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Author Topic: Bucks that forever haunt you  (Read 4403 times)

Offline Deerdad44

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Re: Bucks that forever haunt you
« Reply #45 on: November 03, 2019, 07:02:32 AM »
Loving these stories! You just never know what's going to happen in the deer woods. That is part of why we are out there chasing these things around.

Offline 3nails

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Re: Bucks that forever haunt you
« Reply #46 on: November 10, 2019, 09:03:35 PM »
 It's been 4 years and I've barely spoken about this to anyone.  A late October morning found me about 6 miles from my truck in one of my favorite blacktail spots. It was cold and sleeting. I hunted from first light down a finger ridge out of the alpine meadows into the timber below. What an epic blacktail morning it was. I was expecting to see a mature buck any minute with hopes of seeing a beast I had on trail cam. Around 11 o'clock I decided to come back out of the timber and hunt down the next finger ridge in the same way. About 100 yds above tree line I sidehilled over a saddle to have different look at the area I just came from. This is where the image of the buck I had on cam will forever be etched in my mind. There below me at tree line was the unmistakable white faced, black browed buck staring straight at me, slightly quartering my way. This was one of those moments where you go right into shooting mode. I extended my bipod, got a solid rest and held mid shoulder. With his angle I knew this would drop him instantly and in the high country this can be extremely important. At the shot I knew immediately it was true and sure enough his belly and chin hit the dirt simultaneously. Probably the most sure I'd ever been of an instant kill. His hooves went in the air as he rolled over downhill into the mountain ash and disappearing into the timber. I sat there in disbelief of what just happened. It happened so quick! I had to carefully work my way to where he died as to not join him in the steep icy slope. Upon arriving it was easy to see where he tumbled. I began following with an uneasy feeling in my stomach but didn't know why. About 60 yds down my uneasiness increased dramatically as it led off a 200'+ cliff. At first thought I was bummed at how much more work this was going to be. I worked my way around the side of the cliff and back to the bottom where shale tapered the slope. Now the uneasiness turned to a upset stomach as there was no sign at all of him at the bottom. Looking up the cliff I could barely see any rock due to all the heather and stunted alpine fir growing out of it. I instantly realized he was hung up in there somewhere. I went back and forth around that cliff several times trying to get into it. At one point I slipped at the top nearly going over. (I've never told my wife about that) I decided right there that no deer was worth ruining my wifes life. I backed out and sought help from a friend. Two days later Skagitsteel and I attempted to go look for him but we couldn't get wirhin 3 miles of the cliff due to a massive storm that dropped several feet of snow. The snowpack got deeper from there all winter. I've been to the bottom of that cliff several times since and have yet to see even a bone. Poof. Gone forever. Still saddens me very much.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2019, 09:16:29 PM by 3nails »
Is He worthy?

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Offline 3nails

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Re: Bucks that forever haunt you
« Reply #47 on: November 10, 2019, 09:09:18 PM »
Here he is on cam.
Is He worthy?

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Offline 7mmfan

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Re: Bucks that forever haunt you
« Reply #48 on: November 11, 2019, 08:18:23 AM »
That's rough. I've never really considered the chance that a buck ends up somewhere I can't get to him. After spending some time in the alpine this year, I can visualize exactly what you're describing though. That would be a very tough pill to swallow.
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Offline 2MANY

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Re: Bucks that forever haunt you
« Reply #49 on: November 11, 2019, 09:00:13 AM »
Nails,
You are not alone.
I've lost 2 big alpine blacktails to the most bizarre of situations.


Offline Transka

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Re: Bucks that forever haunt you
« Reply #50 on: November 11, 2019, 01:42:30 PM »
 :drool:

Offline bigmacc

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Re: Bucks that forever haunt you
« Reply #51 on: November 14, 2019, 03:42:55 PM »

I have another that I will tell another time, it involves my great grandpa and a certain "tree", those that know me know what I,m talking about. I,m going to be gone for a few days, I,ll type it up when I get back. Keep them coming everyone, all are great stories, we've all been there :tup:

Here is the story of my great grandpa and the "tree", I remember him telling me the story up until the year he died at the age of 92, he hunted into his 80,s but then the arthritis started crippling him up pretty bad and my dad would bring him over just to be in the camp he started in 1917. He and my great grandma were good friends over the years with some of the original familys of the Methow, Wagner and Sullivan to name a couple along with many, many more. Through those friendships they would take folks from the Methow up to Alaska to hunt moose and caribou and to fish for 60lb kings. Through the years and miles upon miles of hiking on foot and on horseback my great grandparents found some, lets just say "unique" spots to hunt deer. Many of the areas, landmarks etc. were named by my great grandma and to this day there are people I run into that call those spots what my great grandma named them 70, 80, 90 or 100 years ago, could be someone pumping gas or a stranger I run into in the woods, its always pretty neat. My great grandparents were very well respected back in there day and did a lot for the herd, everything from helping feed during tough winters to planting thousands and thousands of buckbrush starts through the years, I often will look at some on a particular hillside or two and wonder if it was planted by them. Heres the story...

Grandpa had a tree in a particular draw that he stumbled onto back in the 1920,s, he had been hiking for hours and sat under a tree to have a peach and some water. It was cold(single digits) and the migration was in full swing, little did he know that tree he sat under in that little inconspicuous draw would turn out to be one of the top 3 or 4 "deer highways" in the north valley. It was early afternoon and after sitting there for about 15 minutes he heard a branch snap out in front of him aways, he sat still and quiet. For about 40 yards in front of him the terrain was fairly flat with a slight slope going downhill from him then a more drastic drop off from there, he could see 30-40 yards on each side of him and thats it. It was and is, a cold, dark hole that is full of blow downs, jack pines and gets maybe a half our of sunlight a day. He sat quietly looking in the direction of the "snap" when he seen the tips of antlers coming up the drop-off, the buck stopped short of getting to the top and all grandpa could see was horns, ears and eyeballs looking straight at him from 40 yards away. Grandpa said the spread was wide(about 3 feet he guessed) with more points than he could count but was more than 6 on each side. The stare down lasted for about 2-3 minutes with the buck every now and then quickly moving his head up and down or side to side to get what HE was looking at to flinch, grandpa didn't flinch. He thought the buck was going to move forward and crest the hill but he all the sudden spun and crashed through the jack pines, my grandpa got to his feet and flew to the edge to see over 9 or 10 big bucks along with a whole bunch of does trotting through the trees and out of sight, not a shot was fired, no time and all he had was an un-ethical shot to boot. He went on to kill 70 or so bucks with about 50 of those coming from that tree, a lot of those 70 or so were BIG deer but he said none were the size of that buck he was in a stare down with. He figured out how to hunt that highway and passed it on to us, very few people know of this spot except for family and a few old Game Dept fellas, we have never seen another person in there or signs of anyone for that matter. I posted a picture on here(and pulled it off) of an old Game warden friend of grandpa and grandma who was from Alaska, he killed a buck at that tree that had 14 on one side and 11 on the other back in the 40,s, Gabe(the warden) was 6ft 3 or 4 and that buck hanging in the tree with him standing next to it made Gabe look like a little kid, I know when they put it on a scale it was well over 400lb, there was over 200 deer that came up that draw the day Gabe killed that buck, a huge herd that was on the move to get from point A to point B. We still hunt it a couple times a year but with the seasons set up the way they are they don't move through there till later. We do go in there a couple times each year in November and up until about 20 years ago would see 5-600 move through there over a couple days time. Nowadays 30-40 over the same couple days, kind of puts things in perspective.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2019, 03:52:46 PM by bigmacc »

Offline skagitsteel

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Re: Bucks that forever haunt you
« Reply #52 on: November 15, 2019, 12:00:09 PM »
It's been 4 years and I've barely spoken about this to anyone.  A late October morning found me about 6 miles from my truck in one of my favorite blacktail spots. It was cold and sleeting. I hunted from first light down a finger ridge out of the alpine meadows into the timber below. What an epic blacktail morning it was. I was expecting to see a mature buck any minute with hopes of seeing a beast I had on trail cam. Around 11 o'clock I decided to come back out of the timber and hunt down the next finger ridge in the same way. About 100 yds above tree line I sidehilled over a saddle to have different look at the area I just came from. This is where the image of the buck I had on cam will forever be etched in my mind. There below me at tree line was the unmistakable white faced, black browed buck staring straight at me, slightly quartering my way. This was one of those moments where you go right into shooting mode. I extended my bipod, got a solid rest and held mid shoulder. With his angle I knew this would drop him instantly and in the high country this can be extremely important. At the shot I knew immediately it was true and sure enough his belly and chin hit the dirt simultaneously. Probably the most sure I'd ever been of an instant kill. His hooves went in the air as he rolled over downhill into the mountain ash and disappearing into the timber. I sat there in disbelief of what just happened. It happened so quick! I had to carefully work my way to where he died as to not join him in the steep icy slope. Upon arriving it was easy to see where he tumbled. I began following with an uneasy feeling in my stomach but didn't know why. About 60 yds down my uneasiness increased dramatically as it led off a 200'+ cliff. At first thought I was bummed at how much more work this was going to be. I worked my way around the side of the cliff and back to the bottom where shale tapered the slope. Now the uneasiness turned to a upset stomach as there was no sign at all of him at the bottom. Looking up the cliff I could barely see any rock due to all the heather and stunted alpine fir growing out of it. I instantly realized he was hung up in there somewhere. I went back and forth around that cliff several times trying to get into it. At one point I slipped at the top nearly going over. (I've never told my wife about that) I decided right there that no deer was worth ruining my wifes life. I backed out and sought help from a friend. Two days later Skagitsteel and I attempted to go look for him but we couldn't get wirhin 3 miles of the cliff due to a massive storm that dropped several feet of snow. The snowpack got deeper from there all winter. I've been to the bottom of that cliff several times since and have yet to see even a bone. Poof. Gone forever. Still saddens me very much.

Yes, that was a crazy one, That was going to be a near-impossible recovery even with ropes and harness before it dumped 2' of snow! Still can't believe nothing turned up below.  Maybe we should fly a drone up that some time and see if it turns anything up.   Although I'm pretty convinced Bigfoot got him and that's why he hasn't been found. 

Offline bhawley76

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Re: Bucks that forever haunt you
« Reply #53 on: November 15, 2019, 12:13:43 PM »
I have 3 in my stand now that are vampires, They only come out late at night wish I had a idea on how to fix that.

Offline skagitsteel

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Re: Bucks that forever haunt you
« Reply #54 on: November 15, 2019, 01:10:42 PM »
I've had a couple of bucks haunt me over the years, although none more than the first truly big Blacktail I found.  One summer I went on a mission exploring as many new places as possible, one of these places I turned up two great bucks after a 4 hour uphill bushwack into some really remote country.  One of them was especially good.  I filmed those bucks for a good hour watching, studying, seeing where they would go.  I spent a couple of trips going in and watching these bucks.  They showed up consistently enough (to this day I  have never seen any blacktail buck consistently expose themselves as these two bucks did that summer) I felt very confident to pursue them on the archery opener (I had multi-season tag).  I was a little over-confident and went right after them when I found them feeding on a dense hillside opening morning.  I stalked in for about an hour, crouched under a tree and watched the big one I wanted begin to feed toward my shooting lane.  I was new to shooting archery and felt I needed to be within 50 yards for an ethical shot.  As the buck worked toward the shooting lane I ranged it.... or tried too.  My rangefinder was completely fogged and I could not see a thing.  I frantically tried to wipe the rangefinder clean as the buck began to step across the narrow shooting lane between a fir tree and mountain ash bush.  I ranged it finally after the buck had already walked through...... 45 yards.  The buck spotted me and moved up the hill having a staredown with me at 70 yards.  No way was I taking that frontal shot with the buck looking at me so I slowly backed out and he took off.   I thought no big deal I'll get him on the next stalk, he saw me but never winded me that first time.  The next day I found them again, except way up in some cliffs feeding near ridgetop.  It was impossibly brushy on top so no way was I going to get above them without blowing every other deer off the mountain.  I foolishly thought I could stalk in below them and just wait till they fed down.  I did not account for the 7 other deer underneath them that I couldn't see.  All was going according to plan until the first doe saw me.... pretty soon it was deer running in every direction.  I could not find them again after that until two weeks later when I was still hunting through some thicker stuff with my bow and had a deer head and huge rack pop up 40 yards in front of me nothing but brush between him and I.  I was relentless after that buck that year, I hung about 3-4 cameras, I hunted bow, muzzleloader, and rifle. He became so elusive I could not even get a trail camera pics.  I got one trail camera picture of him (the only one that whole fall) of him walking the other way right after I passed by the same camera 15 minutes before.  Needless to say, he had me figured out.  I pursued that buck roughly 30 days of hunting that year and never saw him after the last time I spooked him during archery.  I left my cameras out and never had a single pic of him during the rut, I ate my tag pursuing him, passing a couple of smaller bucks in the process.

The next year I was determined as ever to figure him out, I figured out pretty early in the summer that he was still alive, however, I knew I had a lot to learn about what he does in the fall if I wanted to kill him.  I put out a lot of cameras that fall, I believe it was about 9 cams. I was getting pretty regular pictures of him until he lost velvet then 'poof' he was gone from the cameras again.  I moved cameras ll over the map that September, I think over 20 different locations to try and figure out where he went or what he was doing.  Some wise blacktail hunter encouraged me not to worry that he was still in the area somewhere. My confidence was low and I took another buck in a different spot (actually shot the wrong buck out of a group of 3 bucks) early in the season, not a buck I should have taken, but hard not to take a buck early after tag soup the year before.  I decided to do one last 'scouting day' for him that fall in the last week of October to see if I could figure out where he went and the other mature bucks in the area that all seemed to completely disappear.  That late October morning I set out in the dark and began the 3-4 hour scramble.  I chose to go to the one part of the ridge I had never been to and had written off because it looked like the least likely spot for those bucks to be, turns out that is where they had all gone once shedding velvet.  As it got light I caught a deer in the timber 30 yards in front of me, it was target buck #2 who was with the big one that the first summer.  I couldn't believe i,t their I was with a dark heavy horned 4x4 heading into his late prime years staring at me in an open season and I had no tag left! I continued my hike and less that one hour later in a small clearing in the timber I climbed over a knoll and there was the other one!  The big mature buck I had been obsessing over for 2 years, staring holes in me at 30-40 yards.  I learned a lot that day, one of the hardest lessons, it killed me to see both those monsters that day with no tag left.  That day and that buck was the driving force that drove me to learn, scout differently, go slower, be patient and wait for the right buck. Sometimes the bucks that haunt us just make us better hunters in the end.  I pursued that buck for 3 years and never got him.  That spot held the healthiest population of high country deer blacktail I've ever seen.  Several cats and a few wolves moved in and that entire spot was wiped out, not to mention the bear population keeps the fawns mowed down. I've gone back every year and it's never been more than 10% of what it once was, unfortunately, despite my efforts by removing bears.   
 

Offline bigmacc

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Re: Bucks that forever haunt you
« Reply #55 on: November 15, 2019, 06:00:49 PM »
I've had a couple of bucks haunt me over the years, although none more than the first truly big Blacktail I found.  One summer I went on a mission exploring as many new places as possible, one of these places I turned up two great bucks after a 4 hour uphill bushwack into some really remote country.  One of them was especially good.  I filmed those bucks for a good hour watching, studying, seeing where they would go.  I spent a couple of trips going in and watching these bucks.  They showed up consistently enough (to this day I  have never seen any blacktail buck consistently expose themselves as these two bucks did that summer) I felt very confident to pursue them on the archery opener (I had multi-season tag).  I was a little over-confident and went right after them when I found them feeding on a dense hillside opening morning.  I stalked in for about an hour, crouched under a tree and watched the big one I wanted begin to feed toward my shooting lane.  I was new to shooting archery and felt I needed to be within 50 yards for an ethical shot.  As the buck worked toward the shooting lane I ranged it.... or tried too.  My rangefinder was completely fogged and I could not see a thing.  I frantically tried to wipe the rangefinder clean as the buck began to step across the narrow shooting lane between a fir tree and mountain ash bush.  I ranged it finally after the buck had already walked through...... 45 yards.  The buck spotted me and moved up the hill having a staredown with me at 70 yards.  No way was I taking that frontal shot with the buck looking at me so I slowly backed out and he took off.   I thought no big deal I'll get him on the next stalk, he saw me but never winded me that first time.  The next day I found them again, except way up in some cliffs feeding near ridgetop.  It was impossibly brushy on top so no way was I going to get above them without blowing every other deer off the mountain.  I foolishly thought I could stalk in below them and just wait till they fed down.  I did not account for the 7 other deer underneath them that I couldn't see.  All was going according to plan until the first doe saw me.... pretty soon it was deer running in every direction.  I could not find them again after that until two weeks later when I was still hunting through some thicker stuff with my bow and had a deer head and huge rack pop up 40 yards in front of me nothing but brush between him and I.  I was relentless after that buck that year, I hung about 3-4 cameras, I hunted bow, muzzleloader, and rifle. He became so elusive I could not even get a trail camera pics.  I got one trail camera picture of him (the only one that whole fall) of him walking the other way right after I passed by the same camera 15 minutes before.  Needless to say, he had me figured out.  I pursued that buck roughly 30 days of hunting that year and never saw him after the last time I spooked him during archery.  I left my cameras out and never had a single pic of him during the rut, I ate my tag pursuing him, passing a couple of smaller bucks in the process.

The next year I was determined as ever to figure him out, I figured out pretty early in the summer that he was still alive, however, I knew I had a lot to learn about what he does in the fall if I wanted to kill him.  I put out a lot of cameras that fall, I believe it was about 9 cams. I was getting pretty regular pictures of him until he lost velvet then 'poof' he was gone from the cameras again.  I moved cameras ll over the map that September, I think over 20 different locations to try and figure out where he went or what he was doing.  Some wise blacktail hunter encouraged me not to worry that he was still in the area somewhere. My confidence was low and I took another buck in a different spot (actually shot the wrong buck out of a group of 3 bucks) early in the season, not a buck I should have taken, but hard not to take a buck early after tag soup the year before.  I decided to do one last 'scouting day' for him that fall in the last week of October to see if I could figure out where he went and the other mature bucks in the area that all seemed to completely disappear.  That late October morning I set out in the dark and began the 3-4 hour scramble.  I chose to go to the one part of the ridge I had never been to and had written off because it looked like the least likely spot for those bucks to be, turns out that is where they had all gone once shedding velvet.  As it got light I caught a deer in the timber 30 yards in front of me, it was target buck #2 who was with the big one that the first summer.  I couldn't believe i,t their I was with a dark heavy horned 4x4 heading into his late prime years staring at me in an open season and I had no tag left! I continued my hike and less that one hour later in a small clearing in the timber I climbed over a knoll and there was the other one!  The big mature buck I had been obsessing over for 2 years, staring holes in me at 30-40 yards.  I learned a lot that day, one of the hardest lessons, it killed me to see both those monsters that day with no tag left.  That day and that buck was the driving force that drove me to learn, scout differently, go slower, be patient and wait for the right buck. Sometimes the bucks that haunt us just make us better hunters in the end.  I pursued that buck for 3 years and never got him.  That spot held the healthiest population of high country deer blacktail I've ever seen.  Several cats and a few wolves moved in and that entire spot was wiped out, not to mention the bear population keeps the fawns mowed down. I've gone back every year and it's never been more than 10% of what it once was, unfortunately, despite my efforts by removing bears.

Great story....Persistance, experience, learn. Thats why you are a good hunter, and if you are real good you do those three in reverse ;) :tup:...... My great grandparents always said to "learn backwards" when it came to hunting, one of those things(lessons) you got to think about I guess.

Offline Gringo31

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Re: Bucks that forever haunt you
« Reply #56 on: November 15, 2019, 08:17:17 PM »
tagging for when I get time to read
We must reject the idea that every time a law's broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions.
-Ronald Reagan

Offline bigmacc

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Re: Bucks that forever haunt you
« Reply #57 on: November 15, 2019, 09:14:44 PM »
One more from my good friend(will remain nameless) :chuckle: :chuckle:.... A little background as usual. He has been a friend of mine for over 50 years, we wrestled together(highschool and college) and were in more than one bar fight together :dunno: Our wives were good friends also but from different schools. Late 60,s-early 70,s(who knows, all I can tell you is mine and his hero was Dan Gable). To this day he is part of our camp and next to my brother and son there is not more men I would count on......PERIOD. Everyone of them has a story and if they are not careful I will tell everyone of them :chuckle:

I think it was in the 80,s, my friend and I, along with everyone else in camp(thanks to my dad) had found "a new spot" :chuckle:It was an "obvious spot" and my dad had driven by it for 40 years or so on the way to "little Bellingham". He always said that deer crossed this particular area and soon it turned into trips taken at midnight, 1 AM, 2 AM etc. etc., we would be perched all around "this spot" for recon from dusk til dawn with reports due to camp every day to see if it was worth bringing firepower to. Well, one year I think we killed 9 or 10 bucks out of this stupid spot, the next year it was even more and more. One year we killed a "collared and tagged" deer that came from  50-60 miles out of Canada (B.C, Think I told the story on here before). It was an extremely, unusual place. The only deer my dad had mounted came from this place and it wasn't because he wanted it mounted, it was because another guy took the dang thing, caped it and mounted it for him, he told dad "thats the biggest f@#$!% buck I have ever seen", my dad later gave it away :chuckle:, he said, "I,ll get another one" :chuckle:.

OK, my friend......He sat on this "spot" for 7 days, yep 7 days, he missed....... yep, MISSED 7 BUCKS! My buddy had a messed up shoulder and couldn't hit the broadside of a barn. He made sure to have someone with him in case, but I can tell you this, he never came close. One morning we were in "the spot" about 2 hours before daylight, we hunkered down against a big rock so when the sun came up it would be to our right. I woke up a little before sunrise and immediately looked to where the sun would rise, there was a HUGE buck, silloueted on top of the ridge moving up hill, I tapped my buddy on the shoulder and said "M@#$, look at the size of that bugger", he tipped his hat to it and said.....I SWEAR, "Im asleep and I can't afford any more bullets" and he layed back down. I watched that mossback take about 10 steps and drop over the side, it was amazing seeing it with the moon behind it, I have never seen anything like it since, it almost looked like a painting, huge buck....It may not haunt him but it haunts me :chuckle::
« Last Edit: November 15, 2019, 09:27:31 PM by bigmacc »

 


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