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Author Topic: Olympic Peninsula Hunting Strategies  (Read 2102 times)

Offline fishngamereaper

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Re: Olympic Peninsula Hunting Strategies
« Reply #15 on: September 18, 2020, 08:46:58 PM »
Wadda you mean rain gear and comfortable camp..it doesn't rain out here :chuckle:

Offline JimmyHoffa

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Re: Olympic Peninsula Hunting Strategies
« Reply #16 on: September 18, 2020, 09:05:51 PM »

In the past when you jumped a herd they often would not go far before they stopped. things have changed in the last 20 years and elk go farther when jumped so I would say jumping them late in the day is tough but it gives you an idea where to go the next day.

It seems like 20 years ago there were many more hunters during rifle season.  The elk would have been running from one group to the other.  So maybe they knew to not run as far?  But seems there were fewer hunters in the other seasons.  Possibly by adding in the early muzzy units to some of the units, the elk have that constant pressure from fewer hunters and run more?
It sure seems like elk behavior has changed to me.  (example for 615)  After archery, one could scout the end of september and all of october--only seeing a few people.  When modern would open, you didn't have to walk far down a road to pick up sign and start walking tracks.  They left tracks and rubs all over.  After the inclusion of early muzzy a few years back, the elk didn't seem to be as close in, leave as much sign or stop during their run as before.  Like they got on high alert during bow, didn't get to calm down in October because of muzzy elk and other groups (there are lots of people going specifically for deer there now)--so they are still super flighty by the time modern opens.  A number of camps noticed the same. 

Offline pd

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Re: Olympic Peninsula Hunting Strategies
« Reply #17 on: September 18, 2020, 09:06:04 PM »
@fishngamereaper

I know that road.  It is called Chocolate Milkshake.

Si vis pacem, para bellum

Offline fishngamereaper

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Re: Olympic Peninsula Hunting Strategies
« Reply #18 on: September 18, 2020, 09:18:19 PM »
@fishngamereaper

I know that road.  It is called Chocolate Milkshake.

That road is now completely rutted up...the elk, not so much rutted up. Yet. Awful quite up hear.

Offline opdinkslayer

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Re: Olympic Peninsula Hunting Strategies
« Reply #19 on: September 18, 2020, 09:31:56 PM »
Thatís a vicious rumor that it rains on the OP! :chuckle:

Offline np205

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Re: Olympic Peninsula Hunting Strategies
« Reply #20 on: September 18, 2020, 10:23:42 PM »
It never rains out this way....
It pours

Offline Humptulips

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Re: Olympic Peninsula Hunting Strategies
« Reply #21 on: September 19, 2020, 03:46:37 AM »

In the past when you jumped a herd they often would not go far before they stopped. things have changed in the last 20 years and elk go farther when jumped so I would say jumping them late in the day is tough but it gives you an idea where to go the next day.

It seems like 20 years ago there were many more hunters during rifle season.  The elk would have been running from one group to the other.  So maybe they knew to not run as far?  But seems there were fewer hunters in the other seasons.  Possibly by adding in the early muzzy units to some of the units, the elk have that constant pressure from fewer hunters and run more?
It sure seems like elk behavior has changed to me.  (example for 615)  After archery, one could scout the end of september and all of october--only seeing a few people.  When modern would open, you didn't have to walk far down a road to pick up sign and start walking tracks.  They left tracks and rubs all over.  After the inclusion of early muzzy a few years back, the elk didn't seem to be as close in, leave as much sign or stop during their run as before.  Like they got on high alert during bow, didn't get to calm down in October because of muzzy elk and other groups (there are lots of people going specifically for deer there now)--so they are still super flighty by the time modern opens.  A number of camps noticed the same.

I have a different theory. Feel free to dis it if you want.
I noticed this change in elks habits as the cougar population started to max out. I believe it is the elks only defense against constant attacks by cougar. If they go a short way and stop the cougar is on them again so they just keep moving. There are less elk and deer and more cougar. A cougar is more apt to stay on them now but if they outdistance them maybe the cougar give up or find something else.
I have not noticed them being more flighty but when they are jumped they keep going and going.
I can agree the seasons are longer now with modern, ML and archery but I believe more so with predators elk are under constant pressure year around. Their only defense is to out distance their pursuers. 
Bruce Vandervort

Offline Alchase

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Re: Olympic Peninsula Hunting Strategies
« Reply #22 on: September 19, 2020, 10:30:01 AM »
Good luck on your hunt mister!  Itís been a long time since I hunted the peninsula but what I do remember vividly is the weather.  Iíve done the bivy style hunts there and after a few years of shivering away at night and waking up to wet, cold clothes and boots. I changed to more of a base style camp with a way to warm up and dry clothes/boots at night. It makes a world of difference in your mental outlook/motivation to get after emí each and every day. It stands to reason, quality rain gear top/bottom is essential. Again, good luck on your hunt sir.

 :yeah:

It is almost like hunting in a rainforest or something  :dunno:

I think many people forget this fact.  :hello:

 :chuckle:
Only 2 defining forces sacrificed themselves for you:
The American Soldier and Jesus Christ. One died for your freedom, the other for your soul.

My rock,
He trains my hands for war and my fingers for battle.
Psalm 144.1

Offline Aginor

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Re: Olympic Peninsula Hunting Strategies
« Reply #23 on: September 21, 2020, 11:59:08 AM »

In the past when you jumped a herd they often would not go far before they stopped. things have changed in the last 20 years and elk go farther when jumped so I would say jumping them late in the day is tough but it gives you an idea where to go the next day.

It seems like 20 years ago there were many more hunters during rifle season.  The elk would have been running from one group to the other.  So maybe they knew to not run as far?  But seems there were fewer hunters in the other seasons.  Possibly by adding in the early muzzy units to some of the units, the elk have that constant pressure from fewer hunters and run more?
It sure seems like elk behavior has changed to me.  (example for 615)  After archery, one could scout the end of september and all of october--only seeing a few people.  When modern would open, you didn't have to walk far down a road to pick up sign and start walking tracks.  They left tracks and rubs all over.  After the inclusion of early muzzy a few years back, the elk didn't seem to be as close in, leave as much sign or stop during their run as before.  Like they got on high alert during bow, didn't get to calm down in October because of muzzy elk and other groups (there are lots of people going specifically for deer there now)--so they are still super flighty by the time modern opens.  A number of camps noticed the same.

I have a different theory. Feel free to dis it if you want.
I noticed this change in elks habits as the cougar population started to max out. I believe it is the elks only defense against constant attacks by cougar. If they go a short way and stop the cougar is on them again so they just keep moving. There are less elk and deer and more cougar. A cougar is more apt to stay on them now but if they outdistance them maybe the cougar give up or find something else.
I have not noticed them being more flighty but when they are jumped they keep going and going.
I can agree the seasons are longer now with modern, ML and archery but I believe more so with predators elk are under constant pressure year around. Their only defense is to out distance their pursuers.
So what youíre saying is I should do my cougar hunting in 615 instead of 621? 😉

Offline JimmyHoffa

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Re: Olympic Peninsula Hunting Strategies
« Reply #24 on: September 21, 2020, 12:43:50 PM »
I do agree with hump about cougars. I think that has affected the elk year round.

621 has plenty of cats. Just depends if you feel like you're saving deer or elk.

Offline Threewolves

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Re: Olympic Peninsula Hunting Strategies
« Reply #25 on: September 23, 2020, 07:31:57 PM »
In reference to the weather, My buddy Bob says the rain drops are longer on the OP.
There are only so many sunrises left.

 


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