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Author Topic: Claiming residence in another state  (Read 4071 times)

Offline kselkhunter

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Re: Claiming residence in another state
« Reply #45 on: January 27, 2021, 01:24:54 PM »
What do you do if you become a resident of another state in the middle of a license season?  Is there a way to turn your WA license in before you buy the new resident one in another state?

The states do communicate and will know if you're holding a resident hunting license in two states.   So as soon as you make the move to a new state, you go into your WDFW profile and switch it to non-resident status.  Unfortunately, most states have a wait period to establish residency for hunting licenses.  Oregon is 6 months.   So when I made the move back to OR from WA last year, from a department of fish and wildlife perspective I was not a resident of any state for 6 months.   OR requires changing your drivers license within 30 days of arrival, and that triggers your non-resident status in WA if a officer stops you while hunting in WA and you're holding a resident hunting license and out of state DL (I asked both WDFW and WSP).   And I couldn't buy a resident license in OR for 6 months (to the day) after my move date that I entered into ODFW profile.   So I just sherpa'd for friends last fall as I wasn't going to pay for an OR non-resident tag, and I couldn't hunt my WA resident tag or special permit anymore (not legally). 


It is what it is.  Just understand you're likely paying non-resident fees that first year to the state you move to.....unless you can time your move to be just after your fall hunting season in WA, and in time to reach the minimum wait period for the new state in time for their spring application period if that state requires you to buy a hunting license as part of special controlled permit applications.   


Offline CarbonHunter

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Re: Claiming residence in another state
« Reply #46 on: January 27, 2021, 06:11:43 PM »
Thanks for the input. I am looking at both Montana and Idaho but so far Montana looks to be a better place to build a future. I was planning on waiting till I was closer to retirement to start the process but with Idaho changing their NR rules Iím thinking of making the move sooner so that I can hunt the same area each year.

Offline whacker1

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Re: Claiming residence in another state
« Reply #47 on: January 28, 2021, 09:20:52 AM »
Thanks for the input. I am looking at both Montana and Idaho but so far Montana looks to be a better place to build a future. I was planning on waiting till I was closer to retirement to start the process but with Idaho changing their NR rules Iím thinking of making the move sooner so that I can hunt the same area each year.

 :tup:

Offline Ridgeratt

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Re: Claiming residence in another state
« Reply #48 on: January 28, 2021, 09:37:02 AM »
This was in the news a few days ago:

https://www.krem.com/article/money/consumer/north-idaho-real-estate-market/293-2b421700-5aef-4f8d-99db-6be908f804be

'I can't afford to live here': North Idaho housing prices skyrocket amid low inventory
Real estate agents say the North Idaho market is one of the most competitive they have ever seen, partly due to people from out of state buying up land.

Author: Morgan Trau (KREM)
Published: 6:45 PM PST January 23, 2021
Updated: 11:57 AM PST January 25, 2021

COEUR D'ALENE, Idaho ó North Idaho is known for its lakes, mountains and miles of land. But out-of-state buyers are purchasing that open land at a record pace.

The real estate market is booming. This is excellent for sellers but awful for buyers.

"It's really disheartening, you really think, 'Am I ever going to be able to get into a home?'" asked former Idaho resident Shannon Davis. "I can't afford to live here."


The pandemic should have decreased the Panhandle's housing prices or at least that's what Davis thought. The market did the opposite.

"It's just really depressing to not be able to have the finances to keep going up," she added. "The price just keeps going up and up and up with competition."

Davis moved to Spokane Valley, Washington, and is currently renting. She hopes to return to a city like Coeur d'Alene, Hayden or Post Falls soon.

"We're looking at the lowest inventory that we've ever seen," Haven Real Estate Group owner Cambria Henry said. "I just can't get over the prices of these homes."

Henry said the North Idaho market is the most competitive she has ever seen it.

There is one seller for every 15-20 buyers for their average priced homes. Even multi-million dollar homes have multiple offers, Henry added.

There are not even enough homes available to do a full evaluation of buyers to sellers ratio per price limit, like was shown in the Spokane market analysis.

RELATED: Spokane's rapid growth is causing housing prices to increase


Credit: Morgan Trau
Buyers to Sellers in North Idaho
There are currently 13 stick built homes in Post Falls and Coeur d'Alene has 22, she said. In January 2020, Post Falls had 215 homes on the market. In January 2021, there were 63.

The lowest price in Post Falls is $425,000 and in Coeur d'Alene is $312,000. A house in the $300,000 range is a rarity and the next lowest price after is $525,000, she showed.

This could be due to a decrease in people moving around locally and an increase in people moving in from out of state.

"We're finding that people, especially now that they are working from home, the commutes not such a big deal," Henry said. "So there's a lot of people from California and Portland that are just buying land."


The out-of-staters are planning on building in the next 10 years, she said. Right now, they are buying the land while it is relatively affordable in comparison to bigger city prices.

"They're coming up and having no problems finding a place, and to them, it's a deal," Davis added. "But it hurts us, the people that are here in the community that are really trying to find a place to buy and to live in."

Henry said there are no signs of the competition easing anytime soon. So the best thing buyers can do is just keep trying and work with an agent to get their foot in the door and get them the best price.

Online estimates, like on real estate app Zillow, are untrustworthy, according to Henry.

"The Zestimate is completely inaccurate because Idaho is a non-disclosure state, which means when you sell that home, you don't go and disclose [the actual price] anywhere," Henry added. "We don't post publicly what that home actually sold for."

Often times, homes are overvalued or undervalued on the site.

"We'll save, we'll try to earn that money for a down payment, but prices keep going up, too." Davis said. "And so, the more we save, the more out of reach it still is for us."


Offline luvmystang67

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Re: Claiming residence in another state
« Reply #49 on: January 28, 2021, 10:56:47 AM »
I'm one of the people that article mentions.  I cannot afford to buy here.   :bash:

Offline whacker1

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Re: Claiming residence in another state
« Reply #50 on: January 28, 2021, 11:04:16 AM »
This was in the news a few days ago:

https://www.krem.com/article/money/consumer/north-idaho-real-estate-market/293-2b421700-5aef-4f8d-99db-6be908f804be

'I can't afford to live here': North Idaho housing prices skyrocket amid low inventory
Real estate agents say the North Idaho market is one of the most competitive they have ever seen, partly due to people from out of state buying up land.

Author: Morgan Trau (KREM)
Published: 6:45 PM PST January 23, 2021
Updated: 11:57 AM PST January 25, 2021

COEUR D'ALENE, Idaho ó North Idaho is known for its lakes, mountains and miles of land. But out-of-state buyers are purchasing that open land at a record pace.

The real estate market is booming. This is excellent for sellers but awful for buyers.

"It's really disheartening, you really think, 'Am I ever going to be able to get into a home?'" asked former Idaho resident Shannon Davis. "I can't afford to live here."


The pandemic should have decreased the Panhandle's housing prices or at least that's what Davis thought. The market did the opposite.

"It's just really depressing to not be able to have the finances to keep going up," she added. "The price just keeps going up and up and up with competition."

Davis moved to Spokane Valley, Washington, and is currently renting. She hopes to return to a city like Coeur d'Alene, Hayden or Post Falls soon.

"We're looking at the lowest inventory that we've ever seen," Haven Real Estate Group owner Cambria Henry said. "I just can't get over the prices of these homes."

Henry said the North Idaho market is the most competitive she has ever seen it.

There is one seller for every 15-20 buyers for their average priced homes. Even multi-million dollar homes have multiple offers, Henry added.

There are not even enough homes available to do a full evaluation of buyers to sellers ratio per price limit, like was shown in the Spokane market analysis.

RELATED: Spokane's rapid growth is causing housing prices to increase


Credit: Morgan Trau
Buyers to Sellers in North Idaho
There are currently 13 stick built homes in Post Falls and Coeur d'Alene has 22, she said. In January 2020, Post Falls had 215 homes on the market. In January 2021, there were 63.

The lowest price in Post Falls is $425,000 and in Coeur d'Alene is $312,000. A house in the $300,000 range is a rarity and the next lowest price after is $525,000, she showed.

This could be due to a decrease in people moving around locally and an increase in people moving in from out of state.

"We're finding that people, especially now that they are working from home, the commutes not such a big deal," Henry said. "So there's a lot of people from California and Portland that are just buying land."


The out-of-staters are planning on building in the next 10 years, she said. Right now, they are buying the land while it is relatively affordable in comparison to bigger city prices.

"They're coming up and having no problems finding a place, and to them, it's a deal," Davis added. "But it hurts us, the people that are here in the community that are really trying to find a place to buy and to live in."

Henry said there are no signs of the competition easing anytime soon. So the best thing buyers can do is just keep trying and work with an agent to get their foot in the door and get them the best price.

Online estimates, like on real estate app Zillow, are untrustworthy, according to Henry.

"The Zestimate is completely inaccurate because Idaho is a non-disclosure state, which means when you sell that home, you don't go and disclose [the actual price] anywhere," Henry added. "We don't post publicly what that home actually sold for."

Often times, homes are overvalued or undervalued on the site.

"We'll save, we'll try to earn that money for a down payment, but prices keep going up, too." Davis said. "And so, the more we save, the more out of reach it still is for us."

As of yesterday, Spokane Valley had 1 week of inventory.  In the last 2 decades, inventory has never fallen below 1 month worth of inventory.   It is regional, not just North Idaho

Offline follow maggie

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Re: Claiming residence in another state
« Reply #51 on: January 28, 2021, 02:08:44 PM »
The article is right about the zestimate from Zillow being junk. When I sold my house is Bremerton last summer it was $47,000 low.

Offline Stein

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Re: Claiming residence in another state
« Reply #52 on: January 28, 2021, 02:16:27 PM »
Inventory shortage is pretty much a nationwide thing.  Few places aren't experiencing it.  PNW is at or near the top of the list for sure.

 


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