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Author Topic: 6 grains/pound rule????  (Read 3591 times)

Offline Rob

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Re: 6 grains/pound rule????
« Reply #15 on: May 16, 2022, 03:18:40 PM »
I would read that as it requires at least 40lbs of pull to reach a 28 in or full draw. 

In other words it took 40 pounds of pull to get to full draw, regardless of how much let-off there is once at full draw.


But it is written a bit confusing.
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Offline dilleytech

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Re: 6 grains/pound rule????
« Reply #16 on: July 24, 2022, 01:44:37 PM »
Heavier arrows penetrate better, fly better, and result in a quieter bow on the shot. Speed does help some with accuracy as far as elevation guessing goes but if your using a rangefinder you really are better off with a heavier arrow. You don’t need to shoot anything crazy like 600+ but being in the 450-500 range is a good arrow weight I think. You will wish you had a heavier arrow when you meet a shoulder blade. Also if your shooting a lighter weight arrow make sure your shooting a good smaller fixed blade broadhead to help with penetration.

Offline blackveltbowhunter

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Re: 6 grains/pound rule????
« Reply #17 on: July 24, 2022, 03:23:20 PM »
I agree. All else being equal. A well tuned 420 grain arrow, will knock the water out of a 500 grain  corksrew. Weight alone is only part of the equation.

So many variables, and changing one thing change everything. If a shooter is a perfectionist get a saw and build your own, this will allow the most options to really customize the spine and find one your bow really loves in the numbers you want. Other wise find a shop willing to discuss arrows and builds  and has knowledge and will attempt to tailor to those needs. Adding weights to the front of arrows, or cutting them short to maximize FOC, spine charts tend to go out the window.

Offline GWP

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Re: 6 grains/pound rule????
« Reply #18 on: July 24, 2022, 07:59:11 PM »
I have a ‘large’ friend that shoots 632 (measured) grain 32” aluminum full length arrows with his old Hoyt bow that is 87 lbs (measured three times) and he pulls it back and holds it like it is nothing. That is speed and weight.
You ain’t seen nothing until you see someone shoot something like that.
Every shot knocked over my target. It was worth going and setting it up just to watch him knock it over again.
Reminded me of watching Brock Lesner yanking a deer he shot out of a creek, and then walking off, dragging it with one hand. They are both very powerful humans.
Me? Before shoulder surgeries, 63 lb bow shooting 365 grains. My deer have been through and through shots, but none were more than 20 yards away.
If you go light on pounds, get closer.

Offline dilleytech

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Re: 6 grains/pound rule????
« Reply #19 on: July 27, 2022, 01:48:54 PM »
I have a ‘large’ friend that shoots 632 (measured) grain 32” aluminum full length arrows with his old Hoyt bow that is 87 lbs (measured three times) and he pulls it back and holds it like it is nothing. That is speed and weight.
You ain’t seen nothing until you see someone shoot something like that.
Every shot knocked over my target. It was worth going and setting it up just to watch him knock it over again.
Reminded me of watching Brock Lesner yanking a deer he shot out of a creek, and then walking off, dragging it with one hand. They are both very powerful humans.
Me? Before shoulder surgeries, 63 lb bow shooting 365 grains. My deer have been through and through shots, but none were more than 20 yards away.
If you go light on pounds, get closer.

An old hoyt at 87# is probably a bit slower then modern 70# bows. What your witnessing at the target is all about the momentum of that very heavy arrow. Girls kill plenty of animals with 40# bows and light arrows. I wouldn’t be afraid of a faster lighter arrow as much as how that arrow flys, how strong the arrow is on impact and how loud your bow is going off.

Broadside with a fixed blade to the ribs and it doesn’t really matter once the arrow is there.

 


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