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Author Topic: Galliformes of the world  (Read 5537 times)

Offline Skyvalhunter

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Re: Galliformes of the world
« Reply #75 on: April 12, 2021, 05:50:25 AM »
This was one of my favorites, and also one of the hardest to take care of, especially in this climate


Love the 3D effect on this one

Offline Birdguy

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Re: Galliformes of the world
« Reply #76 on: April 12, 2021, 08:22:15 AM »
So can you guys tell me where to find some Mikado chicks or Ijima coppers? Koklass' or Blood pheasant? Are any of these available in the NW? Or does anyone have Francolins available?

Francolins would be the most likely (type dependent). We did mikados  several years ago and shipped them in. Ijimas could be found in the US but you better be looking and making contacts now. Koklass and blood pheasants I would bet the list is long and you will likely be screened as an educated breeder to get them and likely there would be strings as for as an agreement to propagate and control where those chicks went. Importing gets harder and more expensive every year and finding quality stock to import is tougher still. Folks who are raising those really numbered birds are very particular about who gets to keep them.

If you are real seroius, PM me and I will get you some folks to start talking with  :tup:

Offline LDennis24

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Re: Galliformes of the world
« Reply #77 on: April 14, 2021, 06:21:50 AM »
I'm definitely interested but I don't have anything lined up for them yet. I need to choose where I will build my pens first and see if I can get that done this year and hopefully start making a serious effort to aquire a few pairs next Spring. Thank you a bunch for the offer! Would you and Bone mind posting some pics of your old setups/enclosures? Have you ever heard of anyone in the U.S. having Capercaillies? I could tell you the exact spot I swear I came across some while blacktail hunting back in 2003 or so.

Offline jackelope

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Re: Galliformes of the world
« Reply #78 on: April 14, 2021, 07:29:50 AM »
Sounds like someone is about to dive headfirst down the rabbit hole :chuckle:

Remember the 4-H motto :chuckle: because it applies in everything. Especially breeding quality animals.

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Offline DOUBLELUNG

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Re: Galliformes of the world
« Reply #79 on: April 14, 2021, 02:06:14 PM »
What's the birds running all over the big island Hawaii?

Partridge sized, looked very huntable and were everywhere in the huntable areas of the game range.

Looked like those francolin
Gray frankolin are everywhere on Maui, my guess is that's what you saw there.  We also saw some black frankolin but they were much less common.
As long as we have the habitat, we can argue forever about who gets to kill what and when.  No habitat = no game.

Offline Birdguy

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Re: Galliformes of the world
« Reply #80 on: April 14, 2021, 08:46:16 PM »
I'm definitely interested but I don't have anything lined up for them yet. I need to choose where I will build my pens first and see if I can get that done this year and hopefully start making a serious effort to aquire a few pairs next Spring. Thank you a bunch for the offer! Would you and Bone mind posting some pics of your old setups/enclosures? Have you ever heard of anyone in the U.S. having Capercaillies? I could tell you the exact spot I swear I came across some while blacktail hunting back in 2003 or so.

I have never heard of anyone in the US having capercaillies but if I find them I may have to move out of state to own them. I totally would! Those ptarmigan and grouse. I will see if I can find some pics of my pens but would really do things different if I were building today. I have learned a bit in 20 years of chores! My retirement place will be set up differently and will be expensive! Hardware cloth will be the material of choice for most enclosures. I would have "runs out of 1" PVC coated chicken wire. I have chicken wire (pvc coated) that is 15plus years old and is in great shape even in western WA weather. The standard 2" chicken wire has been replaced once and will be again this year, it does let the snow through so much better though. I would be glad to offer any assistance I can in pen construction once you know what birds you want to get.

Offline boneaddict

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Re: Galliformes of the world
« Reply #81 on: April 14, 2021, 09:16:33 PM »
My pens were nothing to look at and Im sure I tried my best not to photograph them.  They were built out of a lot of recycled materials.   I used reclaimed wood, hand me down posts, or salvaged treated ones.  As I expanded, I split pens.   I built huts using aluminum roofing from a giant pool I salvaged.  I used apple crates turned upside down, I used wooden shipping containers as frames and ply wood.   Some had mini coops in them.   I used pheasant netting and one inch chicken wire.     They were all planted and provided what the birds needed, but all were different.   I did have electricity to them all, and they had heated water dishes and an automatic watering. Many of the hoses were throw aways.  That system worked  Except for winter months.  That was a lot of hand watering.   I had food dishes in all the pens.  I finally converted to hand feeding daily, as birds and rodents loved the smorgasbord.  Feed attracted  Rodents which attracted feral cats and snakes.  Id fill the dishes if I went on a hunting trip or vacation.   Once  October came around you had to start worrying about snow.     That was a beast.   Id build a set of pens, then another bank of pens. I had hatching pens and pens for different age groups of different pheasants as they matured.   Many species I had multiple breeders again so I could sell unrelated.    I honestly dont know what my final count was for pens.   A lot!

Offline LDennis24

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Re: Galliformes of the world
« Reply #82 on: April 15, 2021, 07:16:52 AM »
Lol, thanks guys! Sounds like it was cool either way. Like I said, I have raised California quail and Bobwhites and have built enclosures before similar to what you describe. I have also bought several dog kennels that were large and covered them with 1" chicken wire. It's amazing how snow will build up on something like that and what it weighs. If you're familiar with where I live I don't get as much standing snow as you guys in the hills. It doesn't stick around nearly as long around here. I'm no stranger to daily watering either. I have about 30+ poultry already. Guineas and silkies and lavender orpingtons. I just got a clutch of French Bresse, of course straight run with one hen and two roosters, last fall as well. Said to be the best tasting chicken in the world. Unfortunately they got frost bite in that cold windstorm we had a few months ago and their feet fell off. Yes fell off. I knew that they had frostbite as their feet swelled with fluid the next day and their pen was the one in the direct line of that wind. It came from the North which is unusual. I tried treatment but only one of them came out ok. The hen. So now I have one guinea with no feet and a few Bresse with no feet that I'm struggling to cull. They will live but the male can't breed now and they will never have quality lives. It takes alot of commitment I know. I also have a dozen lowline galloway that I breed for small acreage and icelandic sheep. And four STUPID goats. My place is a petting zoo basically!

Offline KFhunter

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Re: Galliformes of the world
« Reply #83 on: April 15, 2021, 01:09:19 PM »
Welp, totally coincidentally someone asked if I wanted some Pheasant, said their wife always orders too many.

So I have some Jumbo ringnecks soon lol


They'll be eaters I think

Offline Birdguy

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Re: Galliformes of the world
« Reply #84 on: April 15, 2021, 08:18:02 PM »
Lol, thanks guys! Sounds like it was cool either way. Like I said, I have raised California quail and Bobwhites and have built enclosures before similar to what you describe. I have also bought several dog kennels that were large and covered them with 1" chicken wire. It's amazing how snow will build up on something like that and what it weighs. If you're familiar with where I live I don't get as much standing snow as you guys in the hills. It doesn't stick around nearly as long around here. I'm no stranger to daily watering either. I have about 30+ poultry already. Guineas and silkies and lavender orpingtons. I just got a clutch of French Bresse, of course straight run with one hen and two roosters, last fall as well. Said to be the best tasting chicken in the world. Unfortunately they got frost bite in that cold windstorm we had a few months ago and their feet fell off. Yes fell off. I knew that they had frostbite as their feet swelled with fluid the next day and their pen was the one in the direct line of that wind. It came from the North which is unusual. I tried treatment but only one of them came out ok. The hen. So now I have one guinea with no feet and a few Bresse with no feet that I'm struggling to cull. They will live but the male can't breed now and they will never have quality lives. It takes alot of commitment I know. I also have a dozen lowline galloway that I breed for small acreage and icelandic sheep. And four STUPID goats. My place is a petting zoo basically!

Sounds like a great place you have for sure!!

Offline Birdguy

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Re: Galliformes of the world
« Reply #85 on: April 15, 2021, 08:20:06 PM »
Welp, totally coincidentally someone asked if I wanted some Pheasant, said their wife always orders too many.

So I have some Jumbo ringnecks soon lol


They'll be eaters I think


KF you will be quite happy with the jumbos! We have raised them for years. They are obviously bigger but also much calmer (as a rule) than standard ringnecks.

Offline KFhunter

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Re: Galliformes of the world
« Reply #86 on: May 18, 2021, 10:13:44 AM »
Just got em, hope they do ok.  I have electrolyte water and upland game bird feed. 

Once I get em home in tbe brooder they'll go.

#6 was camera shy






Offline grundy53

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Re: Galliformes of the world
« Reply #87 on: May 18, 2021, 12:25:39 PM »
Question for the experts. What would be some good breeds for the west side? Basically what could handle our moisture?

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Offline Special T

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Re: Galliformes of the world
« Reply #88 on: May 18, 2021, 01:05:55 PM »
The Maynard runs the Washington Brant foundation and has an amazing waterfowl aviary. He has a healthy flock of brant, snow geese, Egyptian geese and Emperors. He also has 2 breeding pairs of Nene the endangered Hawaiian goose.

He has hosted many elementary school feild trips and is an amazing guy to talk to. He can talk with you all things revolving around birds. Ornithology, photography, hunting, decoy carving and collecting...

Some good pics on thier FB page and the web page.

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Offline Birdguy

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Re: Galliformes of the world
« Reply #89 on: May 18, 2021, 08:21:00 PM »
Maynard is one freaking cool guy!!! He has an awesome place for sure and some crazy cool waterfowl. Just good people!!! I am on the list for mandarins and wood ducks form him this fall if all goes well.

 


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