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Author Topic: My 23 lb. Christmas dinner prime rib!  (Read 24803 times)

Offline Boss .300 winmag

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Offline Fl0und3rz

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Re: My 23 lb. Christmas dinner prime rib!
« Reply #61 on: December 30, 2019, 11:12:26 AM »
Is the rock salt different than the kosher salt

Yes, and for the purposes of the recipe, I think it contributes to drying of the crust and creating a dry even heat surrounding the roast, without dissolving excessively in any leeched moisture, making the roast less salty.  You scrape all the salt off the roast before it rests.

Offline OutHouse

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Re: My 23 lb. Christmas dinner prime rib!
« Reply #62 on: December 30, 2019, 01:57:19 PM »
Traeger style

Aspic in the upper left? People still eat that stuff???

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Re: My 23 lb. Christmas dinner prime rib!
« Reply #63 on: December 30, 2019, 07:21:51 PM »
Is the rock salt different than the kosher salt

Yes, and for the purposes of the recipe, I think it contributes to drying of the crust and creating a dry even heat surrounding the roast, without dissolving excessively in any leeched moisture, making the roast less salty.  You scrape all the salt off the roast before it rests.


Mix the kosher salt with just enough water to make it kind of pasty. I apply it to the roast about 1/2Ē thick. The more you can cover the better, but itís hard to get the salt to stay on the sides.
Here is the salt crust from a small roast we did yesterday,   225degrees till thermometer hits 125, let rest for 15.  Salt crust will lift right off, then just brush away any salt remaining on the roast sides.
Salt crust is the bomb!!!!!!!
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Offline Pnwrider

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Re: My 23 lb. Christmas dinner prime rib!
« Reply #64 on: December 30, 2019, 08:34:07 PM »
Iíve done prime rib a few different ways and donít think you can really go wrong as long as you have a good thermometer and donít over cook it. I do notice a difference between choice and prime (had them back to back to see if it was worth the roughly $10 per pound price delta). Some will advise you rub it and leave it uncovered in the refrigerator for a day. I never seem to remember. Plus, when I go overboard with the kosher salt, my gravy ends up too salty. My usual rub is just kosher salt, garlic, pepper.

I did a 12 lber last week. Pull it out a few hours beforehand to let it come up to temp. I rubbed it with a butter, garlic, thyme, oregano, pepper mixture. In the oven at 450 for 30 min, then finished at 300 until it hit 115 in the center. Let it rest for awhile (good time to finish the other sides in the oven and listen to your wife complain about not having double ovens). Thatís a good temp to feed the masses, might not be rare enough for some but you can use end slices for those that prefer medium. After you slice, use the drippings to make a gravy.

Iíve also done the reverse sear method. 250 degrees until it hits 110. Let it rest for at least 30 minutes. Then put it into a 500 degree oven for 30 minutes. This method yielded the most even pink/red color throughout the roast, but I feel the other method renders the fat down a little better and gives a better bark on the outside.

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Re: My 23 lb. Christmas dinner prime rib!
« Reply #65 on: December 30, 2019, 08:51:46 PM »
After all my research thatís pretty close to what I came up with, with some minor tweaks.  Thank you for taking the time to add that.
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Offline bornhunter

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Re: My 23 lb. Christmas dinner prime rib!
« Reply #66 on: December 30, 2019, 09:48:24 PM »
I have the meat cutter remove then tie the rib bones back on the roast. Bad idea or makes no difference? Also whats the best internal temp for medium rare? I'm doing a 14 pounder.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2019, 09:56:26 PM by bornhunter »

Offline Crunchy

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Re: My 23 lb. Christmas dinner prime rib!
« Reply #67 on: December 30, 2019, 09:54:48 PM »
I believe cooking with the bones adds flavor and probably helps the meat cook.  Also adds flavor if you plan on making gravy from the drippings.  I would have them cut off, season the meat and then tie back on.

Offline bornhunter

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Re: My 23 lb. Christmas dinner prime rib!
« Reply #68 on: December 30, 2019, 10:02:32 PM »
A local prime rib aficionado told me to wrap the roast in cheese cloth, place in a pan and keep on the bottom shelf of the fridge for 5 days before cooking. Take out and leave out for 3 to 4 hours before cooking. Tried that last year for the first time and everyone said it was the best one I have ever cooked.

Offline trophyhunt

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Re: My 23 lb. Christmas dinner prime rib!
« Reply #69 on: December 31, 2019, 06:00:02 AM »
I totally spaced out on the finish pic, it was a zoo at the house!  I had to feed 18 adults and 3 kids.  The rib would have cost 240.00 at the regular price but I'm friends w the owner so I got a good break.  I remembered to take a pic after dished everyone up, sorry.  One finish rib looks like the rest, you guys have some very good looking ribs on here!  I cook with the bone in because we love the ribs for lunch the next day.  The rock Salt doesn't seem to have any affect with our juices,  must have used half a roll of paper towels to keep the juice was running all over the place when cuttting up.  I am interested in the ageing process, how long and where do you age it at?  I pulled it off at 124 in the center which was a bit too high for my family, lots of blood rare people.  I normally pull at 115
This pick is a good example of why you need your meat to rest, I didn't know this back then and all my juices ran out.  So, let your meat rest at least for 1/2 hour.  Someone also said to knock off your salt crust before pulling your rib of the smoker or bbq, that is a good idea as well.
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Re: My 23 lb. Christmas dinner prime rib!
« Reply #70 on: December 31, 2019, 06:03:42 AM »
Do you cut off the ribs then tie them back on, or just cook it with them Trophyhunt?

Offline trophyhunt

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Re: My 23 lb. Christmas dinner prime rib!
« Reply #71 on: December 31, 2019, 06:10:06 AM »
Every rib I've bought has had the ribs cut off, then tied back on.   So that's the only way I know of, I'd stick with that.
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Offline bornhunter

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Re: My 23 lb. Christmas dinner prime rib!
« Reply #72 on: December 31, 2019, 09:23:27 AM »
 :yeah:
Every rib I've bought has had the ribs cut off, then tied back on.   So that's the only way I know of, I'd stick with that.

Offline Pnwrider

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Re: My 23 lb. Christmas dinner prime rib!
« Reply #73 on: December 31, 2019, 10:23:56 AM »
Depends on where you get your roast. I like buying prime from Costco so I can cut it, rub it, and tie it. A lot of times there is a piece of fat that runs along the bottom of the roast that I will trim off. Plus you want rub between the bones and the roast. Even when I bought it already cut and tied, I would end up having to cut string, rub, and re tie the roast.

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Re: My 23 lb. Christmas dinner prime rib!
« Reply #74 on: December 31, 2019, 10:27:41 AM »
I just picked up a 17 pound prime.  Looks like ribs are attached, so I assume I'll trim then tie.   Someone hinted to me the ribs taste good

 


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