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Author Topic: bloody effluent  (Read 1356 times)

Offline KFhunter

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bloody effluent
« on: November 28, 2017, 08:29:28 PM »
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-42115794


Bloody sewage from Canada fish plant 'threatens' wild salmon

The red water samples collected later tested positive for pathogens potentially harmful to fish: PRV and Piscirickettsia salmonis bacteria.

The plants process farmed Atlantic salmon that are raised in open-net farms in the region, a major centre for the province's aquaculture industry.
Biologist Alex Morton sent the samples Campbell collected for testing at the Atlantic Veterinary College at the University of Prince Edward Island.



Offline cohoho

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Re: bloody effluent
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2017, 03:09:26 PM »
Yea saw that yesterday, crazy to think nothing is being done about it. 

Offline plugger

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Re: bloody effluent
« Reply #2 on: November 30, 2017, 01:59:52 PM »
Doesn't Victoria dump there sewage into the straits? Thinking that would be worse.

Offline lokidog

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Re: bloody effluent
« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2017, 02:37:08 PM »
And the witch hunt against farmed fish continues....

What do you think the results would be if they tested the outflow pipes from a plant that processes "wild" fish?  I'd bet it is the same. 

I have yet to see definitive evidence of these fish "taking over rivers and spawning", "competing for food", "giving wild fish diseases", "cross breeding with native fish", etc.  Sure, there are environmental impacts in the immediate area of the pens because of the increased amount of organics entering the system, but look at any animal farming operation and you will see the same thing. Look at the waste produced by any type of slaughterhouse, I bet is is as or nearly as bad.

BTW, I visited the Wallace Creek Hatchery a few days ago, in one pond, two of three fish had huge fungal growths on them. Where do the spores go?  Into the rivers where "wild" fish live? Do they treat these fish with antifungals or other antibiotics?  Where does that runoff go?

Just some food for thought.

Offline Alchase

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Re: bloody effluent
« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2017, 03:12:34 PM »
Doesn't Victoria dump there sewage into the straits? Thinking that would be worse.

Yes they do, so does Vancouver.
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Offline Cylvertip

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Re: bloody effluent
« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2017, 03:47:25 PM »
I don't think I would be swimming anywhere near where they are basically chumming for sharks.  Just sayin :dunno:
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Offline Bill W

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Re: bloody effluent
« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2017, 04:22:34 PM »
I could see that bringing in a load of six gill sharks.

Offline WaltAlpine

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Re: bloody effluent
« Reply #7 on: November 30, 2017, 05:23:39 PM »
And the witch hunt against farmed fish continues....

What do you think the results would be if they tested the outflow pipes from a plant that processes "wild" fish?  I'd bet it is the same. 

I have yet to see definitive evidence of these fish "taking over rivers and spawning", "competing for food", "giving wild fish diseases", "cross breeding with native fish", etc.  Sure, there are environmental impacts in the immediate area of the pens because of the increased amount of organics entering the system, but look at any animal farming operation and you will see the same thing. Look at the waste produced by any type of slaughterhouse, I bet is is as or nearly as bad.

BTW, I visited the Wallace Creek Hatchery a few days ago, in one pond, two of three fish had huge fungal growths on them. Where do the spores go?  Into the rivers where "wild" fish live? Do they treat these fish with antifungals or other antibiotics?  Where does that runoff go?

Just some food for thought.

Well, There are cases of all of the above except, "cross breeding with native fish". Farmed fish are a nightmare for everything except the economy.
If it were harmless then when the pens break the DFW wouldn't be begging for everybody to get out there and catch them all.

Offline lokidog

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Re: bloody effluent
« Reply #8 on: November 30, 2017, 05:39:08 PM »
And the witch hunt against farmed fish continues....

What do you think the results would be if they tested the outflow pipes from a plant that processes "wild" fish?  I'd bet it is the same. 

I have yet to see definitive evidence of these fish "taking over rivers and spawning", "competing for food", "giving wild fish diseases", "cross breeding with native fish", etc.  Sure, there are environmental impacts in the immediate area of the pens because of the increased amount of organics entering the system, but look at any animal farming operation and you will see the same thing. Look at the waste produced by any type of slaughterhouse, I bet is is as or nearly as bad.

BTW, I visited the Wallace Creek Hatchery a few days ago, in one pond, two of three fish had huge fungal growths on them. Where do the spores go?  Into the rivers where "wild" fish live? Do they treat these fish with antifungals or other antibiotics?  Where does that runoff go?

Just some food for thought.

Well, There are cases of all of the above except, "cross breeding with native fish". Farmed fish are a nightmare for everything except the economy.
If it were harmless then when the pens break the DFW wouldn't be begging for everybody to get out there and catch them all.

Please show me the evidence.  There have been farmed Atlantics in Puget Sound for over forty years, as I said, I haven't seen any evidence of them being the three horsemen of the apocalypse as some would like everyone to believe.  And sure, a few have spawned in rivers, but a problem?  Not even close.  In fact, attempts were made to establish them on the west coast and they all failed.  WDFW has open season on all non-native species in WA.  They pushed it so fishermen would actually feel like they were doing something for a change and getting something out of our license fees.

Offline KFhunter

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Re: bloody effluent
« Reply #9 on: November 30, 2017, 05:51:26 PM »
We should look at Norway for evidence, they're the largest fish farmers (salmon).

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jfd.12688/full


read this, it's eye opening.

This is the conclusion
Quote
5 CONCLUSIONS

SGPV was widely distributed in wild Atlantic salmon returning from marine migration. In addition, characteristic gill lesions, including apoptosis, were detected in this species. A low amount of viral DNA was detected in anadromous trout, but only in fish that had been cohabiting with SGPV-positive salmon before sampling. SGPV was absent in trout and salmon from non-anadromous water courses, and thus seems to be primarily linked to the marine environment. In addition, this finding lends support to the suggestion that trout are not natural hosts for SGPV. All Arctic char were PCR-negative, but due to a low sample size, these results are inconclusive. The use of freshwater from anadromous water sources may constitute a risk of introducing SGPV to hatcheries. On the other hand, a substantial number of infected farmed salmon constitute a considerable potential for virus propagation and spillback to wild populations. This interaction should therefore be further investigated.

Offline lokidog

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Re: bloody effluent
« Reply #10 on: November 30, 2017, 06:08:02 PM »
And where, pray tell, would the Atlantics get these viruses?  The eggs they hatch don't have them, they would only catch what is already in  the environment.  These fish are more susceptible to the diseases they catch from the local fish because they have not evolved to be resistant to them.  And, try not to let "evolve" get in the way of understanding science.

Your Norway comparison is apples to oranges, the farmed fish in Norway are the same species as the local fish, ours are not.  This is the reason it is allowed to farm Atlantics and not Chinook, Coho, or the like, unless you are a state or tribal hatchery, then it's OK.

Unless you are all against hatcheries as well, it is very hypocritical to be against farmed Atlantic salmon.

I'm done now, bye bye, until I see some actual evidence.....

Offline KFhunter

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Re: bloody effluent
« Reply #11 on: November 30, 2017, 06:15:25 PM »


hey don't get all bent over this, I know literally next to nothing about the industry nor am I against it.
I understand you've got some skin in this game and know way more than I, so how about sharing instead of huffing off all mad like?


Offline lokidog

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Re: bloody effluent
« Reply #12 on: November 30, 2017, 06:32:26 PM »


hey don't get all bent over this, I know literally next to nothing about the industry nor am I against it.
I understand you've got some skin in this game and know way more than I, so how about sharing instead of huffing off all mad like?

Sorry, just had some recent ignorance to deal with on FB regarding this.  I just don't know what else to say.  There is all kinds of doom and gloom professed toward this "evil", but I have yet to see any actual evidence.  I work with one of the most knowledgeable people in the area regarding the creatures and health of the Salish Sea and he can show no evidence supporting the hatred either.

Our native salmon problems have nothing to do with farmed fish, look to; habitat (though with millions spent "improving" freshwater habitat with little/no positive results shown, this is debatable); over harvest of certain stocks or unsustainable fishing methods; health of juvenile salmon food fish populations in Puget Sound (this being one of the largest factors in low survival of fish originating especially in the South Sound); and changing ocean conditions.

Offline KFhunter

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Re: bloody effluent
« Reply #13 on: November 30, 2017, 06:38:40 PM »
Thanks lokidog  :tup:

Offline lokidog

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Re: bloody effluent
« Reply #14 on: November 30, 2017, 06:46:22 PM »
BTW, I'm not saying pumping nasty crap into our wonderful waters is in any way a good thing.....

 

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