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Author Topic: Help me understand: Permit seems pointless  (Read 1842 times)

Offline idaho guy

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Re: Help me understand: Permit seems pointless
« Reply #30 on: September 17, 2019, 03:13:05 PM »
The conversation about giving people a hard time for daring to apply for a permit that they're not intimately familiar with is a completely separate conversation.

When people say that it, it's not being said defensively like "if you don't know it, you're not allowed to hunt it." It's meant to be a helpful warning - that if you don't know an area, and you draw a permit to hunt it expecting success because it's a "special permit," you're probably going to be in for a rude awakening. Personally I wouldn't be wasting application dollars and points on something I didn't already know well. Drawing a tag without preparation is like signing up for a marathon and thinking just because you bought the shoes you're good to go.

And by the way... whoever told you that e-scouting counts as scouting for out of state hunts is incorrect. Or if you are just reaching that conclusion from seeing guys like Cam Hanes strut all over the west shooting bulls in every state he hunts... I can tell you there's a lot going on behind the scenes you aren't seeing. OnX and gohunt would like you to think it's true... but it's not. If you don't believe that, buy a tag for Idaho next year, prep for it with your computer, and then come back and let me know if it's the game rich garden of eden some guys on here would have you believe.
   

 :yeah: The e-scouting rage is one I don't get at all. I think its really helpful on google earth to check out what's over the next ridge I never quite made it too. Or trails/old roads maybe I didn't know about in places I have put boots on the ground and already know. As far as putting in for permits where I have never been I do it quite a bit. I also put in for permits that aren't famous for huge animals but have decent odds. Sometimes its better than I expected and sometimes its not. I had an elk tag this year that was pretty humbling and I didn't fill although there were great animals around. The benefit of having some knowledge of the ground and even some local connections shouldn't be underestimated. I am still glad I put in for it because I just like seeing(and getting to hunt) different country. Depending on where you're at different parts of Idaho are almost like different planets. I think if you are going to put in for an unknown unit be prepared to give it 110% and work harder than you would at home in a spot you know. I think the only thing that upsets people is taking a tag out of the pool and then not knowing anything about it-  some people wont really do it justice. I don't like taking the tag out of someone else's pocket(who put in for years and really knows it) to basically not hunt it or at least not give it a great effort. I would hunt that permit as hard as you can since you drew it. I have learned tons about a lot of Idaho drawing "unknown"areas and 90 percent of the time its paid off well. When I draw a "special permit" I don't know I am planning on working HARDER and spending more time at it then I do with an otc tag at home where I have hunted for 30 years. The benefit is usually a higher quality animal and a better hunt but not always an EASIER hunt. Some permits are a waste of time so you should research BEFORE you apply for an unkown unit. This is where you can learn a lot on the computer with harvest rates etc.           

Offline ljsommer

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Re: Help me understand: Permit seems pointless
« Reply #31 on: September 17, 2019, 03:19:30 PM »
I appreciate the response! If it makes anyone feel better, as soon as I drew this tag I started doing my homework, made a couple friendly contacts who pointed me in a beginning direction, and I've since spent many (12+) days out there and plan to spend many more. I've got elk on cams but not eyes-on. Hopefully that's next.

Offline Chesterdog

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Re: Help me understand: Permit seems pointless
« Reply #32 on: September 17, 2019, 03:53:44 PM »
I was able to get written permission to hunt a landowners property on Anderson Island about 10 years ago by calling the local fire department and asking the fire chief if he knew any locals that were pro-hunting and would allow a respectful young eagle scout to take a deer off their property.  Simple enough. 

This year I applied for, and drew a special hunt to harvest a second deer Anderson Island and foolishly hoped to do the same thing, however the landowner sold her property and the fire department trick didn't work (new staff?).  I can't get permission from anyone to save my life.  Things changed and I now have a useless permit.  I wouldn't blame WDFW for it though.  They warned me not to apply unless I had land or permission already secured.

Offline Piscatory_5

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Re: Help me understand: Permit seems pointless
« Reply #33 on: September 20, 2019, 12:01:17 AM »
The conversation about giving people a hard time for daring to apply for a permit that they're not intimately familiar with is a completely separate conversation.

When people say that it, it's not being said defensively like "if you don't know it, you're not allowed to hunt it." It's meant to be a helpful warning - that if you don't know an area, and you draw a permit to hunt it expecting success because it's a "special permit," you're probably going to be in for a rude awakening. Personally I wouldn't be wasting application dollars and points on something I didn't already know well. Drawing a tag without preparation is like signing up for a marathon and thinking just because you bought the shoes you're good to go.

And by the way... whoever told you that e-scouting counts as scouting for out of state hunts is incorrect. Or if you are just reaching that conclusion from seeing guys like Cam Hanes strut all over the west shooting bulls in every state he hunts... I can tell you there's a lot going on behind the scenes you aren't seeing. OnX and gohunt would like you to think it's true... but it's not. If you don't believe that, buy a tag for Idaho next year, prep for it with your computer, and then come back and let me know if it's the game rich garden of eden some guys on here would have you believe.

Great post thank you, that's a new perspective and I appreciate it!
Do you have a weyerhaeuser access permit? There is a lot of green diamond property as well as a few other timber companies land that you can access(some by foot only) in addition to the NF land and state land. Rayonier general permit may be something to look into as well.

 


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