remember seeing several posts on this topic last year, so I read back through a few of them. The one thing I can't find is if there were any recommendations or "rules" on what time of year beaver meat should be consumed (by people, obviously). I really want to eat one, but it's not worth getting sick over. Is it too early right now? The fur obviously looked full and as prime as ever. It appears to be healthy, good dark meat. It's right at 50 pounds, it's a male and it had a lot of fat on it. What do you guys think, am I safe to eat this thing?

We let two little beavers go, but we are up to four beavers and pulled very nice otter last night. I'm so happy that trapping season is here, love it. Anyone else having any luck?
The mountains are calling, I must go.

Offline MADMAX

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Re: Consuming Beaver Meat
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2015, 03:52:40 PM »
duuuuoh  :yeah:
Keep the wind in your hair, and the sun at your back.


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Offline ouchfoss

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Re: Consuming Beaver Meat
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2015, 04:34:28 PM »
I don't think theres a bad time of year to eat them. I've eaten a couple around November as well as some in the spring and they taste of the same.
I've done a couple that were baked with veggies and spices and it wasnt bad but I think frying them in small steaks with flour, pepper and seasoning salt is probably my favorite way to cook them. Preparing the meat is the real important part that can make or break how good they are. Make sure you remove the castor gland without popping it. (If you do pop it, then consider that beaver bobcat bait. It ruins it, trust me!) Then soak your meat chunks in cold salty water for part of a day. Drain the bloody water and soak again for maybe another day if you want and then cook it how you want.
Seems like they are similar to most wild game being that the fat is not the best flavor so cut as much off as you can.
If you get muskrat, cook them the same way. Very delicious!

Offline -Trap_addicT-

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Re: Consuming Beaver Meat
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2015, 04:50:42 PM »
 Thank you for the reply full of information Ouchfoss. I'm going to give it a try. Is there a certain cut of meat you would recommend? Backstrap, hindquarters… Etc.?
The mountains are calling, I must go.

Offline KFhunter

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Re: Consuming Beaver Meat
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2015, 04:56:55 PM »
I'm gonna try pulled beaver sandwiches

Offline RadSav

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Re: Consuming Beaver Meat
« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2015, 05:07:02 PM »
There used to be a restaurant in Woodinville called Newman's Wildgame.  Beaver Tail was by far the best dish he served.  Only thing that came even close was the alligator and blackbuck antelope.

He asked, Do you ever give a short simple answer?  I replied, "Nope."

Offline ouchfoss

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Re: Consuming Beaver Meat
« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2015, 05:40:13 PM »
Thank you for the reply full of information Ouchfoss. I'm going to give it a try. Is there a certain cut of meat you would recommend? Backstrap, hindquarters… Etc.?
Whenever I decide to keep a beaver for food, I bone out both hind quarters, take the backstraps and cut off front shoulders. I toss the rest of beaver into my bait pile. Those three chunks all taste good and are quick and easy to cut off. Backstraps probably the best though. You cut them into nice little rounds about half inch thick and fry.  :tup:

Offline Badhabit

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Re: Consuming Beaver Meat
« Reply #7 on: November 05, 2015, 05:51:14 PM »
If I recall the old L.L. Bean Wildgame Cookbook had recipes for Beaver, Muskrat, Possum and maybe those darned no good tree climbers covered with spikes!

Offline JJB11B

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Re: Consuming Beaver Meat
« Reply #8 on: November 05, 2015, 05:52:41 PM »
I'd be interested to try that, not something I have ever had the opportunity to try.
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Offline Machias

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Re: Consuming Beaver Meat
« Reply #9 on: November 05, 2015, 06:15:53 PM »
Use two different knives, one to remove the castor sacs and the one you cut up your meat. 
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Offline winslow

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Re: Consuming Beaver Meat
« Reply #10 on: November 05, 2015, 06:22:56 PM »
For me, beaver is one of the easiest meats to enjoy - no special treatment needed. I've eaten them in every season, never haven't enjoyed the meat.

Pressure cooker beaver stew is amazing. I tend to fry up the backstraps and eat them immediately, then bone out the hind quarters and shoulders. I save the stringier stuff for grinding just like any other beast.

The younger ones (25lbs or less) have been the tenderest, just like anything else, but I've had no issue with the big ones in the pressure cooker or slow cooker. Pressure cooker has been the best and easiest results for us, though.

Offline -Trap_addicT-

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Re: Consuming Beaver Meat
« Reply #11 on: November 05, 2015, 06:57:59 PM »
 I just pressure canned a bunch of venison and have been looking for something to pressure cook! That does sound good.  If it turns out good, I could pressure can a bunch and give it out as Christmas gifts. Most of my family would probably be a little hesitant trying beaver lol

 Two different knives did not crossed my mind, that's why asked the professionals.

 I'd like to  Cook up some muskrat and beaver at the same time, using the same method. It would be a great way to compare. Thank you for all the suggestions, I will let you all know how it goes. 
The mountains are calling, I must go.

Offline WAPatriot

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Re: Consuming Beaver Meat
« Reply #12 on: November 05, 2015, 07:07:18 PM »
I just finished off the last of last years beaver. I grind it all up and make tacos or chili or the best is spicy up the meat and keep it juicy cook it for a little bit in the oven in a 9 by 13 pan then add cornbread dough to the top and eat it once the cornbread is cooked. Awesome!!  Muskrat is good too but a little gamey and its bone structure is really weird to get meat out.

 


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