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Author Topic: Eating your catch  (Read 3217 times)

Offline JakeLand

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Re: Eating your catch
« Reply #15 on: November 21, 2020, 09:01:38 PM »
Wolves and fox both stink

Offline Timberstalker

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Re: Eating your catch
« Reply #16 on: November 21, 2020, 09:08:16 PM »
So do some beavers. Just saying.
If you aint hunting, you aint livin'

Offline 92xj

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Re: Eating your catch
« Reply #17 on: November 21, 2020, 09:23:06 PM »
So do some beavers. Just saying.

Depends on the amount of hair
"If you have to be crazy to hunt ducks, I do not wish to be sane."

Offline Humptulips

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Re: Eating your catch
« Reply #18 on: November 21, 2020, 09:47:45 PM »
Coyotes and crows won’t even eat a otter
The old lady pulled into the driveway last night and saw a coyote trying to pull a ziplock bagged otter skull off a cable spool by my garage.


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I believe that coyote planned on setting it on fire in front of your door, ringing the doorbell and running. :dunno:
Bruce Vandervort

Offline DishBogget

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Re: Eating your catch
« Reply #19 on: November 22, 2020, 07:46:59 AM »
Coyotes and crows won’t even eat a otter
The old lady pulled into the driveway last night and saw a coyote trying to pull a ziplock bagged otter skull off a cable spool by my garage.


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I believe that coyote planned on setting it on fire in front of your door, ringing the doorbell and running. :dunno:
Could be I was surprised as well ,
But it did happen


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Offline Humptulips

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Re: Eating your catch
« Reply #20 on: November 22, 2020, 11:05:10 AM »
One of my favorite quotes from Wiley Carrol, "Anything that stinks has value as coyote lure."
Bruce Vandervort

Offline Loup Loup

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Re: Eating your catch
« Reply #21 on: November 23, 2020, 05:46:57 PM »
Alchase: I have been schooled that wolves could be vectors of a varity of blood borne diseases. I have been taught to wear gloves and wash my skinning tools in bleach solution after skinning wolves. And honestly it wasnt a hard sell. Some wolves are really nasty. Its not like theyve rolled in something rotten, its just a really rank smell that permeates your skin.
I remember a wolf I skinned last year. I wore rubber gloves when I skinned it. I had to go out right after skinning it. I was home for two days, where I took three showers and washed my hands several times. When I got back to camp, I could still smell that wolf on my hands.
I am impressed with the trappers in Alaska and Canada who have to hang frozen wolves in their cabins to thaw before skinning.
Oh well, the sweet smell of success.

Offline Norman89

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Re: Eating your catch
« Reply #22 on: November 23, 2020, 06:28:50 PM »
But the sweet smell off cash when that hide sells would probably offset the smell on your skin :o

Offline JakeLand

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Re: Eating your catch
« Reply #23 on: November 23, 2020, 08:34:39 PM »
That’s a cool pic right there ! You should post more ! Good work

Offline Loup Loup

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Re: Eating your catch
« Reply #24 on: November 23, 2020, 09:07:20 PM »
Thanks JakeLand, I appreciate it.
I am the photographer. But what Im striving for, is to be the Wolfer. Oh well, maybe next year.....

Offline AL WORRELLS KID

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Re: Eating your catch
« Reply #25 on: December 02, 2020, 08:03:43 PM »
From "Meateater"
Badger meat made quite a few appearances in mountain men journals. Historian Martin Schmitt noted that meals of badger were often a sign of necessity, or in cases like mine, curiosity. “Eaten by Lewis and Clark, and Wyeth, and listed by Farrow as a possible meal, the badger has never been acclaimed with enthusiasm as meat,” Schmitt wrote.

My favorite badger dining account comes courtesy of Thomas Becknell, though. While en route from Missouri to New Mexico, he encountered a badger for the first time and perfectly described the alien varmint.

“We found a ludicrous looking animal, unknown to any one of our company,” Becknell wrote. “It was about the size of a raccoon, of a light gray color, had uncommonly fine fur, small eyes, and was almost covered with long, shaggy hair.”

With an open mind, Becknell and his crew gave the badger meat a try. His review of the flesh is one of the first on record: “Its meat was tender and delicious.”
« Last Edit: December 02, 2020, 08:21:31 PM by AL WORRELLS KID »
"A trap is only a trap if you don't know about it. If you know about it, it's a challenge."....Wiley Coyote

Offline Loup Loup

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Re: Eating your catch
« Reply #26 on: December 02, 2020, 09:37:22 PM »
Ha ha Kid, Im guessing they were pretty hungry.
Reminds me of the two Mountain Men tasked with carrying dispatches from Wyoming to Missouri during the winter. After a long spell of terrible weather and no game around, they got lucky and shot two Ravens.
Later one of them was asked how did the Raven taste. He answered, he didn't know, he'd eaten it so fast he'd never tasted it.

Offline idaho guy

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Re: Eating your catch
« Reply #27 on: December 20, 2020, 08:33:04 AM »
Alchase: I have been schooled that wolves could be vectors of a varity of blood borne diseases. I have been taught to wear gloves and wash my skinning tools in bleach solution after skinning wolves. And honestly it wasnt a hard sell. Some wolves are really nasty. Its not like theyve rolled in something rotten, its just a really rank smell that permeates your skin.
I remember a wolf I skinned last year. I wore rubber gloves when I skinned it. I had to go out right after skinning it. I was home for two days, where I took three showers and washed my hands several times. When I got back to camp, I could still smell that wolf on my hands.
I am impressed with the trappers in Alaska and Canada who have to hang frozen wolves in their cabins to thaw before skinning.
Oh well, the sweet smell of success.
   

Great picture  :tup: when I took the Idaho wolf trapping class they were adamant about wearing gloves and said definitely don’t gut one if you can help it. Main thing that trapper thought was dangerous was the cyst they carry and transfers to humans. But the cyst was one of many things they could carry pretty filthy. I felt like an idiot because I had shot a wolf previously and we took one tiny bite of a well done backstrap from it. Tasted like rotten liver. Anyways that was over 10 years ago and I’m still alive :chuckle:.  Yes there was alcohol involved before and during the taste test ha ha. Hopefully I catch one this year and I will be wearing gloves. I think otter is legal bait in Idaho need to check but sounds like it would be useless? I wanted to prebait a bobcat set if legal after I check. I rarely disclose that I tried wolf but feel some anonymity on this site  :chuckle:

 


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