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Author Topic: taking care of meat  (Read 3804 times)

Offline Buckhunter24

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Re: taking care of meat
« Reply #15 on: January 23, 2020, 03:28:00 PM »
Thanks wapiti. This is what I have been reading, break it down immediately, hang it in the shade in a draw near water if possible. Keep it dry, maybe spray with citric acid (i will have to read more on this). And get it to the cooler as fast as possible :tup:

I look forward to giving this a go. We've both worked in the woods our whole lives but bever done a backcountry hunt.

If anyone knows any other tricks, throw them out there! Maybe it will be in the 40s  :chuckle:


Offline HikerHunter

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Re: taking care of meat
« Reply #16 on: January 28, 2020, 04:07:13 PM »
The initial cool-down or lack of it actually is what causes the majority of meat loss IMO. So the "break down immediately" is spot on.

One thing to be careful with if you are boning out right away and hanging, don't hang a huge glob of meat that could trap heat in the middle.

Offline Tbob

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Re: taking care of meat
« Reply #17 on: February 20, 2020, 04:06:18 AM »
Agreed with most advice here. When I break mine down I actually like to leave it on the bone, as itís easier for me to handle in my pack and sometimes that big ball of meat stays really warm in the center. Iíll usually just cut some nice long slices along the muscle groups down to the bone to get it to cool. Everything is the same. Keep it dry, place in the shade, maybe in a creek draw and Iíll even throw a tarp over the top, just to keep xtra shade and any dew off it that may try and form over night. Good luck out there!!

Offline Shawn Ryan

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Re: taking care of meat
« Reply #18 on: February 27, 2020, 06:48:58 PM »
Sometimes you don't have the right trees to hang your meat in a cool draw. In that case, laying them on a grid of sticks, preferably right above running water, with air circulating under and over, will keep meat cool. Photo is elk quarters in mid-Sept.

Offline 444Marlin

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Re: taking care of meat
« Reply #19 on: February 27, 2020, 09:04:04 PM »
I thought there was a more recent thread than this on the subject but cannot find it.

Looking at doing a wilderness hunt this September with my dad. If we manage to bag a deer, any tips on meat care? Average temps mid september can be pretty dang high. I have never shot an animal in September and the temps have me worried a bit.
Depending on if it's a blacktail and how long the hunt is, you might be able to eat the thing before you get out of there!  :chuckle:

I worry about the hot September hunts, and if it's forecasted to be much above mid-70's, I'll keep my hunts closer to the rig and closer to a place I can take my meat to.  If there's really cold overnight temps, I can cool off the meat just by hanging it, keeping it in the shade, wrapping it in a sleeping bag.  Being far off the grid is great, but meat spoilage sucks.  You need to adjust your hunt based on those factors.

 


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