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Author Topic: DEFINING THE BLUE MOUNTAINS ELK MANAGEMENT PROBLEM  (Read 7532 times)

Offline jackelope

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Re: DEFINING THE BLUE MOUNTAINS ELK MANAGEMENT PROBLEM
« Reply #75 on: July 08, 2021, 08:13:40 AM »
 :jacked:
:fire.:

" In today's instant gratification society, more and more pressure revolves around success and the measurement of one's prowess as a hunter by inches on a score chart or field photos produced on social media. Don't fall into the trap. Hunting is-and always will be- about the hunt, the adventure, the views, and time spent with close friends and family. " Ryan Hatfield

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Offline Timberstalker

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Re: DEFINING THE BLUE MOUNTAINS ELK MANAGEMENT PROBLEM
« Reply #76 on: July 08, 2021, 08:14:41 AM »
Ban Jerry!

 :chuckle:
If you aint hunting, you aint livin'

Offline Rainier10

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Re: DEFINING THE BLUE MOUNTAINS ELK MANAGEMENT PROBLEM
« Reply #77 on: July 08, 2021, 08:42:25 AM »
Ben Jerry?

Ice Cream?

Squirrel!

It's like herding cats around here trying to keep these threads on track.
Pain is temporary, achieving the goal is worth it.

I didn't say it would be easy, I said it would be worth it.

Every father should remember that one day his children will follow his example instead of his advice.


The views and opinions expressed in this post are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of HuntWa or the site owner.

Online LDennis24

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Re: DEFINING THE BLUE MOUNTAINS ELK MANAGEMENT PROBLEM
« Reply #78 on: July 08, 2021, 09:12:15 AM »
Well I don't know what squirrels and herding cats has to do with ice cream but I'm going to go get me some Ben & Jerry's! Now... I've asked this in another thread but what's the legality of offering natives a reward for predator control? We could have a huge pot everyone chips into and every time one of the natives gets a wolf he or she wins $250-500 etc...

Offline Rainier10

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Re: DEFINING THE BLUE MOUNTAINS ELK MANAGEMENT PROBLEM
« Reply #79 on: July 08, 2021, 10:12:04 AM »
Well I don't know what squirrels and herding cats has to do with ice cream but I'm going to go get me some Ben & Jerry's! Now... I've asked this in another thread but what's the legality of offering natives a reward for predator control? We could have a huge pot everyone chips into and every time one of the natives gets a wolf he or she wins $250-500 etc...
@bearpaw might know about this.  There is a program in Idaho that pays for wolf kills I believe.
Pain is temporary, achieving the goal is worth it.

I didn't say it would be easy, I said it would be worth it.

Every father should remember that one day his children will follow his example instead of his advice.


The views and opinions expressed in this post are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of HuntWa or the site owner.

Offline idaho guy

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Re: DEFINING THE BLUE MOUNTAINS ELK MANAGEMENT PROBLEM
« Reply #80 on: July 08, 2021, 10:51:49 AM »
Well I don't know what squirrels and herding cats has to do with ice cream but I'm going to go get me some Ben & Jerry's! Now... I've asked this in another thread but what's the legality of offering natives a reward for predator control? We could have a huge pot everyone chips into and every time one of the natives gets a wolf he or she wins $250-500 etc...
@bearpaw might know about this.  There is a program in Idaho that pays for wolf kills I believe.
   

foundation for wildlife management pays anywhere from $500-1000 for a harvested wolf in Idaho. Its all paid out of members dues they have paid hundreds of thousands of dollars out and saved countless elk and deer. Justin webb runs it out of bonners ferry I doubt they would want to get involved with the Native harvest in Washington but they actually expanded this year into Montana. It would work but I think it would be a ground up new organization specifically focused on the blues. The different tribes are all a sovereign nation, as we are constantly reminded, they could use there treaty rights to do some real good. I will donate money if somebody organized and got the tribal members on board. I have a friend of a friend type relationship with some Nez Perce that kill plenty in there I will have my freind float the idea. The freako greenies wouldnt say a word in my opinion since they are so "woke" they wouldnt want to offend anyone or God forbid appear politically incorrect.     

Offline bearpaw

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Re: DEFINING THE BLUE MOUNTAINS ELK MANAGEMENT PROBLEM
« Reply #81 on: July 08, 2021, 10:53:06 AM »
Well I don't know what squirrels and herding cats has to do with ice cream but I'm going to go get me some Ben & Jerry's! Now... I've asked this in another thread but what's the legality of offering natives a reward for predator control? We could have a huge pot everyone chips into and every time one of the natives gets a wolf he or she wins $250-500 etc...
@bearpaw might know about this.  There is a program in Idaho that pays for wolf kills I believe.

Bounties are illegal. The group in Idaho reimburses trappers and hunters for expenses incurred while hunting or trapping. So if you have fuel expenses, bought a snowmobile or Utv, bought firearms, bought traps, bought hunting clothing, etc, you save your reciepts and turn them in to get reimbursed for each wolf you kill. Their organization expanded into Montana this year to do the same thing. I think it would be worth looking into reimbursing tribal members a specific amount per wolf taken for their expenses they incurred.  :twocents:

This is the Idaho/Montana group, probably the best group a person who hunts in ID or MT can belong to: https://www.foundationforwildlifemanagement.org/
Americans are systematically advocating, legislating, and voting away each others rights. Support all user groups & quit losing opportunity!

http://bearpawoutfitters.com Guided Hunts, Unguided, & Drop Camps in Idaho, Montana, Utah, and Wash. Hunts with tags available (no draw) for spring bear, fall bear, buffalo, cougar, elk, mule deer, turkey, whitetail, wolf! http://trophymaps.com DIY Hunting Maps are also offered.

Offline idaho guy

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Re: DEFINING THE BLUE MOUNTAINS ELK MANAGEMENT PROBLEM
« Reply #82 on: July 08, 2021, 10:59:28 AM »
Well I don't know what squirrels and herding cats has to do with ice cream but I'm going to go get me some Ben & Jerry's! Now... I've asked this in another thread but what's the legality of offering natives a reward for predator control? We could have a huge pot everyone chips into and every time one of the natives gets a wolf he or she wins $250-500 etc...
@bearpaw might know about this.  There is a program in Idaho that pays for wolf kills I believe.

Bounties are illegal. The group in Idaho reimburses trappers and hunters for expenses incurred while hunting or trapping. So if you have fuel expenses, bought a snowmobile or Utv, bought firearms, bought traps, bought hunting clothing, etc, you save your reciepts and turn them in to get reimbursed for each wolf you kill. Their organization expanded into Montana this year to do the same thing. I think it would be worth looking into reimbursing tribal members a specific amount per wolf taken for their expenses they incurred.  :twocents:

This is the Idaho/Montana group, probably the best group a person who hunts in ID or MT can belong to: https://www.foundationforwildlifemanagement.org/
     

 :tup: I forgot to mention the reimbursement aspect but its almost anything you use to hunt or trap wolves so I bought a new razr with tracks that I use for checking wolf traps that alone gives me 20k in reimbursement before adding in trap costs, the gun, the fuel etc etc

Online LDennis24

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Re: DEFINING THE BLUE MOUNTAINS ELK MANAGEMENT PROBLEM
« Reply #83 on: July 08, 2021, 11:10:50 AM »
Well I don't know what squirrels and herding cats has to do with ice cream but I'm going to go get me some Ben & Jerry's! Now... I've asked this in another thread but what's the legality of offering natives a reward for predator control? We could have a huge pot everyone chips into and every time one of the natives gets a wolf he or she wins $250-500 etc...
@bearpaw might know about this.  There is a program in Idaho that pays for wolf kills I believe.

Bounties are illegal. The group in Idaho reimburses trappers and hunters for expenses incurred while hunting or trapping. So if you have fuel expenses, bought a snowmobile or Utv, bought firearms, bought traps, bought hunting clothing, etc, you save your reciepts and turn them in to get reimbursed for each wolf you kill. Their organization expanded into Montana this year to do the same thing. I think it would be worth looking into reimbursing tribal members a specific amount per wolf taken for their expenses they incurred.  :twocents:

This is the Idaho/Montana group, probably the best group a person who hunts in ID or MT can belong to: https://www.foundationforwildlifemanagement.org/

This is kind of what I was thinking of anyways Dale. Whatever legal definition you would need in place to make it happen and then start pooling money into it to give folks some incentive to get out there. The Blues are very hard to access in some areas. Everything is on the top of the ridge and you have to go down to get somewhere. That means packing out is always uphill so a lot of folks don't like getting into it. I feel like it will be harder than other areas in this state.

Offline bearpaw

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Re: DEFINING THE BLUE MOUNTAINS ELK MANAGEMENT PROBLEM
« Reply #84 on: July 08, 2021, 11:18:20 AM »
Well I don't know what squirrels and herding cats has to do with ice cream but I'm going to go get me some Ben & Jerry's! Now... I've asked this in another thread but what's the legality of offering natives a reward for predator control? We could have a huge pot everyone chips into and every time one of the natives gets a wolf he or she wins $250-500 etc...
@bearpaw might know about this.  There is a program in Idaho that pays for wolf kills I believe.

Bounties are illegal. The group in Idaho reimburses trappers and hunters for expenses incurred while hunting or trapping. So if you have fuel expenses, bought a snowmobile or Utv, bought firearms, bought traps, bought hunting clothing, etc, you save your reciepts and turn them in to get reimbursed for each wolf you kill. Their organization expanded into Montana this year to do the same thing. I think it would be worth looking into reimbursing tribal members a specific amount per wolf taken for their expenses they incurred.  :twocents:

This is the Idaho/Montana group, probably the best group a person who hunts in ID or MT can belong to: https://www.foundationforwildlifemanagement.org/

This is kind of what I was thinking of anyways Dale. Whatever legal definition you would need in place to make it happen and then start pooling money into it to give folks some incentive to get out there. The Blues are very hard to access in some areas. Everything is on the top of the ridge and you have to go down to get somewhere. That means packing out is always uphill so a lot of folks don't like getting into it. I feel like it will be harder than other areas in this state.

They work together with the agencies, I'm not sure that could happen in WA, but here's info from their web page:

F4WM brings those who want wolves managed- State Game management agencies, outdoor enthusiasts, hunters, and ranchers, together with those who have the ways and means to get the job done!

With wolf hunter success rates at less than 1%, wolves habit of traveling great distances, and reproducing by up to 40% annually, managing their ever growing numbers has proven a daunting task!
   
F4WM has saved an estimated 150,000+ elk, moose, deer, and livestock, with science-based predator management.
   
F4WM has removed over 1100 wolves with just over $750,000 membership and sponsor dollars, with zero tax funding. That's less than $700 per wolf,  funded by Sportsmen, Ranchers, concerned citizens, and a few Grants. Without the F4WM program, the Idaho Wolf Control Board would be charged with removing the same wolves. Their average expense to investigate livestock depredations and remove problem wolves averaged $9005 per wolf in 2016, $8003 per wolf in early 2017, and more than $9000 per wolf in 2018... 65% of which, has historically been funded by Idaho state tax dollars. 1100 wolves x $9000 per wolf= $9,900,000... 65% Tax funded= $6,435,000 State Tax Dollars potentially saved by implementation of our Wolf Harvest Reimbursement Program.

F4WM has issued almost 1100 reimbursements since its founding, and well over $200,000 in reimbursements for 271 wolves in the 2019/2020 season.

We now have new Montana Fundraising Chapters starting up for Sanders County, Flathead Valley, and Anaconda/Butte areas. We are excited to announce we will be reimbursing F4WM Members Montana Wolf harvest this season! Please email F4WM Executive Director Justin Webb, for more info on how to join or start a new chapter in your area at justin@f4wm.org
Americans are systematically advocating, legislating, and voting away each others rights. Support all user groups & quit losing opportunity!

http://bearpawoutfitters.com Guided Hunts, Unguided, & Drop Camps in Idaho, Montana, Utah, and Wash. Hunts with tags available (no draw) for spring bear, fall bear, buffalo, cougar, elk, mule deer, turkey, whitetail, wolf! http://trophymaps.com DIY Hunting Maps are also offered.

Offline dilleytech

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Re: DEFINING THE BLUE MOUNTAINS ELK MANAGEMENT PROBLEM
« Reply #85 on: July 28, 2021, 06:24:53 AM »
This kind of stuff doesnít help. This is this kids piles of bulls from this year he made into pepperoni and jerky..

Offline Rainier10

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Re: DEFINING THE BLUE MOUNTAINS ELK MANAGEMENT PROBLEM
« Reply #86 on: July 29, 2021, 09:27:42 AM »
 :yike:
Pain is temporary, achieving the goal is worth it.

I didn't say it would be easy, I said it would be worth it.

Every father should remember that one day his children will follow his example instead of his advice.


The views and opinions expressed in this post are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of HuntWa or the site owner.

Online LDennis24

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Re: DEFINING THE BLUE MOUNTAINS ELK MANAGEMENT PROBLEM
« Reply #87 on: July 29, 2021, 09:35:00 AM »
What's the name of the antler buyer in that picture? Paul Oatman is a Nez Perce out of Kamiah I see.

Offline dilleytech

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Re: DEFINING THE BLUE MOUNTAINS ELK MANAGEMENT PROBLEM
« Reply #88 on: July 29, 2021, 10:48:50 AM »
What's the name of the antler buyer in that picture? Paul Oatman is a Nez Perce out of Kamiah I see.

I donít recall. I think I counted 9 bulls in that pic. All big mature bulls. Just being killed for profit.

Offline trophyhunt

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Re: DEFINING THE BLUE MOUNTAINS ELK MANAGEMENT PROBLEM
« Reply #89 on: July 29, 2021, 11:02:18 AM »
That Paul guy mentioned on that thread heís going to war the odoms?? Just my take, sounds like a contest who can kill more? Just my 2cents
ďIn common withĒ..... not so much!!

 


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