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Author Topic: Frontal shot on elk, situation ethics and other musings  (Read 3951 times)

Offline DOUBLELUNG

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Frontal shot on elk, situation ethics and other musings
« on: December 18, 2017, 03:21:14 PM »
I've gone back and forth on whether to share this story.  I have decided to put it out there as a lessons learned the hard way, and maybe someone else can benefit from my mistakes.  If you are reading this hoping for success pics, there aren't any.

I drew a quality archery elk permit in eastern Washington.  I have not hunted elk for several years due to severe heart disease.  Two very good friends agreed to make the trip with me; if I could kill a bull, they would handle all the hard work.  They planned to hunt grouse and bear while I hunted elk, with pre-planned radio checkins.  I can do a lot if I can go slow, but overexerting causes either an angina attack, tachycardia, or both.  I had also had an offer from another permit hunter and his buddy, to help with the pack out if I killed a bull.  I had decided going in that I would limit my shot to 40 yards on a broadside branched bull.  I also planned to hunt the gentler tops between the nasty canyons, and not go into them even if I could see or hear elk. 

It was really hot and dry leading up to the hunt, reaching the 80s every day - about 20 degrees warmer than average for late September in this area.  There was no break in the forecast for the hunt.  The day before the opener, we were able to hear 2-3 bulls bugling in dense timber.  With the warm weather causing rising thermals by mid-morning, I decided to hunt downhill into that area the opening morning.

In the predawn darkness of opening morning, we heard a couple of bugles from downhill.  I began my walk down into that area.  Fast forward to 10:30, no elk seen or heard, and little fresh sign.  I decided to work my way across the timbered basin toward an open meadow.  I had my first game encounter, a 30 yard stare down with a hen turkey and 4 poults, who worked their way out of there with a long chorus of alarm putts. 

At the edge of the meadow, I eased into the wind to a glassing spot.  Nothing to see, not surprising on a hot sunny late morning.  I decided to rest for a bit and have some lunch and hydrate.  After eating, I glassed again, this time catching movement across the meadow in the timber.  Elk!  Cow, cow, 1x2.  They quickly went out of sight, so I moved along my side of the meadow in the timber in the direction they had traveled.  I did not see the three elk, but after a lot of glassing I was able to see a group of cows bedded on a high knob back in the timber.  I eventually counted a minimum of 11 cows, and felt confident there had to be a herd bull.  A fairly short walk around the further edge of the meadow would put me with the elk but the wind was wrong, so I opted for a long, wide circling walk to put me downwind.  As I walked the meadow edge on the elk's side of the meadow, directly into the wind, I could see why they were bedded there -  the far side dropped straight down into a hellish canyon, a perfect escape path. 

About 200 yards from the bedded herd, a commotion on my left drew my immediate attention: 2 raghorn bulls had jumped up from their beds and were staring my way.  I stood still, and eventually they started scanning; they had heard or seen me, but didn't know what had spooked them.  I was waiting to see what they would do, when they bolted ahead toward where the cows were bedded.  I ranged where they had been, 58 yards.  A loud throaty scream confirmed my suspicion of a herd bull - they had gotten close to the cows and he was PISSED. 

What commenced next was one of the most intense stalks I've ever experienced.  I quickly advanced and soon was watching the 1x2 eating leaves off a serviceberry.  32 yards.  I had an arrow nocked and was very tempted to take him.  I heard the bull scream again, and this time I could see his antler tips coming my way.  Then he turned and disappeared back the way he had come.  This display convinced the spike to move away and disappear down into the canyon.  I ranged the tree where the bull turned - 81 yards.  I continued to stalk into the wind, one step at a time, scanning 180 between each step - I knew there were lots of eyes straight ahead.  I made it about 15 yards and sure enough, there was a cow feeding about 45 yards to my right.  I was pinned.

Over the next 30-40 minutes, anywhere from 1-7 cows were continuously in sight.  I was able to occasionally make a 1/2 step while all eyes were off me.  I can't count the times cows stared straight at me, all the while expecting a change in the wind or movement of a cow to cause them to wind me.  Amazingly, it never happened.  The bull calmed down slightly and started to occasionally bugle rather than scream, but he was still jacked up and would threaten the cows with his antlers whenever he got close to them, causing them to jump away.  I think this was the reason the cows never spooked on me, they were too aware of him as a threat.  He kept up his circuits, but now he was turning away at 63-65 yards. 

My calves were crying from all the enforced stillness and awkward positions.  I kept willing the cows to go out of sight, but as soon as one did another would wander into sight.  If they would just go out of sight, I would scamper quickly ahead 25 yards across a dip in the hillside.  Finally, the bull came closer, threatened the cows and they all ran over the crest out of sight.  Up to this point, all I had seen was the top of his rack.  I scooted ahead, keeping my eyes on the top of his rack until I could see thirds, then stopped behind a big ponderosa. I leaned to the left, and ranged his butt at 40 yards.  The tree behind him was 44 yards, the one in front 22.  I leaned to the right, and as I was settling my pin a group of 7 cows ran over the crest and stopped between me and him  >:(.  The closest cow was approximately 15 yards.  They would glance my way but were focused on the bull.  I slowly, slowly eased my draw back down.  The cows spun end and ran back the way they had come.  The bull was no longer broadside, but quartered away.  I dropped my pin down behind his shoulder and released. 

A lot happened in an instant.  The bull was wheeling and then running straight away.  I heard the crack of arrow on bone, and then the whole herd was bailing down into the nasty canyon.  I looked the time on my GPS: 12:27.  I collapsed to the ground and had a much needed drink.  I turned on my radio for my 12:30 checkin and said "I just shot a herd bull". 

Skipping a lot of chatter, we determined that they were beyond the far side of the canyon.  They would come to the far side rim and glass, while I checked out the scene on my side.  I marked my shot location with a piece of flagging tape, and walked the line of my shot.  I reached the tree that had been beyond the bull.  No hair, no blood.  I came back and found the tracks where he jumped, and dropped a piece of flagging tape.  Ranged back to my shot location: 32 yards.  The hit would have been high if I held true on the 40 - did I hit the scapula? 

The radio crackled and I heard "we found a group of cows and three bulls".  What are they? 1x2, 4x3, 4x4.  That's not them, this guy had 4ths and three points behind, probably 7x7.  A long while later, we've got him, he's standing by himself behind some brush.  Standing? crud.  Keep eyes on and I'll make my way around the head of the canyon and meet you.  As I was making my way there, I heard "He's in the open.  He's got an arrow sticking out of his a**".  "Are you <messing> with me?" "No.  Wish I was."  I felt like  :puke:

About an hour later, after one of them met me at the head of the canyon and led me to their vantage, I was able to look through the spotter and see for myself.  The broadhead was buried in his pelvis, midway between his right hip joint and anus.  A good 2 feet of shaft sticking out.  No hoped-for stream of blood running down his leg.  No way a lethal hit.  A slope of 40-60 degrees, and 25 elk downwind.  There was no option to approach - we decided to wait and watch.  For the next five hours, nothing happened: the bull continued to stand, the rest of the elk bedded and fed across the slope upwind.  My one buddy would occasionally muse, playing with his rangefinder: "572 yards.  I could put one in his neck with this .25/06."  "Yeah, I know you could".

Around 7:00, the bull suddenly began to walk steadily down the slope; he was favoring his right rear but it wasn't impeding him.  No broken bones.  Crap.  There's no way that's lethal.  No.  "547 yards".  "520 yards".  Yeah, whatever.  He stopped out of sight in an isolated clump of firs, about 100 yards above the canyon bottom.  This was it, another chance!  I picked a spot in the canyon bottom upcanyon/downwind of the clump of firs, and began my descent - a drop of about 1300' elevation.  The exact kind of stuff I was going to stay out of.  Oh well, Plan B.  I made the descent fine, the bottom however was a hellhole jungle.  The only way to break through was to follow the bear tunnels and shove through the dense brush.  hawthorn and rose everywhere, ripping me through my lightweight warm weather camo.  Too much effort, darn it, there goes the tachycardia.  From here out, I'm only going to get 8-12 steps between gasping rest breaks.  Radio crackles "he moved, he's 100 yards above you.  It's now or never".  I'll keep the tachycardia to myself for now.  I'm trying to move up slope ASAP, but my heart isn't cooperating.  Radio again "He's back at the top of the hill."  WTF - are you sure it's him - yeah, I can see the arrow.  It's sunset.  No way I can get up the hill in time, if at all.  I tell them I am going to sidehill to the bottom, if they will get the truck (one up top, one left at the bottom).  It takes a long time, but I eventually make it out to the road.  Back to camp.

Day 2 plan: Go back to the glassing vantage and take the slope apart, hope to find the bull and make a plan to get on him.  After 3 hours of glassing, no elk seen, though the same group of whitetails and turkeys make appearances.  Why don't you guys go look for a bear/scouting, I'm just going to walk that ridgeline out and then sidehill the elk trails and see if he's there.  You sure?  Yeah, I'll take it slow, I'll be back out to the road by the end of the day.  On my first pass along the ridge, I see a big elk, head hidden at 78 yards.  Bull size, cow color.  Eventually get a look at the head, yep, huge lone cow.  That is the last and only game animal I see.  I make 5 passes from the ridgetop to the bottom along the sidehills of the canyonside.  Some angina, tiring but doable.  I finish sooner than expected, and am at the road in the bottom by mid-afternoon.  I decide to try the radio, no response.  I pick out a spot for a nap, leaving the radio on.  A short nap.  My buddy shows up with the truck after a half hour, he heard the radio break squelch so decided to come investigate.  He was having second thoughts about a small bear he'd passed on earlier, I said let's go there, I'm spent.  He drove to the other end of the unit, well look there - elk in the road.  He backs down the road, we get out and listen.  Big herd of elk, above and below the road.  I grab my bow and pack, and head below the road.  Come to a meadow and can see a BIG bull (320 class 6x6), being harassed by a decent satellite (260 class satellite).  About 270 yards.  This short walk though confirmed I am gassed, angina kicking in.  At least I have nitroglycerin tabs for that.  I watch the satellite make a big wide arc around the angry herd bull, he gets within 158 yards before heading back upslope.  I go back up to the road.  What happened?  My heart's gassed.  Want to go after that 6 (bugling above the road now that he's got some distance from the herd bull)?  Try to cow call him in?  No, I'm gassed, not going to try.  Back to camp for an early bed.

Day 3: Want to go back where we saw the elk yesterday?  No I'm satisfied I didn't kill that bull, and made every reasonable effort, but I still want to hunt there.  I'm going to sit on the meadow from the first day and see what happens.  Well, bulls are bugling is what is happening.  There is one in the canyon east of where I shot the bull day 1, there is a big herd at the south end of the meadow, with two potential herd bulls roughly 310 and 320, a 5x6 satellite, and at least 3 bulls bugling in the trees to the west of the meadow.  Wind is out of the west today, if I circle the edge to the east I will probably spook the one in the canyon but will be downwind of the rest.  And, it worked just like I planned. 

The big herd works west as I'm circling downwind east, and pretty soon all the elk are in the timber.  I drop in downwind of the nearest bugling bull (once they got in the trees the subordinates get bold end every bull is bugling its head off).  I'm shadowing him but all the elk are moving, this goes on for about 2 hours.  The wind is really swirly and I don't want to get too close.  About midmorning the rising thermals strengthen, and I think this would be a good time to find a high knob and try some cow calling.  I find the perfect spot, 7 pines growing roughly in a circle, and shooting lanes in most directions in the clear from 25-60+ yards.  I'm hoping whichever direction a bull may come from, he'll approach from below my elevation and the rising thermals will carry my scent above. 

My first call is terrible, but three bulls respond anyway.  I follow up with a series of plaintiff lost horny cow chirps (I hope), and the bulls respond encouragingly.  The bull to my southwest is definitely approaching, and I think the one due west may be also.  Yes, the one southwest is definitely coming.  I respond to his bugles with more lost horny cow chirps, and suddenly I see the top of his antlers coming through the trees, right at me.  He is between two trunks I earlier ranged at 16 and 22 yards, I can see his ears, he is scanning left and right looking for the cow.  I come to full draw and lean left around my tree, I'm too far forward and I can't swing the bow far enough right.  I slowly lean back, bring the broadhead behind the trunk and to the right, I'm right on his neck but I can't see his chest - I need him to take one more step up.  As he swings his head away I move my right foot an inch and make a tiny scuffing noise, he hears it and steps up.  My 20 yard pin is rock steady on the bulge of his trachea in his mane, just up from where the long neck hair meets the body hair .  I release and watch the arrow centerpunch the bulge , disappears completely into his mane hair before he wheels and bolts back the way he came.  Dead elk.  Shortly after I hear wet cough, followed seconds later by a crash.  8:30am.  I am able to reach my friends, tell them I killed a bull, and give them my GPS coordinates.  I sit down and wait for them to arrive with pack frames, which they do.  I tell the whole story.  I've taken this shot twice on deer, with results of dead right there (shooting uphill, broke its spine) and one that ran 30 yards and cartwheeled dead.  We go to get my dead elk.

Fast forward 7 hours.  My buddies have diligently done 7 hours of intuitive searches, after the first hour I started a GPS grid search and have done 300 yards out in a 3/4 circle arc, just shy of 3 miles in 6 hours without ever getting more than 300 yards from the shot.  My buddies have covered much more, and I have stayed on track to the greatest extent possible, but some really thick brush and again the only way through at times was to deviate and shove through a bear tunnel.  I found one quarter sized drop of serous red fluid, I think bloody saliva from the poke through the windpipe.  That's it.  It is now mid-afternoon, 7 hours have passed.  temperature has reached upper 80s, and any possible meat recovery window is closed.  I'm utterly spent.  I have four days left, but I'm quite sure I killed this bull and I'm not shooting another.  I have no interest in recovering the antlers without the meat.  I'm done, time to grab a meal, hit the rack, and pack up and head home tomorrow.

That's enough for one post.

 




As long as we have the habitat, we can argue forever about who gets to kill what and when.  No habitat = no game.

Offline Doublelunger

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Re: Frontal shot on elk, situation ethics and other musings
« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2017, 04:42:46 PM »
I release and watch the arrow centerpunch the bulge , disappears completely into his mane hair before he wheels and bolts back the way he came. 



Thanks for sharing, sorry about the outcome but sounds like it was an eventful series of events for you. Glad you were able to accomplish what you did given your health also. Are you sure that you centerpunched him? I don't have experience with frontal shots, but if you really did center punch him and the arrow completely disappeared I would think that shot would be 110 percent lethal. Is it possible the arrow went off of center one way or the other and passed between brisket and front shoulder, basically going through the armpit and not hitting any vitals?

Offline vandeman17

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Re: Frontal shot on elk, situation ethics and other musings
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2017, 04:43:24 PM »
tagging for next update. Curious what caused your first shot to miss and hit they far back. Sounds like he will survive which is the good part.
" I have hunted almost every day of my life, the rest have been wasted"

Offline eastfork

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Re: Frontal shot on elk, situation ethics and other musings
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2017, 05:05:17 PM »
Ill take a frontal shot any time. Its been a very effective shot for me, especially when solo hunting/calling and they walk right into you. That being said, if i have a straight on chest shot i take that over a neck shot. If i shot for the neck i aim right below his chin. Center it up and they drop like a box of rocks.

Offline boneaddict

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Re: Frontal shot on elk, situation ethics and other musings
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2017, 05:29:40 PM »
Well, at least you were into elk.  Sorry it didnít work out as planned. Rough break.
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Offline fastdam

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Re: Frontal shot on elk, situation ethics and other musings
« Reply #5 on: December 18, 2017, 05:31:56 PM »
I'll take any shot I have, including a frontal shot. I like the challenge of non traditional situations. When I go hunting I am looking to put meat in our freezer. There is nothing respectful about killing a free creature so I really don't worry about waiting for the perfect situation and possibly missing about opportunity.   Ethics,.....well,  those are imaginary constructs of society.  We all have our own and they are not all the same so I don't in any way feel obligated to adhere to anyone else's but mine.

Offline gonehuntin68

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Re: Frontal shot on elk, situation ethics and other musings
« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2017, 05:58:26 PM »
I'll take any shot I have, including a frontal shot. I like the challenge of non traditional situations. When I go hunting I am looking to put meat in our freezer. There is nothing respectful about killing a free creature so I really don't worry about waiting for the perfect situation and possibly missing about opportunity.   Ethics,.....well,  those are imaginary constructs of society.  We all have our own and they are not all the same so I don't in any way feel obligated to adhere to anyone else's but mine.

So you take random bad shots?

Online Duckslayer89

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Re: Frontal shot on elk, situation ethics and other musings
« Reply #7 on: December 18, 2017, 06:06:46 PM »
I'll take any shot I have, including a frontal shot. I like the challenge of non traditional situations. When I go hunting I am looking to put meat in our freezer. There is nothing respectful about killing a free creature so I really don't worry about waiting for the perfect situation and possibly missing about opportunity.   Ethics,.....well,  those are imaginary constructs of society.  We all have our own and they are not all the same so I don't in any way feel obligated to adhere to anyone else's but mine.

 :yike:  :hunt2:

Offline elkboy

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Re: Frontal shot on elk, situation ethics and other musings
« Reply #8 on: December 18, 2017, 06:11:10 PM »
No predator in nature is 100% effective, even humans with modern hunting weapons (bow, muzzy, modern firearm).  And elk are some of the toughest animals out there.   

I am sorry your hunt didn't have the outcome that you had hoped for, DoubleLung, but thank you for sharing the hard stories as well as the good ones.  It encourages those who have had similar experiences.  It educates those who haven't been there yet.  And above all, it is a good reminder that hunting is difficult, and that we all can think about preparing well for next season, regardless of current skill level. 

Thanks again.     

Offline Watimberghost

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Re: Frontal shot on elk, situation ethics and other musings
« Reply #9 on: December 18, 2017, 06:16:26 PM »
 :yeah:

I didn't read fastdam saying he took random bad shots?

I had a similar expirience this year with a frontal shot that I felt good about. Still a kick in tbe gut... sometimes its not like the hunting shows where you have minutrs to wait for a perfect broadside shot. Thanks for sharing doublelung.

Offline gonehuntin68

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Re: Frontal shot on elk, situation ethics and other musings
« Reply #10 on: December 18, 2017, 06:25:44 PM »
:yeah:

I didn't read fastdam saying he took random bad shots?

I had a similar expirience this year with a frontal shot that I felt good about. Still a kick in tbe gut... sometimes its not like the hunting shows where you have minutrs to wait for a perfect broadside shot. Thanks for sharing doublelung.

If I took any shot I had I would have had a lot of random bad shots. Seen lots of just butts. Should you take that?

Offline hunter399

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Re: Frontal shot on elk, situation ethics and other musings
« Reply #11 on: December 18, 2017, 06:40:57 PM »
You know bad shots happen,runoffs,and no blood trails,it just a part of hunting,it happens to the best of us,it feels bad ,gut punch ,but it will be ok.Sounds like you made good effort in recovery,trying to find what you shot at ,that's the most important part , and better than a lot hunters,so great story,good ethics,better luck next time. :tup:
Two birds in the Bush is always better than one in the hand-that way you can always go to the Bush and hunt another day .conservation=Better hunting.
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Offline Wanttohuntmore

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Re: Frontal shot on elk, situation ethics and other musings
« Reply #12 on: December 18, 2017, 07:04:00 PM »
From experience, i won't take frontal shots.   Not worth it.   I also won't share my hunting spots with those that do,  not enough elk to lose a few....

Offline hogslayer

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Re: Frontal shot on elk, situation ethics and other musings
« Reply #13 on: December 18, 2017, 07:14:59 PM »
I have taken two frontal shots and both were dead fast.  Killed a 6 Point this bull this year with an arrow right between the sternum and shoulder. Came out opposite side in the guts. The elk slowly walked away and bedded down 20 yards away in plain sight. He was hurt bad. 

Offline Karl Blanchard

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Re: Frontal shot on elk, situation ethics and other musings
« Reply #14 on: December 18, 2017, 08:08:39 PM »
I'll never turn down a frontal shot within my own personal comfort zone for hitting that spot.   You gave it hell buddy, hold your head high!  Wish I could have made it down to help out.
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