collapse

Advertisement


Author Topic: Scouting Glass  (Read 1342 times)

Offline LoneWolf25

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Pilgrim
  • *
  • Join Date: Jul 2021
  • Posts: 5
  • Location: Whatcom county
Scouting Glass
« on: July 08, 2021, 12:11:55 PM »
Hey Fellas, I am heading up into the high country next week to scout a pretty big basin. approx 1 to 1.5 miles across (old burn).  I just got a pair of Vortex 8x42s (I hunt west side too). Will I be able to see much looking at a mountain side 2000yards away? The FOV for the 8s are about 400ft @ 1000 yrds. Soo If I'm looking at 2000 yards away, my binos are giving me 800ft to pick apart and hopefully see a red/orange muley walking or laying down. As you might tell.. I'm newer to the east side hunting. .
I'm wanting to buy the 15x56s to use instead of buying a *censored*ty spotting scope (because you know, budget and the wife will have me by the balls..), So what do you guys say? I do have a cheap pair of bushnell 10x50s as well.  Are the 8s going to get the job done to locate deer? that is the only objective..

Thanks
The relentless find solace in Discipline

Offline mburrows

  • Non-Hunting & Covid-19 Topics
  • Trade Count: (+4)
  • Sourdough
  • *****
  • Join Date: Aug 2007
  • Posts: 1219
  • Location: Montana
  • Go Cougs!
Re: Scouting Glass
« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2021, 12:16:32 PM »
You’ll see animals out in the open but you won’t be able pick anything apart (shadows, in bushes, etc. ) and will have a tough time telling what the animal really is. Get some nice 15x’s or bigger and good tripod. Don’t settle for sub par glass whatever you decide to get

Offline Stein

  • Non-Hunting & Covid-19 Topics
  • Trade Count: (+9)
  • Old Salt
  • ******
  • Join Date: Sep 2013
  • Posts: 9507
  • Location: Arlington
Re: Scouting Glass
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2021, 12:22:38 PM »
I would agree, at 1-1.5 miles you will see deer and if you have them on a tripod you will likely tell if they are bucks or not.  Probably a bunch of that depends on your eyesight as well, mine is not good.  Lighting plays a huge part, if they are out in the sun it's no problem, if they are in the shade you will have trouble, if they are hidden, you will have a bunch of trouble.

I use 8x as my primary but also have the smaller Razor spotter for the few times I need to know more.

Offline LoneWolf25

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Pilgrim
  • *
  • Join Date: Jul 2021
  • Posts: 5
  • Location: Whatcom county
Re: Scouting Glass
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2021, 12:29:17 PM »
Thanks burrows and stein, I have a solid tripod and I still have good eyes.  Anyone looked through the Vortex Diamondback 15x56s?
The relentless find solace in Discipline

Offline ian_padron

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Scout
  • ****
  • Join Date: Jun 2015
  • Posts: 397
  • Location: Snohomish
Re: Scouting Glass
« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2021, 06:06:41 PM »
I'd take high end pair of 8s (Swaros, Meopta, Leica, etc) over cheap 15s all day everyday.

Depending on your budget, I'd look at getting some high end 12x50s for your high country work and keep your 8s for hunting timber on the West side.

I bought my first pair of really good binos when it was a stretch, but have regretted the purchase a grand total of zero times.

Offline Magnum_Willys

  • Political Topics
  • Trade Count: (+1)
  • Frontiersman
  • *****
  • Join Date: Nov 2009
  • Posts: 4767
Re: Scouting Glass
« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2021, 06:15:13 PM »
I'd take high end pair of 8s (Swaros, Meopta, Leica, etc) over cheap 15s all day everyday.

Depending on your budget, I'd look at getting some high end 12x50s for your high country work and keep your 8s for hunting timber on the West side.

I bought my first pair of really good binos when it was a stretch, but have regretted the purchase a grand total of zero times.

Really like quality 12x -especially at a mile - which is almost too close for a spotting scope which is needed in the over one mile range. 

Offline jackelope

  • Administrator
  • Trade Count: (+24)
  • Legend
  • *****
  • Join Date: Mar 2007
  • Posts: 45340
  • Location: Duvall, WA
  • Groups: jackelope
Re: Scouting Glass
« Reply #6 on: July 19, 2021, 07:55:44 PM »
I’ve got Vortex Vulture 15x56’s.  I wouldn’t buy diamondbacks. I’d rather save money for a good spotter or good 15’s. I think the Vultures are good “bang for the buck” 15’s but I don’t think they’d hold a candle to alpha glass when the rubber hits the road in lower light situations. I still like them and think they’re good for what they cost.
:fire.:

" In today's instant gratification society, more and more pressure revolves around success and the measurement of one's prowess as a hunter by inches on a score chart or field photos produced on social media. Don't fall into the trap. Hunting is-and always will be- about the hunt, the adventure, the views, and time spent with close friends and family. " Ryan Hatfield

My posts, opinions and statements do not represent those of this forum

Offline Caseyd

  • Site Sponsor
  • Washington For Wildlife
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Frontiersman
  • *****
  • Join Date: Aug 2007
  • Posts: 2629
  • Location: Washington
Re: Scouting Glass
« Reply #7 on: July 19, 2021, 08:51:22 PM »
Spotter

Offline yakimanoob

  • Non-Hunting & Covid-19 Topics
  • Trade Count: (+1)
  • Sourdough
  • *****
  • Join Date: Jun 2016
  • Posts: 1063
  • Location: Naches
Re: Scouting Glass
« Reply #8 on: July 20, 2021, 09:23:01 AM »
I bought my first pair of really good binos when it was a stretch, but have regretted the purchase a grand total of zero times.
:yeah:

Granted "really good" is relative.  I love my Leupold BX4 10x42s.


Offline yakimanoob

  • Non-Hunting & Covid-19 Topics
  • Trade Count: (+1)
  • Sourdough
  • *****
  • Join Date: Jun 2016
  • Posts: 1063
  • Location: Naches
Re: Scouting Glass
« Reply #9 on: July 20, 2021, 09:30:04 AM »
Generally speaking, if you're not sure whether you need more/better gear for your upcoming trip, then now's the time to test what you have, not to buy more gear that you may end up not needing.

That said, you mentioned locating deer being the only objective.  For this trip, that might be true, but come season you'll need to judge them from those distances as well.  I (and anyone else who's hunted the eastern Cascade high country) can tell you from experience that you'll save yourself hours if not days of walking by knowing from a distance if it's a 2 or 3 point buck.  If, like me, you've typically only got 3-4 days max to get the job done, it's easy to see how better glass can make or break the hunt. 

Most importantly, remember that there's no such thing as a bad trip to the high country :).  Have fun and good luck! 

Offline Bushcraft

  • Non-Hunting & Covid-19 Topics
  • Trade Count: (+1)
  • Longhunter
  • *****
  • Join Date: Aug 2008
  • Posts: 993
  • Location: Olympic Peninsula
  • Groups: NRA, SCI, NSSF, RMEF, RMGA, MDF, WSF, DU, HHC, WWC, WDAC
Re: Scouting Glass
« Reply #10 on: August 20, 2021, 04:15:41 PM »
People were harvesting bucks in the backcountry long before today's high quality optics became available.  Definitely keep that in mind as you are pondering your wants vs. needs.

Another aspect you want to keep in mind is Time. 
  • There are a limited number of days in the season.
  • There are a limited number of days one can take off from work and/or family.
  • There are a limited number of days where you can set up and glass effectively due to environmental conditions (rain, fog, smoke, etc.).
  • There are a limited number of hours in a day.
  • There are a limited number of hours in a day that are really productive in terms of glassing light.
  • After spending 90% of your day behind glass, there might be just a few minutes or seconds of time when you're able to finally find and judge an animal before it vanishes over a contour or moves behind some brush and beds down for several hours.
  • You can waste a ton of this precious time and energy moving closer for a better look at an area or an animal.

So, from my perspective, it really boils down to what kind of value you place on your time.

Personally, given our absurdly short life spans (and an even more absurdly shorter amount of time that we are physically capable of roaming the highcountry and packing out heavy loads), I place a very high value on my time and see no benefit whatsoever to buying/using anything besides top tier glass.

Accordingly, chalk me up as a fan of EL or SLC bino's on a steady tripod for constant all-day scanning, and a big-@ss HD Swaro spotter for nit-picking.  I l-o-v-e the 15x SLC's for scanning big country, but the 10x and 12x EL's are absolutely frickin' amazing and don't necessarily require a tripod.
Liberalism is the philosophy of Western suicide. 

Work hard. Hunt hard. Lift other hunters up.

*Proud supporter of NRA, NRA-ILA SCI, SCIF, SCI-PAC, NSSF, RMEF, RMGA, MDF, WSF, DU, WWA, HHC, WWC

Offline bracer40

  • Trade Count: (+3)
  • Sourdough
  • *****
  • Join Date: Nov 2010
  • Posts: 1350
Re: Scouting Glass
« Reply #11 on: August 20, 2021, 07:29:16 PM »
Another option is to rent. Great chance to tryout top of the line glass for a few bucks a day. Just opened this link’s page  shttps://optics4rent.com/product-category/binoculars/ and saw four different Swarovski models for $25/day.
If you decide on the large models, you might also be shopping for a tripod as well.

If you do some searching through previous posts, you’ll find a wealth of information here and in the Rokslide sections devoted to discussing optics.

You’ll likely find answers to questions you didn’t even know to ask. I know I have as I’ve been scouring the sites over the past few days learning all I can about the pros and cons of high end glass and tripods before I invest a sum considerably higher than cars I’ve bought in my younger days!😱.
Good luck!
“Just give me a comfortable couch, a dog, a good book, and a woman. Then if you can get the dog to go somewhere and read the book, I might have a little fun.”
― Groucho Marx

Offline Wanttohuntmore

  • Political Topics
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Sourdough
  • *****
  • Join Date: Jan 2009
  • Posts: 1780
Re: Scouting Glass
« Reply #12 on: September 10, 2021, 06:20:32 AM »
People were harvesting bucks in the backcountry long before today's high quality optics became available.  Definitely keep that in mind as you are pondering your wants vs. needs.

Another aspect you want to keep in mind is Time. 
  • There are a limited number of days in the season.
  • There are a limited number of days one can take off from work and/or family.
  • There are a limited number of days where you can set up and glass effectively due to environmental conditions (rain, fog, smoke, etc.).
  • There are a limited number of hours in a day.
  • There are a limited number of hours in a day that are really productive in terms of glassing light.
  • After spending 90% of your day behind glass, there might be just a few minutes or seconds of time when you're able to finally find and judge an animal before it vanishes over a contour or moves behind some brush and beds down for several hours.
  • You can waste a ton of this precious time and energy moving closer for a better look at an area or an animal.

So, from my perspective, it really boils down to what kind of value you place on your time.

Personally, given our absurdly short life spans (and an even more absurdly shorter amount of time that we are physically capable of roaming the highcountry and packing out heavy loads), I place a very high value on my time and see no benefit whatsoever to buying/using anything besides top tier glass.

Accordingly, chalk me up as a fan of EL or SLC bino's on a steady tripod for constant all-day scanning, and a big-@ss HD Swaro spotter for nit-picking.  I l-o-v-e the 15x SLC's for scanning big country, but the 10x and 12x EL's are absolutely frickin' amazing and don't necessarily require a tripod.

Spot on.   I use 8x zeiss, and a spotter for 1/2 mile and further glassing.  Quality is well worth it.   I'll use the bino with a tripod at times.

 


* Advertisement

SimplePortal 2.3.7 © 2008-2021, SimplePortal